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3000 SAT Vocabulary Level 1 - 1

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abandon
abduction
abject
abrasive
absolute
absolve
absorb
abstinence
abstract
abusive
abyss
academic
accelerate
accessible
accessory
accommodate
accomplice
accord
acknowledge
acme
acquire
acquittal
acute
adage
adamant
adapt
addiction
address
adept
adhere
adjacent
administration
adolescence
adversary
adverse
adversity
advocate
aesthetic
affected
affidavit
affiliation
affliction
aftermath
agenda
agent
aggressor
alias
alien
alienate
alimony
allegiance
alleviate
alloy
allure
aloof
altercation
amend
amiss
ammunition
amnesia
amnesty
amoral
ample
amulet
analogy
anarchy
anchor
anecdote
anemia
anesthetic
anguish
animated
animosity
annex
anomaly
anonymity
anonymous
anthem
anthropologist
antidote
antiquated
antiseptic
ape
apocalyptic
apparatus
appease
application
appreciate
apprehend
appropriate
aptitude
arbitrary
arbitrator
arcade
archives
aria
array
arrest
arrogance
arrogant
arsenal
articulate
artifact
ascertain
asinine
aspire
assert
assessment
assumption
assurance
asteroid
astral
astronomical
astute
asylum
atlas
atone
attain
attentive
attest
attribute
audit
auditorium
august
authoritative
autopsy
auxiliary
avail
avalanche
avenge
aversion
avert
avid
awe
babble
badger
bait
balm
balmy
bane
barb
barren
beam
begrudge
belittle
benefactor
beneficial
beneficiary
benevolent
benign
bent
berserk
beseech
bestow
betray
biased
bizarre
bland
blasphemy
blatant
bleak
bloated
bluff
blunt
blurt
bode
bogus
bolt
booming
boundless
bourgeois
boycott
bravado
brazen
breach
brittle
brochure
brooch
browse
buffet
bureaucracy
burly
cache
cadaver
calculated
caliber
callous
camouflage
candor
canine
cant
capacity
caprice
caption
carat
cardinal
cardiologist
carnage
carnal
cascade
casualty
catalyst
catastrophe
catholic
caucus
cavalier
celebrated
censor
cerebral
champion
chaotic
charisma
charlatan
chaste
check
checkered
chisel
chivalrous
choreography
chronic
chronicle
cite
civil
clairvoyant
clandestine
clasp
clemency
clientele
clip
clout
coalition
coercion
coin
coincidence
collage
collateral
colossal
comatose
commemorate
communal
commute
compact
compatible
compelling
complement
compliance
component
compound
comprehensive
compress
compromise
compute
concede
conception
concession
concord
conundrum
convene
convention
conventional
converse
convert
conviction
cordial
coronation
corroborate
cosmic
cosmopolitan
covert
curator
curt
cynical
dabble
dank
deadlock
debacle
debris
debutante
decipher
decorum
decoy
default
defer
defiance
definitive
deflect
defuse
degenerate
degradation
delectable
delete
deliberate
delusion
demeanor
demented
demise
demolition
deploy
deposition
deranged

Word and Definition List
abandon   Pronounce
n. lacking restraint or control; feeling of extreme emotional intensity; unbounded enthusiasm
With her parents out of town, Kelly danced all night with abandon.
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abduction   Pronounce
n. the criminal act of capturing and carrying away by force
The movie Ransom describes the attempts to rescue a multimillionaire's son after the child's abduction by kidnappers.
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abject   Pronounce
a. being of the most miserable kind; wretched; lacking pride; brought low in condition or status
On the streets of New York, the homeless live in abject poverty, huddling in doorways to find shelter from the wind.
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abrasive   Pronounce
a. rubbing away; tending to grind down
The ash can also cause long-term abrasive damage to planes that could lead to later disasters if not dealt with.
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absolute   Pronounce
a. perfect in quality or nature; complete; totally unlimited; certain
Although the King was an absolute monarch, he did not want to behead his unfaithful wife without certain evidence.
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absolve   Pronounce
v. pronounce clear of guilt or blame; grant remission of sin to; acquit
The priest will absolve him and tell him how to say at the party.
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absorb   Pronounce
v. assimilate or incorporate; suck or drink up; occupy full attention
By contrast, what students can absorb from a one-day visit to a college are the tangibles.
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abstinence   Pronounce
n. restraint from eating or drinking;  refraining from indulging appetite or desire
The doctor recommended total abstinence from salted foods.
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abstract   Pronounce
a. theoretical; not concrete; not applied or practical; difficult to understand
To him, hunger was an abstract concept; he had never missed a meal.
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abusive   Pronounce
a. coarsely insulting; physically harmful; characterized by improper or wrongful use
There has been abusive language on both sides that never want to get agreement from the beginning.
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abyss   Pronounce
n. enormous chasm; vast bottomless pit; any deep, immeasurable space; hell
Are we to believe that the only thing between us and the abyss is the deficit's size, and the more the government borrows, the better off we shall be?
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academic   Pronounce
a. related to school; not practical or directly useful; relating to the scholarly organization; based on formal education
The dean's talk about reforming the college admissions system was only an academic discussion.
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accelerate   Pronounce
v. move faster; cause to develop or progress more quickly; occur sooner than expected
Demand for Taiwanese goods likely will accelerate from the second quarter, as strong Asian demand offsets the effects of a U.S. slowdown.
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accessible   Pronounce
a. easily approached or entered; obtainable; easy to talk to or get along with
Simon and James will no longer be posting to The Hearing; however, all previous posts will remain accessible here.
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accessory   Pronounce
n. additional object; useful but not essential thing; subordinate or supplementary item
Another accessory is a tripod needed to prevent camera shake, especially when the shutter speed drops below the tenth second at a wide-angle shot.
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accommodate   Pronounce
v. do a favor or service for; provide for; supply with; make suitable; adapt; allow for
The stage in the public auditorium can easily be adjusted to accommodate from a full-scale musical production to one by a solo vocalist.
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accomplice   Pronounce
n. partner in crime; associate in wrongdoing
Because your accomplice is a stranger, it's safer than asking a friend to participate in your ruse.
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accord   Pronounce
n. settlement or compromise of conflicting opinions; written agreement between two states
Although the accord is a small step forward, politicians worldwide have their work cut out for them.
