9th Grade Spelling Words With Definition

Grade 9: With Definition - 2
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 Grade 9: With Definition - 2
canaryspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. pale yellowish color; wine made in the Canary Islands; canary bird; quick and lively dance
They were not unlike birds, altogether; having a sharp, brisk, sudden manner, and a little short, spruce way of adjusting themselves, like canaries.
David Copperfield - Chapter 41
By Charles Dickens Context
cannibalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. human being that eats human flesh; anything that devours its own kind
His hair and clothes were whitened with snow, and his sharp cannibal teeth, revealed by cold and wrath, gleamed through the dark.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 17
By Emily Bronte Context
capablespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. having the ability required for a specific task
The place deserves it, and you will find yourself not satisfied with much less than it is capable of.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 25
By Jane Austen Context
My friend was an enthusiastic musician, being himself not only a very capable performer but a composer of no ordinary merit.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
She was persuaded to believe the engagement a wrong thing: indiscreet, improper, hardly capable of success, and not deserving it.
Persuasion - Chapter 4
By Jane Austen Context
capacityspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. mental or physical ability; ability to accommodate
With the brow of a philosopher above and the jaw of a sensualist below, the man must have started with great capacities for good or for evil.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
But everyone worked according to his capacity The hens and ducks, for instance, saved five bushels of corn at the harvest by gathering up the stray grains.
Animal Farm - Chapter 3
By George Orwell Context
If all her capacity to feel had not been utterly exhausted, something in her would have protested against the plan taking form in her mind, for she hated Rhett as she hated no other person in all the world.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 32
By Margaret Mitche Context
captivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. prisoner taken by force; one kept in power of another; one charmed or subdued by beauty, excellence, or affection
The candle was relit, and there was our wretched captive, shivering and cowering in the grasp of the detective.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Again, the dreaded Sunday comes round, and I file into the old pew first, like a guarded captive brought to a condemned service.
David Copperfield - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
captivityspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. prison; confinement; state of being a prisoner
Presently a vagrant poodle dog came idling along, sad at heart, lazy with the summer softness and the quiet, weary of captivity, sighing for change.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 5
By Mark Twain Context
Micawber was accompanied by myself, and by little Wilkins and his sister, and by the twins, they did not receive him with that ardour which he might have expected, being so newly released from captivity.
David Copperfield - Chapter 17
By Charles Dickens Context
cargospeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. freight carried by a ship, an aircraft, or another vehicle
So Giovanni was already devoted to his ladies, as he had been devoted to cargoes of ladies in the past.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 17
By D H Lawrence Context
He disappeared, and presently returned with the wagon, put the two small sacks into it, threw some old rags on top of them, and started off, dragging his cargo behind him.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 33
By Mark Twain Context
At the onset of the war, he had emerged from obscurity with enough money to buy a small swift boat and now, when blockaded goods realized two thousand per cent on each cargo, he owned four boats.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 12
By Margaret Mitche Context
ceasespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. stop; terminate; put an end to; discontinue
By and by attention ceased from him, and the accustomed school murmur rose upon the dull air once more.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 6
By Mark Twain Context
Old Barley was growling and swearing when we repassed his door, with no appearance of having ceased or of meaning to cease.
Great Expectations - Chapter 46
By Charles Dickens Context
I read for about ten minutes, beginning in the heart of a chapter, and then suddenly, in the middle of a sentence, he ordered me to cease and to change my dress.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
celebrityspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a widely known person; the state of being well known
Here, on the left hand, there stands a shop window filled with photographs of the celebrities and beauties of the day.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Thus the congregation on Christmas morning is mostly a Tussaud collection of celebrities who have been born in the neighbourhood.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
ceremonyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. formal act or set of acts performed as prescribed by ritual or custom
Sikes then seized the terrified boy by the collar with very little ceremony; and all three were quickly inside the house.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
Peggotty was resolved that it should be quietly done; and the clerk had given her away, and there had been no witnesses of the ceremony.
David Copperfield - Chapter 10
By Charles Dickens Context
I began to say that I hoped I was not interrupting, when the clerk shoved this gentleman out with as little ceremony as I ever saw used, and tossing his fur cap out after him, left me alone.
Great Expectations - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
chantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. utter with a melodious voice; celebrate in song; make melody with the voice
Somehow she was sorry for him and did not want him to lie awake, so she leaned against the bed and began to stroke and pat his hand and sing a very low little chanting song in Hindustani.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 13
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
checkeredspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. divided into squares; diversified in color; marked by great changes or shifts in fortune
cherishspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. harbor; treasure; treat with affection and tenderness; hold dear
Price could no longer afford to cherish pride or resentment, or to lose one connexion that might possibly assist her.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 1
By Jane Austen Context
It is a world of disappointment: often to the hopes we most cherish, and hopes that do our nature the greatest honour.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 51
By Charles Dickens Context
If Louisa Musgrove would be beautiful and happy in her November of life, she will cherish all her present powers of mind.
