FANNY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Fanny in Sense and Sensibility
1  Fanny was startled at the proposal.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
2  I am come here to bespeak Fanny a seal.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
3  Elinor found that he and Fanny had been in town two days.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
4  It is enough," said she; "to say that he is unlike Fanny is enough.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
5  Fanny looked very angry too, and her husband was all in a fright at his sister's audacity.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
6  What poor Mrs. Ferrars suffered, when first Fanny broke it to her, is not to be described.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
7  "I shall have a charming account to carry to Fanny," said he, as he walked back with his sister.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
8  Her mother, sisters, Fanny, all had been conscious of his regard for her at Norland; it was not an illusion of her own vanity.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
9  It would be something remarkable, now," he continued, "something droll, if Fanny should have a brother and I a sister settling at the same time.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
10  I remember Fanny used to say that she would marry sooner and better than you did; not but what she is exceedingly fond of YOU, but so it happened to strike her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
11  All that Mrs. Ferrars could say to make him put an end to the engagement, assisted too as you may well suppose by my arguments, and Fanny's entreaties, was of no avail.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
12  He did not stipulate for any particular sum, my dear Fanny; he only requested me, in general terms, to assist them, and make their situation more comfortable than it was in his power to do.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
13  He expressed great pleasure in meeting Elinor, told her that he had been just going to call in Berkeley Street, and, assuring her that Fanny would be very glad to see her, invited her to come in.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41
14  Elinor had some difficulty here to refrain from observing, that she thought Fanny might have borne with composure, an acquisition of wealth to her brother, by which neither she nor her child could be possibly impoverished.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41
15  Fanny, rejoicing in her escape, and proud of the ready wit that had procured it, wrote the next morning to Lucy, to request her company and her sister's, for some days, in Harley Street, as soon as Lady Middleton could spare them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
16  Mrs. Ferrars, not aware of their being Elinor's work, particularly requested to look at them; and after they had received gratifying testimony of Lady Middletons's approbation, Fanny presented them to her mother, considerately informing her, at the same time, that they were done by Miss Dashwood.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
17  Elinor, having once delivered her opinion on William's side, by which she offended Mrs. Ferrars and Fanny still more, did not see the necessity of enforcing it by any farther assertion; and Marianne, when called on for hers, offended them all, by declaring that she had no opinion to give, as she had never thought about it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
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