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acknowledge   Pronounce
v. declare to be true or admit; express obligation, thanks
Although I acknowledge that the Beatles' tunes sound pretty dated today, I still prefer them to my brothers' songs.
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acme   Pronounce
n. the highest point or level, as of achievement or development; maturity or perfection of animal
His success in this role marked the acme of his career as an actor.
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acquire   Pronounce
v. gain through experience or effort; gain possession of; locate with a tracking system
They acquire a reputation for being difficult to work with.
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acquittal   Pronounce
n. state of being found or proved not guilty; judgment of not guilty
His acquittal by the jury surprised those who had thought him guilty.
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acute   Pronounce
a. quickly perceptive; keen; having a sharp point or tip; extremely sharp or severe
Her early writing was grounded in acute observation of the natural world.
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adage   Pronounce
n. wise saying; brief familiar proverb;  expression of popular wisdom
After reflecting on how I felt a year ago during the election itself and how I feel now, I do have to say that the adage is true: governing is harder than campaigning.
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adamant   Pronounce
a. extremely hard; inflexible; stubbornly unyielding
Speaker Pelosi came out of that meeting, and she was once again adamant about saying a public option must be in the bill.
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adapt   Pronounce
v. make fit for; change to suit a new purpose
One way to adapt is to become smaller, generation by generation.
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addiction   Pronounce
n. the compulsive physiological and psychological need for a substance; being abnormally dependent on something
No matter what form we find it in, addiction is not fun; drugs, alcohol, overeating, overworking, smoking or sex.
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address   Pronounce
v. make a formal speech to; deal with or discuss; direct efforts or attention of
Brown planned to address the issue of low-income housing in his speech.
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adept   Pronounce
a. expert at; very skilled; having or showing knowledge and skill and aptitude
Williams was known as an adept improviser who effortlessly switched between classical, jazz, and pop styles.
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adhere   Pronounce
v. stick fast; stick to firmly; be compatible or in accordance with
That is why the claying is necessary; it makes the grain adhere to the earth; otherwise, it would float.
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adjacent   Pronounce
a. adjoining; neighboring; close to; lying near
Philip's best friend Jason lived only four houses down the block, close but not immediately adjacent.
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administration   Pronounce
n. management; supervision; people who are in charge of management; the activity of government for powers and duties
Obviously, the key person in administration is the man in the White House.
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adolescence   Pronounce
n. state of growing up from childhood to manhood or womanhood; transitional period between youth and maturity
The big issue in adolescence is that all kids strive for independence.
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adversary   Pronounce
n. the opponent in a contest; someone who offers opposition
The young wrestler struggled to defeat his adversary.
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adverse   Pronounce
a. in opposing direction; harmful or unfavorable; acting or serving to oppose
The recession had a highly adverse effect on his father's investment portfolio: he lost so much money that he could no longer afford the house.
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adversity   Pronounce
n. state of misfortune, hardship, or affliction; misfortune
A young boy whose strength in adversity is an inspiration to all who know him.
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advocate   Pronounce
v. speak, plead, or argue in favor of; plead for; push for something
Some doctors advocate a smoking ban in the entire house.
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aesthetic   Pronounce
a. elegant or tasteful; of or concerning the appreciation of beauty or good taste
Kenneth Cole, the American designer, known for his modern, urban aesthetic, is hawking $35 T-shirts.
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affected   Pronounce
a. speaking or behaving in an artificial way; emotionally stirred or moved; infected or attacked
The other boys laughed so unmercifully at what they termed my affected accent.
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affidavit   Pronounce
n. written statement made under oath
This is an official affidavit from the court, and it is saying that the whole thing was a hoax.
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affiliation   Pronounce
n. partnership; alliance; association in the same family or society
This affiliation is a way for us to provide our clients with the full spectrum of services and expertise they need.
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affliction   Pronounce
n. cause or condition of pain, suffering, or distress
Even in the midst of her affliction, Elizabeth tried to keep up the spirits of those around her.
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aftermath   Pronounce
n. outcome; consequence, especially of a disaster or misfortune
The most critical lesson Barbara has learned from her diagnosis and the aftermath is the importance of selecting a good facility and sticking with it.
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agenda   Pronounce
n. items of business at a meeting; list or program of things to be done or considered
His agenda is certainly different from the President's and the administration's, but we will seek additional opportunities to work together with him.
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agent   Pronounce
n. one that acts on behalf of other persons or organizations
Whether your agent is acting in your best interests, I posed that question to a spokesman for the National Association of Realtors.
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aggressor   Pronounce
n. one that engages in aggression; a person who first attacks
The most violent reactions arise when the aggressor is the child's stepfather, the mother's new boyfriend, or her new husband.
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alias   Pronounce
n. assumed name; another name; a name that has been assumed temporarily
Since the alias is already defined in our management pack, it should work fine.
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alien   Pronounce
a. dissimilar, inconsistent, or opposed in nature; very different place, society, or person
If you think about it, that's totally alien to what a drug company might be expected to do because if you eradicate a disease, there's no need for that drug at all.
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alienate   Pronounce
v. cause to become unfriendly or hostile; transfer property or ownership; isolate or dissociate emotionally
We could not see what should again alienate us from one another or how one brother could again oppress another.
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alimony   Pronounce
n. payment by a husband to his divorced wife, or vice versa
Also, payer and payee can't file joint tax returns in the same year alimony is paid.
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allegiance   Pronounce
n. loyalty to a nation, sovereign, or cause; fidelity to any person or thing; devotion
They didn't want to salute the flag, saying that kind of allegiance is only for God.
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alleviate   Pronounce
v. provide physical relief, as from pain; make easier; remove in part
This should alleviate the pain; if it does not, we shall have to use stronger drugs.
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alloy   Pronounce
n. mixture; a combination of diverse things
In its ideal form, the alloy is a crystal with each element occupying specific crystal locations relative to one another.
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allure   Pronounce
v. attract with something desirable; be highly, often subtly attractive
Promises of quick profits allure the unwary investor.
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aloof   Pronounce
a. apart; remote in manner; distant physically or emotionally; reserved and remote
In this age of information and communication, no sector can remain aloof from the revolution in these fields.
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altercation   Pronounce
n. a noisy quarrel; contention in words; dispute carried on with heat or anger; controversy
So loud were their voices raised in an altercation that the storm without was scarce heeded.
