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Quotes of STRENGTH from Jane Austen

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Her merit in being gifted by Nature with strength and courage was fully appreciated by the Miss Bertrams; her delight in riding was like their own; her early excellence in it was like their own, and they had great pleasure in praising it.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER VII   Context
When her two dances with him were over, her inclination and strength for more were pretty well at an end; and Sir Thomas, having seen her walk rather than dance down the shortening set, breathless, and with her hand at her side, gave his orders for her sitting down entirely.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XXVIII   Context
The remembrance of all her earliest pleasures, and of what she had suffered in being torn from them, came over her with renewed strength, and it seemed as if to be at home again would heal every pain that had since grown out of the separation.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XXXVII   Context
It would have been a vast deal pleasanter to have had her more disinterested in her attachment; but his vanity was not of a strength to fight long against reason.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XLVII   Context
His happiness in knowing himself to have been so long the beloved of such a heart, must have been great enough to warrant any strength of language in which he could clothe it to her or to himself; it must have been a delightful happiness.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XLVIII   Context
She had two sisters to be benefited by her elevation; and such of their acquaintance as thought Miss Ward and Miss Frances quite as handsome as Miss Maria, did not scruple to predict their marrying with almost equal advantage.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER I   Context
We will endeavour to do our duty by her, and she will, at least, have the advantage of companions of her own age, and of a regular instructress.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER I   Context
I would have everybody marry if they can do it properly: I do not like to have people throw themselves away; but everybody should marry as soon as they can do it to advantage.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER IV   Context
She has the advantage in every feature, and I prefer her countenance; but I like Julia best; Miss Bertram is certainly the handsomest, and I have found her the most agreeable, but I shall always like Julia best, because you order me.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER V   Context
I know so many who have married in the full expectation and confidence of some one particular advantage in the connexion, or accomplishment, or good quality in the person, who have found themselves entirely deceived, and been obliged to put up with exactly the reverse.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER V   Context
The storm through Baron Wildenheim was the height of his theatrical ambition; and with the advantage of knowing half the scenes by heart already, he did now, with the greatest alacrity, offer his services for the part.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XIV   Context
Fanny felt the advantage; and, drawing back from the toils of civility, would have been again most happy, could she have kept her eyes from wandering between Edmund and Mary Crawford.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XXVIII   Context
Though their caution may prove eventually unnecessary, it was kindly meant; and of this you may be assured, that every advantage of affluence will be doubled by the little privations and restrictions that may have been imposed.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XXXII   Context
Fanny would have had quite as good a walk there, I assure you, with the advantage of being of some use, and obliging her aunt: it is all her fault.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XXXII   Context
He did not scruple to add that her being at home for a while would be a great advantage to everybody.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XXXVII   Context
In every argument with her mother, Susan had in point of reason the advantage, and never was there any maternal tenderness to buy her off.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XL   Context
She had a few tender reveries now and then, which he could sometimes take advantage of to look in her face without detection; and the result of these looks was, that though as bewitching as ever, her face was less blooming than it ought to be.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XLII   Context
The being left with her sister and nephew, and all the house under her care, had been an advantage entirely thrown away; she had been unable to direct or dictate, or even fancy herself useful.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XLVII   Context
Their time and strength, and spirits, were, therefore, exactly ready for this walk, and they entered into it with pleasure.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 10   Context
Anne, attending with all the strength and zeal, and thought, which instinct supplied, to Henrietta, still tried, at intervals, to suggest comfort to the others, tried to quiet Mary, to animate Charles, to assuage the feelings of Captain Wentworth.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 12   Context
Here and there, human nature may be great in times of trial; but generally speaking, it is its weakness and not its strength that appears in a sick chamber: it is selfishness and impatience rather than generosity and fortitude, that one hears of.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 17   Context
Their dress had every advantage, their faces were rather pretty, their spirits extremely good, their manner unembarrassed and pleasant; they were of consequence at home, and favourites abroad.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 5   Context
They are gone back to Kellynch, and almost made me swear to visit them this summer; but my first visit to Kellynch will be with a surveyor, to tell me how to bring it with best advantage to the hammer.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 21   Context
The united efforts of his two unfeeling sisters and of his overpowering friend, assisted by the attractions of Miss Darcy and the amusements of London might be too much, she feared, for the strength of his attachment.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 23   Context
He concluded with representing to her the strength of that attachment which, in spite of all his endeavours, he had found impossible to conquer; and with expressing his hope that it would now be rewarded by her acceptance of his hand.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 34   Context
The ladies were somewhat more fortunate, for they had the advantage of ascertaining from an upper window that he wore a blue coat, and rode a black horse.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 3   Context
It would look odd to be entirely silent for half an hour together; and yet for the advantage of some, conversation ought to be so arranged, as that they may have the trouble of saying as little as possible.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 18   Context
My object has been to secure an amiable companion for myself, with due consideration for the advantage of all your family, and if my manner has been at all reprehensible, I here beg leave to apologise.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 20   Context
His accompanying them was a double advantage; she felt all the compliment it offered to herself, and it was most acceptable as an occasion of introducing him to her father and mother.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 21   Context
Wickham wrote to inform me that, having finally resolved against taking orders, he hoped I should not think it unreasonable for him to expect some more immediate pecuniary advantage, in lieu of the preferment, by which he could not be benefited.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 35   Context
Wherever you and Jane are known you must be respected and valued; and you will not appear to less advantage for having a couple of�or I may say, three�very silly sisters.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 41   Context
Their taking her home, and affording her their personal protection and countenance, is such a sacrifice to her advantage as years of gratitude cannot enough acknowledge.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 49   Context
To be sure, it would have been more for the advantage of conversation had Miss Lydia Bennet come upon the town; or, as the happiest alternative, been secluded from the world, in some distant farmhouse.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 50   Context
It was an union that must have been to the advantage of both; by her ease and liveliness, his mind might have been softened, his manners improved; and from his judgement, information, and knowledge of the world, she must have received benefit of greater importance.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 50   Context
She knew how little such a situation would give pleasure to either, or make either appear to advantage.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 54   Context
Nor was it under many, many minutes that she could comprehend what she heard; though not in general backward to credit what was for the advantage of her family, or that came in the shape of a lover to any of them.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 59   Context
The situation of Barton, in a county so far distant from Sussex as Devonshire, which, but a few hours before, would have been a sufficient objection to outweigh every possible advantage belonging to the place, was now its first recommendation.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 4   Context
It was very early in September; the season was fine, and from first seeing the place under the advantage of good weather, they received an impression in its favour which was of material service in recommending it to their lasting approbation.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 6   Context
The immediate advantage to herself was by no means inconsiderable, for it supplied her with endless jokes against them both.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 8   Context
Marianne had at first the advantage, but a false step brought her suddenly to the ground; and Margaret, unable to stop herself to assist her, was involuntarily hurried along, and reached the bottom in safety.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 9   Context
Her systems have all the unfortunate tendency of setting propriety at nought; and a better acquaintance with the world is what I look forward to as her greatest possible advantage.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 11   Context
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