ROBERT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Robert in Sense and Sensibility
1  She will be more hurt by it, for Robert always was her favourite.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
2  Robert's offence was unpardonable, but Lucy's was infinitely worse.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
3  THAT was due to the folly of Robert, and the cunning of his wife; and it was earned by them before many months had passed away.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
4  When Robert first sought her acquaintance, and privately visited her in Bartlett's Buildings, it was only with the view imputed to him by his brother.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
5  Elinor remembered what Robert had told her in Harley Street, of his opinion of what his own mediation in his brother's affairs might have done, if applied to in time.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
6  What Edward had done to forfeit the right of eldest son, might have puzzled many people to find out; and what Robert had done to succeed to it, might have puzzled them still more.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
7  The forgiveness, at first, indeed, as was reasonable, comprehended only Robert; and Lucy, who had owed his mother no duty and therefore could have transgressed none, still remained some weeks longer unpardoned.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
8  She perceived him soon afterwards looking at herself, and speaking familiarly to her brother; and had just determined to find out his name from the latter, when they both came towards her, and Mr. Dashwood introduced him to her as Mr. Robert Ferrars.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
9  The independence she settled on Robert, through resentment against you, has put it in his power to make his own choice; and she has actually been bribing one son with a thousand a-year, to do the very deed which she disinherited the other for intending to do.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
10  For many years of her life she had had two sons; but the crime and annihilation of Edward a few weeks ago, had robbed her of one; the similar annihilation of Robert had left her for a fortnight without any; and now, by the resuscitation of Edward, she had one again.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
11  But Elinor had no such dependence; for since Edward would still be unable to marry Miss Morton, and his chusing herself had been spoken of in Mrs. Ferrars's flattering language as only a lesser evil than his chusing Lucy Steele, she feared that Robert's offence would serve no other purpose than to enrich Fanny.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
12  But perseverance in humility of conduct and messages, in self-condemnation for Robert's offence, and gratitude for the unkindness she was treated with, procured her in time the haughty notice which overcame her by its graciousness, and led soon afterwards, by rapid degrees, to the highest state of affection and influence.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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13  Lucy became as necessary to Mrs. Ferrars, as either Robert or Fanny; and while Edward was never cordially forgiven for having once intended to marry her, and Elinor, though superior to her in fortune and birth, was spoken of as an intruder, SHE was in every thing considered, and always openly acknowledged, to be a favourite child.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
14  The selfish sagacity of the latter, which had at first drawn Robert into the scrape, was the principal instrument of his deliverance from it; for her respectful humility, assiduous attentions, and endless flatteries, as soon as the smallest opening was given for their exercise, reconciled Mrs. Ferrars to his choice, and re-established him completely in her favour.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
15  They settled in town, received very liberal assistance from Mrs. Ferrars, were on the best terms imaginable with the Dashwoods; and setting aside the jealousies and ill-will continually subsisting between Fanny and Lucy, in which their husbands of course took a part, as well as the frequent domestic disagreements between Robert and Lucy themselves, nothing could exceed the harmony in which they all lived together.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50