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amend   Pronounce
v. change for the better; improve; remove faults or errors
Would McCain amend executive orders to ensure that communications between persons outside government and White House staff are disclosed to the public?
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amiss   Pronounce
a. out of proper order; not in perfect shape; faulty
I knew that weapons would not come in amiss, and I re-entered his room to get his rifle and shot-gun.
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ammunition   Pronounce
n. military stores or provisions; articles used in weapons, as powder, balls, shot, shells
I will carry these two rifles myself; the ammunition is all there except that bag in the corner.
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amnesia   Pronounce
n. partial or total loss of memory, usually resulting from shock or illness
Selective amnesia is a politically valuable trait.
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amnesty   Pronounce
n. the general pardon granted by the government, especially for political offenses
If the amnesty is approved by parliament, it will apply to capital stashed in off-shore tax havens up to the end of last year.
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amoral   Pronounce
a. lacking moral sensibility; not caring about right and wrong
Compared with evil immorality, being amoral is more like being naughty.
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ample   Pronounce
a. more than enough in size or scope or capacity; relatively large
They insist that food is being provided to the Palestinians in ample supplies and that the only way to weaken Hamas is to maintain the blockade.
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amulet   Pronounce
n. object worn, especially around the neck, as a charm against evil or injury; charm
In Thailand, the Jatukam Ramathep amulet is popular with everyone from Bangkok bankers to village taxi drivers.
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analogy   Pronounce
n. the similarity in some respects; comparison based on similarity
This analogy is almost always noted without further comment, although it may be taken further.
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anarchy   Pronounce
n. absence of governing body; state of disorder; political disorder and confusion
One might say that eastern Congo is already in anarchy, but Congo has faded from the headlines in recent months.
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anchor   Pronounce
v. secure or fasten firmly; be fixed in place; narrate or coordinate
We set the post in concrete to anchor it in place.
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anecdote   Pronounce
n. a short account of the amusing or interesting event; short narrative; a secret story of history or biography
Of all the millions who are moved by this historic occasion, my anecdote is and would be far less remarkable while I am amongst these.
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anemia   Pronounce
n. condition in which blood lacks red corpuscles; deficiency of red blood cells; lack of vitality
Long-standing illnesses often result in anemia, loss of weight, and occasional bleeding from the stomach.
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anesthetic   Pronounce
n. a substance that causes loss of sensation; producing temporary loss or impairment of feeling
His monotonous voice acted as an anesthetic; his audience was soon asleep.
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anguish   Pronounce
n. agonizing physical or mental pain; extreme suffering
Visiting the explosion site, the governor wept to see the anguish of the victims and their families.
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animated   Pronounce
a. having life or vigor or spirit; filled with activity; in the form of cartoon
On entering his room, I found Holmes in animated conversation with two men.
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animosity   Pronounce
n. bitter hostility; active hatred; hostile feeling or act
I've worked for Bill Clinton for years, and Bill Clinton, another Democrat who pushed socially responsible programs, got a lot of animosity from the right.
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annex   Pronounce
v. append or attach; take possession of; incorporate into an existing political unit
Mexico objected to the United States' attempts to annex the territory that later became Texas.
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anomaly   Pronounce
n. irregularity; a person or something unusual; departure from the normal or common order
No doubt, this anomaly is the result of the uncertain international environment and high-interest rates.
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anonymity   Pronounce
n. state of being nameless; one that is unknown or unacknowledged
In my view, death in anonymity is the ultimate insult to human dignity.
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anonymous   Pronounce
a. having no name; having an unknown or unacknowledged name
The buyer, who wished to remain anonymous, is a foreigner with homes in Europe.
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anthem   Pronounce
n. song of praise or patriotism; the song of devotion or loyalty
Let us now all join in singing the national anthem.
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anthropologist   Pronounce
n. one who studies history and science of mankind
Eighty-three years ago, an anthropologist from the Field Museum dug up the remains of 22 people from marked graves in Labrador, Canada.
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antidote   Pronounce
n. medicine to counteract a poison or disease; an agent that relieves or counteracts
They believe that because this anti-heroin antidote is what finally worked with some of the victims.
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antiquated   Pronounce
a. too old to be fashionable, suitable, or useful; obsolete; aged
We are tolerably conversant with the early English poets; and can discover no resemblance whatever, except in antiquated spelling and a few obsolete words.
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antiseptic   Pronounce
n. a substance that prevents infection; a substance that restricts the growth of disease-causing microorganisms
Regular washing with antiseptic is often enough to heal a skin infection.
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ape   Pronounce
v. imitate; mimic, as an ape imitates human actions
You will be suspended for a week if you ape the principal in front of the whole school like Tom.
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apocalyptic   Pronounce
a. prophetic; involving or portending widespread devastation
The crowd jeered the preacher's apocalyptic predictions of doom at the street.
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apparatus   Pronounce
n. a group of parts that work together to perform a given function; appliance, or device for a particular purpose
When the apparatus is at work, this gas becomes luminous, giving out a white and continuous light.
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appease   Pronounce
v. bring peace, quiet, or calm to; satisfy or relieve
Tom and Jody tried to appease the crying baby by offering him one toy after another, but he would not calm down.
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application   Pronounce
n. close attention; work of applying something; verbal or written request for assistance
Pleased with how well Tom had whitewashed the fence, Aunt Polly praised him for his application to the task.
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appreciate   Pronounce
v. be thankful for; increase in worth; be thoroughly conscious of
I am truly thankful for the stocks, which would appreciate in value considerably in future years.
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apprehend   Pronounce
v. take into custody; arrest a criminal; grasp mentally; perceive
The police will apprehend the culprit and convict him.
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appropriate   Pronounce
v. acquire; take possession of for one's own use; set apart for specific use
The ranch owners appropriate the lands that have originally been set aside for the Indians' use.
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aptitude   Pronounce
n. inherent ability; quickness in learning and understanding
The counselor gave him an aptitude test before advising him about the career he should follow.
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arbitrary   Pronounce
a. randomly chosen; determined by chance or impulse, and not by reason or principle
He threw an arbitrary assortment of clothes into his suitcase and headed off, not caring where he went.
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arbitrator   Pronounce
n. someone chosen to judge and decide the disputed issue;  one having the power to make authoritative decisions
Claimants in these cases would choose a single public arbitrator from a list of qualified individuals.
