LUCY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Lucy in Sense and Sensibility
1  "We can mean no other," cried Lucy, smiling.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
2  Writing to each other," said Lucy, returning the letter into her pocket, "is the only comfort we have in such long separations.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
3  "We have heard Sir John admire it excessively," said Lucy, who seemed to think some apology necessary for the freedom of her sister.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
4  She did her best when thus called on, by speaking of Lady Middleton with more warmth than she felt, though with far less than Miss Lucy.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
5  Much as she had suffered from her first conversation with Lucy on the subject, she soon felt an earnest wish of renewing it; and this for more reasons than one.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
6  I am glad," said Lady Middleton to Lucy, "you are not going to finish poor little Annamaria's basket this evening; for I am sure it must hurt your eyes to work filigree by candlelight.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
7  What Lucy had asserted to be true, therefore, Elinor could not, dared not longer doubt; supported as it was too on every side by such probabilities and proofs, and contradicted by nothing but her own wishes.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
8  As she said this, she looked earnestly at Lucy, hoping to discover something in her countenance; perhaps the falsehood of the greatest part of what she had been saying; but Lucy's countenance suffered no change.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
9  Lucy directly drew her work table near her and reseated herself with an alacrity and cheerfulness which seemed to infer that she could taste no greater delight than in making a filigree basket for a spoilt child.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
10  She turned towards Lucy in silent amazement, unable to divine the reason or object of such a declaration; and though her complexion varied, she stood firm in incredulity, and felt in no danger of an hysterical fit, or a swoon.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
11  This hint was enough, Lucy recollected herself instantly and replied, "Indeed you are very much mistaken, Lady Middleton; I am only waiting to know whether you can make your party without me, or I should have been at my filigree already."
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
12  But indeed, while Elinor remained so well assured within herself of being really beloved by Edward, it required no other consideration of probabilities to make it natural that Lucy should be jealous; and that she was so, her very confidence was a proof.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
13  However small Elinor's general dependence on Lucy's veracity might be, it was impossible for her on serious reflection to suspect it in the present case, where no temptation could be answerable to the folly of inventing a falsehood of such a description.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
14  Perhaps," continued Elinor, "if I should happen to cut out, I may be of some use to Miss Lucy Steele, in rolling her papers for her; and there is so much still to be done to the basket, that it must be impossible I think for her labour singly, to finish it this evening.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
15  That Lucy was disposed to be jealous of her appeared very probable: it was plain that Edward had always spoken highly in her praise, not merely from Lucy's assertion, but from her venturing to trust her on so short a personal acquaintance, with a secret so confessedly and evidently important.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
16  You may well be surprised," continued Lucy; "for to be sure you could have had no idea of it before; for I dare say he never dropped the smallest hint of it to you or any of your family; because it was always meant to be a great secret, and I am sure has been faithfully kept so by me to this hour.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
17  The insipidity of the meeting was exactly such as Elinor had expected; it produced not one novelty of thought or expression, and nothing could be less interesting than the whole of their discourse both in the dining parlour and drawing room: to the latter, the children accompanied them, and while they remained there, she was too well convinced of the impossibility of engaging Lucy's attention to attempt it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
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