FEAR in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - fear in Sense and Sensibility
1  She feared it was a strengthening regard.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
2  And this, I fear, is all that can be said for the conduct of one, who was at once her uncle and guardian.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
3  He is the most fearful of giving pain, of wounding expectation, and the most incapable of being selfish, of any body I ever saw.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
4  His complexion was white with agitation, and he looked as if fearful of his reception, and conscious that he merited no kind one.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48
5  Edward was the first to speak, and it was to notice Marianne's altered looks, and express his fear of her not finding London agree with her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
6  I could not trace her beyond her first seducer, and there was every reason to fear that she had removed from him only to sink deeper in a life of sin.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
7  He dared not come to Bartlett's Buildings for fear of detection, and though their mutual impatience to meet, was not to be told, they could do nothing at present but write.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
8  Anne is the only person that knows of it, and she has no judgment at all; indeed, she does me a great deal more harm than good, for I am in constant fear of her betraying me.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
9  Lady Middleton was ashamed of doing nothing before them, and the flattery which Lucy was proud to think of and administer at other times, she feared they would despise her for offering.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
10  Short was the time, however, in which that fear could affect her, for within half an hour after Willoughby's leaving the house, she was again called down stairs by the sound of another carriage.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45
11  I begged him to exert himself for fear you should suspect what was the matter; but it made him so melancholy, not being able to stay more than a fortnight with us, and seeing me so much affected.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
12  And for my part, I was all in a fright for fear your sister should ask us for the huswifes she had gave us a day or two before; but, however, nothing was said about them, and I took care to keep mine out of sight.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
13  She continued by the side of her sister, with little intermission the whole afternoon, calming every fear, satisfying every inquiry of her enfeebled spirits, supplying every succour, and watching almost every look and every breath.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43
14  She put it into her hands as she spoke; and when Elinor saw the painting, whatever other doubts her fear of a too hasty decision, or her wish of detecting falsehood might suffer to linger in her mind, she could have none of its being Edward's face.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
15  The past, the present, the future, Willoughby's visit, Marianne's safety, and her mother's expected arrival, threw her altogether into an agitation of spirits which kept off every indication of fatigue, and made her only fearful of betraying herself to her sister.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45
16  After a proper resistance on the part of Mrs. Ferrars, just so violent and so steady as to preserve her from that reproach which she always seemed fearful of incurring, the reproach of being too amiable, Edward was admitted to her presence, and pronounced to be again her son.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
17  Elinor, who saw as plainly by this, as if she had seen the direction, that it must come from Willoughby, felt immediately such a sickness at heart as made her hardly able to hold up her head, and sat in such a general tremour as made her fear it impossible to escape Mrs. Jennings's notice.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
18  This, and the manner in which it was said, immediately brought back to her remembrance all the circumstances of his quitting that place, with the uneasiness and suspicions they had caused to Mrs. Jennings, and she was fearful that her question had implied much more curiosity on the subject than she had ever felt.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
19  Elinor advised her to lie down again, and for a moment she did so; but no attitude could give her ease; and in restless pain of mind and body she moved from one posture to another, till growing more and more hysterical, her sister could with difficulty keep her on the bed at all, and for some time was fearful of being constrained to call for assistance.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
20  She thought it probable that as they lived in the same county, Mrs. Palmer might be able to give some more particular account of Willoughby's general character, than could be gathered from the Middletons' partial acquaintance with him; and she was eager to gain from any one, such a confirmation of his merits as might remove the possibility of fear from Marianne.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20