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arcade   Pronounce
n. covered passageway, usually lined with shops; simple arched opening in a wall; vault or vaulted place
The arcade was popular with shoppers because it protected the summer sun and the winter rain.
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archives   Pronounce
n. public records; place where public records are kept
These documents should be part of the archives so that historians may evaluate them in the future.
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aria   Pronounce
n. operatic solo; a solo vocal piece with instrumental accompaniment
Of course, throwing a pop star at an aria is a particularly uninspired solution.
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array   Pronounce
v. set out for display or use; place in orderly arrangement
He requested to array the whole regiment on the parade ground.
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arrest   Pronounce
v. stop or slow down; catch someone's attention; take into custody
The trapeze artists plunge from the heights until a safety net luckily arrest their fall.
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arrogance   Pronounce
n. overbearing pride; haughtiness; manifest feeling of personal superiority in rank, power, or estimation
I also think his arrogance is also turning people off.
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arrogant   Pronounce
a. arising from feeling or assumption of one's superiority toward others
He often speaks in an arrogant tone, which doesn't encourage others to discuss with him.
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arsenal   Pronounce
n. storage place for military equipment; a stock of weapons
People are forbidden to smoke in the arsenal because a stray spark might set off the munitions stored there.
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articulate   Pronounce
a. expressing oneself easily in clear and effective language
Her articulate presentation of the advertising campaign impressed her employers.
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artifact   Pronounce
n. the object made by human beings; inaccurate observation, effect, or result
Archaeologists debated the significance of the artifact discovered in the ruins of Asia Minor but did not conclude.
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ascertain   Pronounce
v. find out for certain; discover with certainty; make sure of
Please ascertain her present address.
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asinine   Pronounce
a. utterly stupid or silly; inanely foolish
Your asinine remarks prove that you have not given this problem any serious consideration.
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aspire   Pronounce
v. seek to attain; long for; strive toward an end
If you aspire to a career in professional sports, please enroll in a graduate program in sports management.
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assert   Pronounce
v. declare or state with confidence; put oneself forward boldly
If you quit acting like a wimp and assert yourself a bit more, you'd improve your chances of getting a date.
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assessment   Pronounce
n. act of judging or assessing; amount determined as payable
Key to this assessment is the critical geographical fact that North Korea is adjacent to South Korea, an affluent democracy.
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assumption   Pronounce
n. something taken for accepted as true without proof; taking over or taking possession of
The young princess made the foolish assumption that the regent would not object to power.
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assurance   Pronounce
n. promise or pledge; certainty; self-confidence; freedom from doubt
Even in BP CEO Tony Hayward's new television commercial, his assurance is ambiguous.
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asteroid   Pronounce
n. small planet; any small celestial bodies that revolve around the sun
With Vista at opposition, the asteroid is at its closest point to Earth in its orbit.
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astral   Pronounce
a. relating to stars; star-shaped
She was amazed at the number of astral bodies the new telescope revealed.
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astronomical   Pronounce
a. enormously large or extensive; relating to astronomy
The government seems willing to spend astronomical sums on weapons development.
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astute   Pronounce
a. wise or keen; shrewd; with sharp intelligence
The painter was an astute observer, noticing every tiny detail of her model's appearance and knowing exactly how important each one was.
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asylum   Pronounce
n. place of refuge or shelter; protection
The refugees sought asylum from religious persecution in a new land.
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atlas   Pronounce
n. a bound volume of maps, charts, or tables
Embarrassed at being unable to distinguish Slovenia from Slovakia, George W. finally consulted an atlas.
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atone   Pronounce
v. make amends, as for sin or fault; pay for; turn away from sin
He knew no way in which he could atone for his brutal crime.
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attain   Pronounce
v. achieve or accomplish; gain
The scarecrow sought to attain one goal: he wished to obtain a brain.
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attentive   Pronounce
a. alert and watchful; considerate; thoughtful
Spellbound, the attentive audience watched the final game of the tennis match, never taking their eyes from the ball.
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attest   Pronounce
v. testify; authenticate, affirm to be true
Having served as a member of the Grand Jury, I can attest that our system of indicting individuals requires improvement.
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attribute   Pronounce
n. essential quality; reputation; honor
His outstanding attribute was his kindness.
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audit   Pronounce
v. examine, verify, or correct the financial accounts of
Independent accountants audit the company annually.
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auditorium   Pronounce
n. area of theater or concert hall where the audience sits
A seat in the stalls or in one of the elaborate boxes surrounding the horseshoe-shaped auditorium now costs nearly 700 pounds.
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august   Pronounce
a. impressive; majestic; inspiring awe or admiration
Visiting the palace at Versailles, she was impressed by the august surroundings in which she found herself.
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authoritative   Pronounce
a. weighting authority; peremptory and dictatorial
Impressed by the young researcher's well-documented presentation, we accepted her analysis of the experiment as authoritative.
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autopsy   Pronounce
n. examination of dead body; post-mortem
The medical examiner ordered an autopsy to determine the cause of death.
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auxiliary   Pronounce
a. helper, additional or subsidiary
To prepare for the emergency, they built an auxiliary power station.
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avail   Pronounce
v. turn to the advantage of; be of service to; profit; promote
When his power ceases to avail, that is when a stronger than he appears upon the scene.
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avalanche   Pronounce
n. a great mass of falling snow and ice
The park ranger warned the skiers to stay on the main trails, where they would be in no danger of being buried beneath a sudden avalanche.
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avenge   Pronounce
v. take vengeance for something, or on behalf of someone
Hamlet vowed he would avenge his father's murder and punish Claudius for his horrible crime.
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aversion   Pronounce
n. firm dislike; turning away; avoidance of a thing, situation, or behavior because of dislike
Risk aversion is one of the most serious problems and the highest cost of our human space flight.
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avert   Pronounce
v. prevent; turn or cause to turn off or away
She had to avert her eyes from the dead cat on the highway.
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avid   Pronounce
a. greedy; eager for; marked by keen interest and enthusiasm
He was avid for learning and read everything he could get.
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awe   Pronounce
n. mixed emotion of reverence, respect, dread, and wonder; fear, as of something evil
The tourists gazed with awe at the tremendous expanse of the Grand Canyon.
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babble   Pronounce
v. talk foolishly or idly; utter meaningless confusion of words or sounds
The little girl likes to babble about her doll.
