DELAFORD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Delaford in Sense and Sensibility
1  They would soon, she supposed, be settled at Delaford.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48
2  "You mean to go to Delaford after them I suppose," said Elinor, with a faint smile.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 40
3  The estate at Delaford was never reckoned more than two thousand a year, and his brother left everything sadly involved.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
4  Her own happiness, and her own spirits, were at least very certain; and she joined Mrs. Jennings most heartily in her expectation of their being all comfortably together in Delaford Parsonage before Michaelmas.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41
5  Colonel Brandon, who was here only ten minutes ago, has desired me to say, that understanding you mean to take orders, he has great pleasure in offering you the living of Delaford now just vacant, and only wishes it were more valuable.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 40
6  Mrs. Dashwood was acting on motives of policy as well as pleasure in the frequency of her visits at Delaford; for her wish of bringing Marianne and Colonel Brandon together was hardly less earnest, though rather more liberal than what John had expressed.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
7  I will not say that I am disappointed, my dear sister," said John, as they were walking together one morning before the gates of Delaford House, "THAT would be saying too much, for certainly you have been one of the most fortunate young women in the world, as it is.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
8  It was forwarded to me from Delaford, and I received it on the very morning of our intended party to Whitwell; and this was the reason of my leaving Barton so suddenly, which I am sure must at the time have appeared strange to every body, and which I believe gave offence to some.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
9  Mrs. Dashwood was prudent enough to remain at the cottage, without attempting a removal to Delaford; and fortunately for Sir John and Mrs. Jennings, when Marianne was taken from them, Margaret had reached an age highly suitable for dancing, and not very ineligible for being supposed to have a lover.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
10  Edward had two thousand pounds, and Elinor one, which, with Delaford living, was all that they could call their own; for it was impossible that Mrs. Dashwood should advance anything; and they were neither of them quite enough in love to think that three hundred and fifty pounds a-year would supply them with the comforts of life.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
11  Mrs. Dashwood and Elinor then followed, and the others were left by themselves, to talk of the travellers, and feel their own dullness, till Mrs. Jennings was summoned to her chaise to take comfort in the gossip of her maid for the loss of her two young companions; and Colonel Brandon immediately afterwards took his solitary way to Delaford.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46
12  As for Colonel Brandon, she was not only ready to worship him as a saint, but was moreover truly anxious that he should be treated as one in all worldly concerns; anxious that his tithes should be raised to the utmost; and scarcely resolved to avail herself, at Delaford, as far as she possibly could, of his servants, his carriage, his cows, and his poultry.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41
13  A three weeks' residence at Delaford, where, in his evening hours at least, he had little to do but to calculate the disproportion between thirty-six and seventeen, brought him to Barton in a temper of mind which needed all the improvement in Marianne's looks, all the kindness of her welcome, and all the encouragement of her mother's language, to make it cheerful.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
14  Of Edward, or at least of some of his concerns, she now received intelligence from Colonel Brandon, who had been into Dorsetshire lately; and who, treating her at once as the disinterested friend of Mr. Ferrars, and the kind of confidant of himself, talked to her a great deal of the parsonage at Delaford, described its deficiencies, and told her what he meant to do himself towards removing them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42