REGRET in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Regret in Sense and Sensibility
1  Not that you have any reason to regret, my dear Elinor.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41
2  The time may come when Harry will regret that so large a sum was parted with.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
3  As for regret," said Marianne, "I have done with that, as far as HE is concerned.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46
4  When they were seated in the dining room, Sir John observed with regret that they were only eight all together.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
5  I wish him very happy; and I am so sure of his always doing his duty, that though now he may harbour some regret, in the end he must become so.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
6  They afforded her no companion that could make amends for what she had left behind, nor that could teach her to think of Norland with less regret than ever.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
7  Nothing occurred during the next three or four days, to make Elinor regret what she had done, in applying to her mother; for Willoughby neither came nor wrote.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
8  I did myself the honour of calling in Berkeley Street last Tuesday, and very much regretted that I was not fortunate enough to find yourselves and Mrs. Jennings at home.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
9  It is with great regret that I obey your commands in returning the letters with which I have been honoured from you, and the lock of hair, which you so obligingly bestowed on me.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
10  Nothing but such a persuasion could have prevented his putting an end to an engagement, which, long before the discovery of it laid him open to his mother's anger, had been a continual source of disquiet and regret to him.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
11  She was stronger alone, and her own good sense so well supported her, that her firmness was as unshaken, her appearance of cheerfulness as invariable, as with regrets so poignant and so fresh, it was possible for them to be.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
12  She would not allow the presence of Lucy, nor the consciousness of some injustice towards herself, to deter her from saying that she was happy to see him, and that she had very much regretted being from home, when he called before in Berkeley Street.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
13  Again they all sat down, and for a moment or two all were silent; while Marianne was looking with the most speaking tenderness, sometimes at Edward and sometimes at Elinor, regretting only that their delight in each other should be checked by Lucy's unwelcome presence.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
14  Every thing in her household arrangements was conducted on the most liberal plan, and excepting a few old city friends, whom, to Lady Middleton's regret, she had never dropped, she visited no one to whom an introduction could at all discompose the feelings of her young companions.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
15  She felt all the force of that comparison; but not as her sister had hoped, to urge her to exertion now; she felt it with all the pain of continual self-reproach, regretted most bitterly that she had never exerted herself before; but it brought only the torture of penitence, without the hope of amendment.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
16  Mrs. Jennings, though regretting that she had not been five minutes earlier, was satisfied with the compromise; and Elinor, as she swallowed the chief of it, reflected, that though its effects on a colicky gout were, at present, of little importance to her, its healing powers, on a disappointed heart might be as reasonably tried on herself as on her sister.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
17  When Sir John returned, he joined most heartily in the general regret on so unfortunate an event; concluding however by observing, that as they were all got together, they must do something by way of being happy; and after some consultation it was agreed, that although happiness could only be enjoyed at Whitwell, they might procure a tolerable composure of mind by driving about the country.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
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