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badger   Pronounce
v. pester; annoy persistently; persuade through constant efforts
She is forced to change her telephone number because obscene phone calls badger her.
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bait   Pronounce
v. harass; tease; lure, entice, or entrap
The school bully will bait the smaller children, terrorizing them.
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balm   Pronounce
n. something that relieves pain
Friendship is the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.
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balmy   Pronounce
a. mild and pleasant; fragrant
A balmy breeze refreshed us after the sultry blast.
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bane   Pronounce
n. something causes misery or death; curse; fatal injury or ruin
Lucy's little brother was the bane of her existence: his attempts to make her life miserable worked so well that she could have poisoned him.
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barb   Pronounce
n. sharp projection from fishhook; openly cutting remark
If you were a politician, would you prefer being caught on the barb of a fishhook?
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barren   Pronounce
a. desolate; fruitless and unproductive; lacking
Looking out at the trackless, barren desert, Indiana Jones feared that his search for the missing expedition would prove fruitless.
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beam   Pronounce
n. ray of light; a long piece of metal or wood; long piece fixed or movable in structure, machine, or tool
During a severe earthquake, each beam will absorb the shock by crumpling, thereby preventing severe damage to the tower.
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begrudge   Pronounce
v. resent; give or expend with reluctance; be envious of
I begrudge every minute I have to spend attending meetings; they're a complete waste of time.
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belittle   Pronounce
v. disparage or depreciate; put down
Parents should not belittle their children's early attempts at drawing but should encourage their efforts.
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benefactor   Pronounce
n. gift giver; a person who gives people or institutions financial help
Scrooge later became Tiny Tim's benefactor and gave him gifts.
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beneficial   Pronounce
a. helpful; tending to promote physical well-being
Tiny Tim's cheerful good nature had a beneficial influence on Scrooge's charitable disposition.
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beneficiary   Pronounce
n. a person entitled to benefits or proceeds of an insurance policy or will
In Scrooge's will, he made Tiny Tim his beneficiary; everything he left would go to young Tim.
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benevolent   Pronounce
a. generous in providing aid to others; charitable
Mr. Fezziwig was a benevolent employer who wished to make Christmas merrier for young Scrooge and his other employees.
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benign   Pronounce
a. kindly; favorable; not malignant
Though her benign smile and gentle bearing made Miss Marple seem a sweet little old lady, in reality, she was a tough-minded lady.
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bent   Pronounce
a. determined to do or have
We are bent on going to the theater no matter how heavy the snow is.
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berserk   Pronounce
a. mentally or emotionally upset; deranged; excessively agitated
Angered, he became berserk and began to wreck the room.
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beseech   Pronounce
v. beg; plead with; ask for or request earnestly
The workaholic executive's wife had to beseech him to spend more time with their son.
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bestow   Pronounce
v. give as a gift; present
He wished to bestow great honors upon the hero.
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betray   Pronounce
v. be unfaithful; reveal unconsciously or unwillingly
The two spies betray their country by selling military secrets to the enemy.
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biased   Pronounce
a. favoring one person or side over another; prejudiced
Because the judge played golf regularly with the district attorney's father, we feared he might be biased in the prosecution's favor.
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bizarre   Pronounce
a. fantastic; violently contrasting; strangely unconventional in style or appearance
The plot of the novel was too bizarre to be believed.
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bland   Pronounce
a. lacking stimulating or mild; agreeable
She kept her gaze level and her expression bland, but her teeth were gritted.
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blasphemy   Pronounce
n. act of claiming for oneself the attributes and rights of God; utterance or writing concerning God
By our very nature, every single one of us believes in blasphemy.
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blatant   Pronounce
a. flagrant; conspicuously obvious; loudly offensive
To Dublin's unemployed youth, the 'No Irish Need Apply' placard in the shop window was a blatant mark of prejudice.
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bleak   Pronounce
a. cold or cheerless; unlikely to be favorable
The frigid, inhospitable Aleutian Islands are bleak military outposts.
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bloated   Pronounce
a. swollen or puffed as with water or air
Her bloated stomach came from drinking so much water.
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bluff   Pronounce
n. the pretense of strength; mislead or deceive
If only, I thought, he had called our bluff from the start and told us firmly that he knew the figures but wouldn't say.
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blunt   Pronounce
a. having a dull edge or end; not sharp; lacking in feeling; insensitive
Public employee unions are demanding in blunt terms that Democrats make the tax code more progressive.
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blurt   Pronounce
v. utter suddenly and impulsively
Before she can stop you, you should blurt out the news.
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bode   Pronounce
v. foreshadow; indicate by signs; be an omen of; predict
The gloomy skies and the odors from the mineral springs seemed to bode evil to those who settled in the area.
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bogus   Pronounce
a. counterfeit or fake; not authentic; not genuine
The police quickly found the distributors of the bogus twenty-dollar bills.
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bolt   Pronounce
v. dash or dart off; move or jump suddenly
Jack was set to bolt out the front door.
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booming   Pronounce
a. deep and resonant; flourishing; thriving
'Who needs a microphone?' cried the mayor in his booming voice.
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boundless   Pronounce
a. being without boundaries or limits; infinite; vast
Mike's energy was boundless: the greater the challenge, the more vigorously he tackled the job.
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bourgeois   Pronounce
a. middle class; selfishly materialistic; dully conventional
Technically, anyone who belongs to the middle class is bourgeois, but most people resent it if you call them that.
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boycott   Pronounce
v. refrain from buying or using
Cesar Chavez called for consumers to boycott grapes to put pressure on grape growers to stop using pesticides that harmed the farm workers' health.
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bravado   Pronounce
n. defiant or swaggering behavior; the pretense of courage; false show of bravery
The bravado of the young criminal disappeared when the victims of his brutal attack confronted him.
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brazen   Pronounce
a. having loud, usually harsh, resonant sound; shameless
His entire premiership has become an exercise in brazen dishonesty.
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breach   Pronounce
n. breaking of contract or duty; breaking of waves or surf; fissure or gap
Jill sued Jack for breach of promise, claiming he had broken his promise to marry her.
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brittle   Pronounce
a. easily broken; having little elasticity
My employer's self-control was as brittle as an egg-shell.
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brochure   Pronounce
n. pamphlet; small book usually having a paper cover
The Department of Agriculture issued this brochure on farming.
