SISTERS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Sisters in Sense and Sensibility
1  Your sisters will marry, and it will be gone for ever.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
2  Mrs. John Dashwood did not at all approve of what her husband intended to do for his sisters.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
3  Her mother, sisters, Fanny, all had been conscious of his regard for her at Norland; it was not an illusion of her own vanity.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
4  When he gave his promise to his father, he meditated within himself to increase the fortunes of his sisters by the present of a thousand pounds a-piece.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
5  One morning, about a week after his leaving the country, Marianne was prevailed on to join her sisters in their usual walk, instead of wandering away by herself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
6  John Dashwood was really far from being sorry to see his sisters again; it rather gave them satisfaction; and his inquiries after their mother were respectful and attentive.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
7  His attentive behaviour to herself and his sisters convinced her that their welfare was dear to him, and, for a long time, she firmly relied on the liberality of his intentions.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
8  She got up with a headache, was unable to talk, and unwilling to take any nourishment; giving pain every moment to her mother and sisters, and forbidding all attempt at consolation from either.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
9  I thought you would, he is so pleasant; and Mr. Palmer is excessively pleased with you and your sisters I can tell you, and you can't think how disappointed he will be if you don't come to Cleveland.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
10  His son was sent for as soon as his danger was known, and to him Mr. Dashwood recommended, with all the strength and urgency which illness could command, the interest of his mother-in-law and sisters.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
11  If her sisters intended to walk on the downs, she directly stole away towards the lanes; if they talked of the valley, she was as speedy in climbing the hills, and could never be found when the others set off.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
12  There were moments in abundance, when, if not by the absence of her mother and sisters, at least by the nature of their employments, conversation was forbidden among them, and every effect of solitude was produced.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
13  To him therefore the succession to the Norland estate was not so really important as to his sisters; for their fortune, independent of what might arise to them from their father's inheriting that property, could be but small.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
14  Margaret, the other sister, was a good-humored, well-disposed girl; but as she had already imbibed a good deal of Marianne's romance, without having much of her sense, she did not, at thirteen, bid fair to equal her sisters at a more advanced period of life.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
15  Marianne looked again; her heart sunk within her; and abruptly turning round, she was hurrying back, when the voices of both her sisters were raised to detain her; a third, almost as well known as Willoughby's, joined them in begging her to stop, and she turned round with surprise to see and welcome Edward Ferrars.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
16  Supported by the conviction of having done nothing to merit her present unhappiness, and consoled by the belief that Edward had done nothing to forfeit her esteem, she thought she could even now, under the first smart of the heavy blow, command herself enough to guard every suspicion of the truth from her mother and sisters.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
17  Thus a circumstance occurred, while the sisters were together in their own room after breakfast, which sunk the heart of Mrs. Jennings still lower in her estimation; because, through her own weakness, it chanced to prove a source of fresh pain to herself, though Mrs. Jennings was governed in it by an impulse of the utmost goodwill.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
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