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Quotes of FEAR from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

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Anne is the only person that knows of it, and she has no judgment at all; indeed, she does me a great deal more harm than good, for I am in constant fear of her betraying me.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 22   Context
And this, I fear, is all that can be said for the conduct of one, who was at once her uncle and guardian.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 31   Context
I could not trace her beyond her first seducer, and there was every reason to fear that she had removed from him only to sink deeper in a life of sin.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 31   Context
And for my part, I was all in a fright for fear your sister should ask us for the huswifes she had gave us a day or two before; but, however, nothing was said about them, and I took care to keep mine out of sight.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 38   Context
She continued by the side of her sister, with little intermission the whole afternoon, calming every fear, satisfying every inquiry of her enfeebled spirits, supplying every succour, and watching almost every look and every breath.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 43   Context
Sir John was delighted; for to a man, whose prevailing anxiety was the dread of being alone, the acquisition of two, to the number of inhabitants in London, was something.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 25   Context
Jennings and Elinor were of the number; but Marianne, who knew that the Willoughbys were again in town, and had a constant dread of meeting them, chose rather to stay at home, than venture into so public a place.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 38   Context
And for my part, I was all in a fright for fear your sister should ask us for the huswifes she had gave us a day or two before; but, however, nothing was said about them, and I took care to keep mine out of sight.
Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility, CHAPTER 38   Context
Had my daughters been younger than herself, I should have considered the introduction of such a companion as a matter of very serious moment; but, as it is, I hope there can be nothing to fear for them, and everything to hope for her, from the association.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER I   Context
The place became less strange, and the people less formidable; and if there were some amongst them whom she could not cease to fear, she began at least to know their ways, and to catch the best manner of conforming to them.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER II   Context
Her awe of her uncle, and her dread of taking a liberty with him, made it instantly plain to her what she had to do.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XLV   Context
Fanny began to dread the meeting with her aunts and Tom, under so dreadful a humiliation; and Susan to feel with some anxiety, that all her best manners, all her lately acquired knowledge of what was practised here, was on the point of being called into action.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XLVI   Context
The terror of his former occasional visits to that room seemed all renewed, and she felt as if he were going to examine her again in French and English.
Jane Austen
Mansfield Park, CHAPTER XXXII   Context
This had been a proof of life, however, of service to her sister; and Henrietta, though perfectly incapable of being in the same room with Louisa, was kept, by the agitation of hope and fear, from a return of her own insensibility.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 12   Context
To feel that she ought to be in better circumstances, that a little trouble in the right place might do it, and to fear that delay might be even weakening her claims, was hard to bear.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 21   Context
Their actual speed, heightened by some dread of the conclusion, made the road appear but half as long as on the day before.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 12   Context
I should like to know his present opinion, as to the probability of the event he has been in dread of; whether he considers the danger to be lessening or not.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 21   Context
His profession was all that could ever make her friends wish that tenderness less, the dread of a future war all that could dim her sunshine.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 24   Context
Charles, Henrietta, and Captain Wentworth were the three in consultation, and for a little while it was only an interchange of perplexity and terror.
Jane Austen
Persuasion, Chapter 12   Context
She could not imagine what business he could have in town so soon after his arrival in Hertfordshire; and she began to fear that he might be always flying about from one place to another, and never settled at Netherfield as he ought to be.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 3   Context
Elizabeth was glad to be taken to her immediately; and Jane, who had only been withheld by the fear of giving alarm or inconvenience from expressing in her note how much she longed for such a visit, was delighted at her entrance.
Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 7   Context
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