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brooch   Pronounce
n. ornamental clasp;  decorative pin worn by women
The brooch was a gift from Burton, and she wore it when she wed him.
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browse   Pronounce
v. graze; skim or glance at casually
'How now, brown cow, browsing in the green, green grass.' I remember lines of verse that I came across while I browsed through the bookstore's poetry section.
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buffet   Pronounce
n. table with food set out for people to serve themselves; meal at which people help themselves to food that's been set out
Please convey them on the tray to the buffet.
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bureaucracy   Pronounce
n. over-regulated administrative system
The Internal Revenue Service is the ultimate bureaucracy; taxpayers wasted so much paper filling out IRS forms to comply with the Paper-work Reduction Act.
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burly   Pronounce
a. husky; muscular and heavily built
That was 25 years ago, but I still recall the burly driver eying me in the rear-view mirror as we idled at a red light on Michigan Avenue.
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cache   Pronounce
n. hiding place; secret store of valuables or money
The detectives followed the suspect until he led them to the cache where he had stored his loot.
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cadaver   Pronounce
n. corpse; dead body, especially one intended for dissection
In some states, it is illegal to dissect cadaver.
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calculated   Pronounce
a. deliberately planned; carefully thought out in advance
Her conventional suit was one calculated to appeal to the conservative judges.
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caliber   Pronounce
n. ability; degree or grade of excellence or worth; diameter of a tube or gun barrel
Einstein's cleaning the blackboards again? Albert quit it! A man of your caliber shouldn't have to do such tasks.
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callous   Pronounce
a. emotionally hardened; unfeeling; toughened
He had worked in the hospital for so many years that he was callous to the suffering in the wards.
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camouflage   Pronounce
v. exploit natural surroundings to disguise something; conceal
To rescue Han Solo, Princess Leia decided to camouflage herself in the helmet and cloak of a space bandit.
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candor   Pronounce
n. frankness; quality of being honest and straightforward in attitude and speech
Jack can carry candor too far: when he told Jill his honest opinion of her, she nearly slapped his face.
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canine   Pronounce
a. related to dogs; dog-like; affecting or derived from dogs
They will then incubate the viruses in canine tissue cells to see how well they grow.
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cant   Pronounce
n. inclination or slope; slanted or oblique surface; jargon, especially of thieves; dialect
I strayed from my own voice and slipped into jargon, cant, or false sentiment.
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capacity   Pronounce
n. mental or physical ability; ability to accommodate
Mike had the capacity to handle several jobs at once.
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caprice   Pronounce
n. sudden, unexpected fancy; impulsive change of mind
Some revolutions may have originated in caprice or generated in ambition.
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caption   Pronounce
n. title; chapter heading; text under illustration
We got a caption error in The Far Side cartoons shown yesterday.
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carat   Pronounce
n. unit of weight for precious stones; a measure of fineness of gold
He gave her a three carat diamond mounted in a gold band.
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cardinal   Pronounce
a. chief; serving as an essential component
If you want to increase your word power, the cardinal rule of vocabulary-building is to read.
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cardiologist   Pronounce
n. the doctor who specializes in medical problems related to heart
When the physician noticed Philip had a slight heart murmur, she referred him to a cardiologist for further tests.
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carnage   Pronounce
n. destruction of life; the savage and excessive killing of many people
The film The Killing Fields vividly depicts the carnage wreaked by Pol Pot's followers in Cambodia.
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carnal   Pronounce
a. fleshly; of or relating to body or flesh; bodily
This wasn't about love; this was about raw animal attraction, about kindred spirits in carnal lust.
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cascade   Pronounce
n. small waterfall; sudden downpour
We were too tired to appreciate the beauty of this cascade because we had to detour around it to avoid watering down.
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casualty   Pronounce
n. serious or fatal accident; someone injured or killed in an accident
On holiday weekends, this city usually has at least one automotive casualty.
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catalyst   Pronounce
n. an agent which brings about chemical change while it remains unaffected and unchanged
Many chemical reactions cannot take place without the presence of a catalyst.
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catastrophe   Pronounce
n. calamity; disaster; state of extreme ruin and misfortune
The 1906 San Francisco earthquake was a catastrophe that destroyed most of the city.
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catholic   Pronounce
a. broadly sympathetic; universal; related to Roman Catholic Church
He was extremely catholic in his taste and read everything he could find in the library.
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caucus   Pronounce
n. a private meeting of members of a party to select officers or determine policy
At the opening of Congress, the members of the Democratic Party held a caucus to elect the Majority Leader of the House and the Party Whip.
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cavalier   Pronounce
a. offhand or casual; given to haughty disregard of others
The disguised prince resented the cavalier way in which the palace guards treated him. How dared they handle a member of the royal family so unceremoniously!
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celebrated   Pronounce
a. famous; well-known; having illustrious past
Thanks to their race to break Roger Maris's home-run record, Sammy Sosa and Mark McGwire are two of America's most celebrated baseball players.
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censor   Pronounce
n. overseer of morals; official responsible for removal of objectionable or sensitive content
Soldiers dislike having their mail read by a censor but understand the need for this precaution.
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cerebral   Pronounce
a. relating to the brain or cerebrum;  intellectual rather than emotional
The content of philosophical works is cerebral in nature and requires much thought.
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champion   Pronounce
v. protect or fight for the first place
They believe he could champion the oppressed in their struggle for equality.
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chaotic   Pronounce
a. in utter disorder; lacking visible order or organization
He tried to bring order into the chaotic state of affairs.
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charisma   Pronounce
n. divine gift; great popular charm or appeal of a political leader
Political commentators have deplored the importance of a candidate's charisma in these days of television campaigning.
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charlatan   Pronounce
n. quack; one who pretends to knowledge, skill, or importance
When they realized that the Wizard didn't know how to get them back to Kansas, Dorothy and her companions were indignant that a charlatan had duped them.
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chaste   Pronounce
a. morally pure in thought or conduct; decent and modest
However, if he remarried or did not remain chaste, the money would pass to her mother.
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check   Pronounce
v. stop motion; curb or restrain
Young man, you'd better check your temper.
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checkered   Pronounce
a. divided into squares; diversified in color; marked by great changes or shifts in fortune
During his checkered career, he had lived in palatial mansions and dreary boarding houses.
