LETTERS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - letters in Sense and Sensibility
1  While they were at breakfast the letters were brought in.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
2  I have burnt all your letters, and will return your picture the first opportunity.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
3  Remember, Elinor," said she, "how very often Sir John fetches our letters himself from the post, and carries them to it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
4  That such letters, so full of affection and confidence, could have been so answered, Elinor, for Willoughby's sake, would have been unwilling to believe.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
5  Elinor said no more, and turning again to the three letters which now raised a much stronger curiosity than before, directly ran over the contents of all.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
6  He insisted, moreover, on conveying all their letters to and from the post for them, and would not be denied the satisfaction of sending them his newspaper every day.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
7  The letters from town, which a few days before would have made every nerve in Elinor's body thrill with transport, now arrived to be read with less emotion than mirth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
8  It is with great regret that I obey your commands in returning the letters with which I have been honoured from you, and the lock of hair, which you so obligingly bestowed on me.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
9  Long letters from her, quickly succeeding each other, arrived to tell all that she suffered and thought; to express her anxious solicitude for Marianne, and entreat she would bear up with fortitude under this misfortune.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
10  Mrs. Jennings therefore attending her up stairs into the sick chamber, to satisfy herself that all continued right, left her there again to her charge and her thoughts, and retired to her own room to write letters and sleep.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43
11  She instantly wrote Sir John Middleton her acknowledgment of his kindness, and her acceptance of his proposal; and then hastened to shew both letters to her daughters, that she might be secure of their approbation before her answer were sent.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
12  The latter, though unable to speak, seemed to feel all the tenderness of this behaviour, and after some time thus spent in joint affliction, she put all the letters into Elinor's hands; and then covering her face with her handkerchief, almost screamed with agony.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
13  Elinor, confirmed in every pleasant hope, was all cheerfulness; rejoicing that in her letters to her mother, she had pursued her own judgment rather than her friend's, in making very light of the indisposition which delayed them at Cleveland; and almost fixing on the time when Marianne would be able to travel.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43
14  How long it had been carrying on between them, however, he was equally at a loss with herself to make out; for at Oxford, where he had remained for choice ever since his quitting London, he had had no means of hearing of her but from herself, and her letters to the very last were neither less frequent, nor less affectionate than usual.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49