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chisel   Pronounce
n. a metal tool with a sharp edge used to cut and shape stone, wood, or metal
With his hammer and chisel, the sculptor chipped away at the block of marble.
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chivalrous   Pronounce
a. having qualities of ideal knight; faithful; brave
Toward his royal captive, he behaved in chivalrous fashion.
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choreography   Pronounce
n. art of representing dances in written symbols; the arrangement of dances
He has begun to use a computer in designing choreography; a software program allows him to compose arrangements of possible moves and immediately view them onscreen.
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chronic   Pronounce
a. lasting for a long period;  marked by frequent recurrence, as certain diseases
The doctors were finally able to attribute his chronic headaches to traces of formaldehyde gas in his apartment.
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chronicle   Pronounce
v. report or record in chronological order
The gossip columnist was paid to chronicle the latest escapades of the socially prominent celebrities.
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cite   Pronounce
v. quote; adduce as an instance
She could cite passages in the Bible from memory.
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civil   Pronounce
a. having to do with citizens or the state; courteous and polite
Although Internal Revenue Service agents are civil servants, they are not always courteous to suspected tax cheats.
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clairvoyant   Pronounce
n. having foresight; fortuneteller
The Trojans did not heed Cassandra's clairvoyant warning.
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clandestine   Pronounce
a. secret; conducted with or marked by hidden aims or methods
After avoiding their chaperon, the lovers had a clandestine meeting.
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clasp   Pronounce
n. fastening device; firm grip
When the clasp on Judy's bracelet broke, Fred repaired it, bending the hook back into shape.
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clemency   Pronounce
n. mildness, as of the weather; merciful, kind, or lenient act
The lawyer was pleased when the case was sent to Judge Smith's chambers because Smith was noted for her clemency toward first offenders.
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clientele   Pronounce
n. clients of professional person; the body of customers or patrons
Her clientele is slightly different from the average movie store because most of her customers only have a limited interest in a film due to busy schedules.
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clip   Pronounce
n. a small section of filmed or filed material
Phil's job at Fox Sports involved selecting the most important clip of the day's sporting highlights for later broadcast.
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clout   Pronounce
n. blow, especially with the fist; great influence, especially political or social
But then again, the new administration's foreign policy clout is yet to be truly tested.
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coalition   Pronounce
n. partnership; league; state of being combined into one body
The Rainbow coalition united people of all races in a common cause.
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coercion   Pronounce
n. use of force to get someone to obey
The inquisitors used physical and psychological coercion to force Joan of Arc to deny that God sent her visions.
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coin   Pronounce
v. make pieces of money from metal; invent or fabricate
Slanderers coin nasty rumors.
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coincidence   Pronounce
n. two or more things occurring at the same time by chance
Was it just a coincidence that she and John had chanced to meet at the market, or was he deliberately trying to seek her out?
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collage   Pronounce
n. work of art put together from fragments
Scraps of cloth, paper doilies, and old photographs all went into her collage.
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collateral   Pronounce
n. security pledged for repayment of loan
The sum you wish to borrow is so large that it must be secured by collateral.
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colossal   Pronounce
a. of extraordinary size; huge; gigantic
Radio City Music Hall has a colossal stage.
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comatose   Pronounce
a. in coma; extremely sleepy; unconscious
We would expect a reasonable adult, if a kid is in comatose, to call an ambulance.
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commemorate   Pronounce
v. serve as a memorial to; honor the memory of with a ceremony
The story of Fairchild that Mr. Moore was helping to commemorate is well-known in Silicon Valley.
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communal   Pronounce
a. held in common; of a group of people
When they were divorced, they had trouble dividing their communal property.
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commute   Pronounce
v. obtain or bargain for exemption or substitution; regularly travel from a place of residence to another place
In exchange for cooperating with detectives on another case, he criminally tried to commute his charges.
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compact   Pronounce
n. small and economical car; small cosmetics case
I decide to buy a compact because a small car helps to save gas.
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compatible   Pronounce
a. harmonious; having similar disposition and tastes
They were compatible neighbors, never quarreling over unimportant matters.
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compelling   Pronounce
a. overpowering; drivingly forceful; urgently requiring attention
They had better not succeed in compelling anyone to work the proposed shift to midnight.
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complement   Pronounce
v. complete; consummate; make perfect
The waiter recommended a glass of port to complement the cheese.
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compliance   Pronounce
n. readiness to yield; happy friendly agreement
Bullheaded Bill was not noted for easy compliance with the demands of others.
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component   Pronounce
n. element; ingredient; abstract part of something
Like all others of my stereo system, I hope this component is working at the same time.
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compound   Pronounce
n. combination of two or more elements or parts
As the compound is already patented, her team will probably have to design something slightly different to patent it as a new drug.
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comprehensive   Pronounce
a. thorough; including all or everything; broad in scope
Mr. Skubel has since completed what he describes as a comprehensive two-week training program and is now setting up his franchise in his hometown.
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compress   Pronounce
v. close; squeeze or press together; contract
She has to compress the package under her arm.
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compromise   Pronounce
v. adjust or settle by making mutual concessions; endanger the interests or reputation of
Sometimes the presence of a neutral third party can help adversaries compromise their differences.
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compute   Pronounce
v. reckon; make a mathematical calculation
He failed to compute the interest, so his bank balance was not accurate.
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concede   Pronounce
v. admit; yield; give up physical control of another
Despite all the evidence Monica had assembled, Mark refused to concede that she was right.
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conception   Pronounce
n. beginning; forming of an idea; an act of conceiving
At the first conception of the work, he was consulted.
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concession   Pronounce
n. act of yielding; point yielded; acknowledgment or admission
Before they could reach an agreement, both sides had to make their own concession.
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concord   Pronounce
n. agreement of opinions; harmonious state of things
The sisters are now in concord about the car they had to share.
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conundrum   Pronounce
n. riddle; difficult problem; dilemma
For this reason, the best way out of this conundrum is a political compromise.
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convene   Pronounce
v. cause to come together formally
Six days' public notice must be given when announcing the meeting schedules, meaning the earliest the board can next convene is July 24.
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convention   Pronounce
n. social or moral custom; formal meeting of members, representatives, or delegates; agreement between states
Moreover, following this convention is our friend's normal behavior when in such a mood.
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conventional   Pronounce
a. based upon traditional rules; formed by agreement or compact
In Russia, hardliners contend that their nation should rely more on nuclear weapons to offset NATO's superiority in conventional military forces.
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converse   Pronounce
v. chat; talk informally; engage in a spoken exchange of thoughts
Eva is all ears while Lulu and Lola converse.
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convert   Pronounce
n. change something into another form; transform
However, he suggests that this only be done if the convert is also willingly accepted into his position by the community.
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conviction   Pronounce
n. the judgment that someone is guilty of a crime; strongly held belief
Even her murder conviction did not shake Peter's judgment that Harriet was innocent of the crime.
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cordial   Pronounce
a. gracious; showing warmth and friendliness
Our hosts greeted us at the airport with a cordial welcome and a hearty hug.
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coronation   Pronounce
n. ceremony of crowning queen or king
When the witches told Macbeth he would be king; they failed to warn him he would lose his crown soon after his coronation.
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corroborate   Pronounce
v. establish or strengthen as with new evidence or facts; support with evidence
Though Huck was quite willing to corroborate Tom's story, Aunt Polly knew better than to believe either.
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cosmic   Pronounce
a. of the universe; vast
Cosmic rays derive their name from the fact that they bombard the earth's atmosphere from outer space.
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cosmopolitan   Pronounce
a. sophisticated; of worldwide scope
Her years in the capitol had transformed her into a cosmopolitan young woman highly aware of international affairs.
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covert   Pronounce
a. secretive, not openly shown
The covert military operation was not disclosed until weeks later after it was determined to succeed.
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curator   Pronounce
n. one who manages museum or library; superintendent; manager
She believes the most important quality for a curator is a deep, engaged knowledge of and curiosity about what is happening in contemporary art.
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curt   Pronounce
a. having been shortened; effectively cut short; rudely brief or abrupt, as in speech or manner
The grouchy shop assistant was curt with one of her customers, which resulted in a reprimand from her manager.
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cynical   Pronounce
a. skeptical of motives of others; selfishly calculating; negative or pessimistic
I find it sad and cynical that this guy is essentially saying things will not be better by 2012.
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dabble   Pronounce
v. splash liquid gently and playfully; undertake something without serious intent
When they retire at 45, they get another job, such as a real estate agent, and dabble in that industry.
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dank   Pronounce
a. disagreeably damp or humid; cold moisture; unpleasant humidity
They're ten thousand miles away, hiding in dank caves and surrounded by hundreds of people.
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deadlock   Pronounce
n. standstill resulting from the opposition of two forces or factions; stalemate
Because negotiations had reached a deadlock, some of the delegates had begun to mutter about breaking off the talks.
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debacle   Pronounce
n. sudden downfall; complete disaster
Every flight turns into a debacle in the Airplane movies, with passengers and crew members collapsing and baggage popping out of the overhead bins.
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debris   Pronounce
n. remains of something that has been destroyed or broken up
A full year after the earthquake in Mexico City, they were still carting away the debris.
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debutante   Pronounce
n. young woman making formal entrance into society
After her father loses everything, the debutante is forced to flee, pursued by gangsters.
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decipher   Pronounce
v. convert code into ordinary language; read with difficulty
Lacking his codebook, the spy could not decipher the scrambled message sent to him from the KGB.
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decorum   Pronounce
n. propriety in manners and conduct; good taste in manners; conventions or requirements of polite behavior
Keeping public decorum is an important factor in media credibility.
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decoy   Pronounce
n. lure or bait; means used to mislead or lead into danger
The decoy did not fool the wild ducks.
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default   Pronounce
n. failure to act; an option that is selected automatically
When the visiting team failed to show up for the big game, they lost the game by default.
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defer   Pronounce
v. delay till later; put off; hold back to a later time
I would again defer to responsible judgment when we're dealing with this kind of thing.
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defiance   Pronounce
n. refusal to yield; readiness to contend or resist
Now I feel by imperceptible signs, which I cannot yet interpret but will later, that his defiance is about to thaw.
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definitive   Pronounce
a. final; complete; precisely defined or explicit
And finally, the utility of the skeleton would be most likely to aid in definitive identification.
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deflect   Pronounce
v. turn aside; draw someone's attention away from something
No one believed that his life was saved because his cigarette case could deflect the bullet.
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defuse   Pronounce
v. remove the fuse of the bomb; reduce or eliminate the threat
Police negotiators are trained to defuse dangerous situations by avoiding confrontational language and behavior.
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degenerate   Pronounce
v. become worse; decline; fall
Not appear to disgrace his family, degenerate from the popular qualities, or lose the influence.
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degradation   Pronounce
n. humiliation; debasement; decline to a lower condition, quality, or level
Some secretaries object to fetching the boss a cup of coffee because they resent the degradation of being made to do such lowly tasks.
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delectable   Pronounce
a. delightful; delicious; extremely pleasing to the sense of taste
We thanked our host for a most delectable meal.
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delete   Pronounce
v. erase; strike out; remove or make invisible
Less is more: if you delete this paragraph, your whole essay will have greater appeal.
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deliberate   Pronounce
v. consider; think about carefully; weigh
Offered the new job, she asked for time to deliberate before she told them her decision.
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delusion   Pronounce
n. false belief; mistaken or unfounded opinion
Don suffers from grandeur delusion: he thinks he's a world-famous author when he's published just one paperback book.
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demeanor   Pronounce
n. conduct; management; way in which a person behaves
It'll be interesting to see what her demeanor is and what kind of witness she is.
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demented   Pronounce
a. insane; mad; of unsound mind; mentally ill
What kind of demented image of him have you painted in your head? In fact, he is a real gentleman.
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demise   Pronounce
n. end of existence or activity; termination
Upon the demise of the dictator, a bitter dispute about succession to power developed.
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demolition   Pronounce
n. act of overthrowing, pulling down, or destroying
One of the air force's major aims was the complete demolition of all means of transportation by the bombing of rail lines and terminals.
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deploy   Pronounce
v. position troops in readiness for combat, as along a front or line; put into use or action
The general ordered the battalion to deploy to meet the enemy offensive.
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deposition   Pronounce
n. testimony under oath; the act of depositing, especially laying down of matter by natural process
He made his deposition in the judge's chamber.
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deranged   Pronounce
a. disordered; especially in mind; crazy; insane
How deranged is she to think that she can blackmail the possible next president of the US?
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