Persuasion - Chapter 10
By Jane Austen Context
circumferencespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. boundary line of a circle, figure, area, or object
The loads were all laid together, and a pyramid of furze thirty feet in circumference now occupied the crown of the tumulus, which was known as Rainbarrow for many miles round.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
civilianspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. of or relating to nonmilitary life
To make matters worse, a vague distrust of those in high places had begun to creep over the civilian population.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 16
By Margaret Mitche Context
clammyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. having the quality of being viscous or adhesive; soft and sticky; glutinous; damp and adhesive
Now, for the first time, the deep stillness of the place laid a clammy hand upon the spirits of the children.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 31
By Mark Twain Context
Her legs were leaden, trembling with fatigue and strain, and she shivered with cold from the clammy sweat that soaked her body.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 22
By Margaret Mitche Context
The mud lay thick upon the stones, and a black mist hung over the streets; the rain fell sluggishly down, and everything felt cold and clammy to the touch.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 19
By Charles Dickens Context
classifyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. declare unavailable, as for security reasons; arrange or order by classes or categories
coincidespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. occur at the same time as; correspond
I had hoped that our sentiments coincided in every particular, but I must so far differ from you as to think our two youngest daughters uncommonly foolish.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 7
By Jane Austen Context
colossalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. of extraordinary size; huge; gigantic
It opened into the house, where the females were already astir; Zillah urging flakes of flame up the chimney with a colossal bellows; and Mrs.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 3
By Emily Bronte Context
Yet, instead of blaming herself for the issue she laid the fault upon the shoulders of some indistinct, colossal Prince of the World, who had framed her situation and ruled her lot.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
commencespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. have a beginning or origin; originate; start; begin
I have unusual business to transact with you, and I commence by explaining that it is not of my originating.
Great Expectations - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
I felt extremely flattered by this arrangement, and we commenced carrying it into execution that very evening.
David Copperfield - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
Now from this double point our research must commence, and we will begin it by presuming that what the lad says is absolutely true.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
commendspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. commit, entrust, or give in charge for care or preservation; recommend as worthy of confidence or regard
I showed him over the establishment, not omitting the pantry, with no little pride, and he commended it highly.
David Copperfield - Chapter 24
By Charles Dickens Context
The neatness and propriety of her dress was all that he would allow himself to commend in her presence, but upon her leaving the room again soon afterwards, he spoke of her beauty with very decided praise.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 28
By Jane Austen Context
compelspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. force; coerce; necessitate or pressure by force
Oliver told them all his simple history, and was often compelled to stop, by pain and want of strength.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 30
By Charles Dickens Context
They laid me on a couch, I motioned for air, they were compelled to open the window, and you had your chance.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Calvert had never known how to compel respect from negro servants and it was not to be expected that she could get it from a white man.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 29
By Margaret Mitche Context
competingspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. engaging in a contest; being in the state of competition, often unintentionally
But for a woman to leave the protection of her home and venture out into the rough world of men, competing with them in business, rubbing shoulders with them, being exposed to insult and gossip.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 36
By Margaret Mitche Context
concealspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. keep from being seen, found, observed, or discovered; secrete
They rose from a deep well, long concealed, and her heart was filled with acute pain that found no relief in them.
Hard Times - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
Jaggers had seen me with Estella, and was not likely to have missed the sentiments I had been at no pains to conceal.
Great Expectations - Chapter 48
By Charles Dickens Context
He was, as the inspector had said, extremely dirty, but the grime which covered his face could not conceal its repulsive ugliness.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
concludespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. enclose; reach as an end of reasoning; make final determination ; judge or decide; bring to an end
I gave him a short sketch of my adventures, and had hardly concluded it by the time that we reached our destination.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
If their evenings at the park were concluded with cards, he cheated himself and all the rest of the party to get her a good hand.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 11
By Jane Austen Context
But as I conclude that she must wish to go, since all young people like to be together, I can see no reason why she should be denied the indulgence.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 23
By Jane Austen Context
confederatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. ally; form a group or unite
Soon Raphael Semmes and the Confederate Navy would tend to those Yankee gunboats and the ports would be wide open.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 9
By Margaret Mitche Context
There he was dogged by his confederate, who held Beppo responsible for the loss of the pearl, and he stabbed him in the scuffle which followed.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He has little time, for he has heard the scuffle downstairs when the wife tried to force her way up, and perhaps he has already heard from his Lascar confederate that the police are hurrying up the street.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
consentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. agree in opinion or sentiment; be of the same mind; accord; concur; allow
This suspicion was given by some words which accidently dropped from him one evening at the park, when they were sitting down together by mutual consent, while the others were dancing.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 11
By Jane Austen Context
consequencespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. result; relation of a result to its cause; logical conclusion or inference
The consequence was, that the smaller boys spent their days in terror and suffering and their nights in plotting revenge.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 21
By Mark Twain Context
I have felt uneasy for the consequences of his being so involved, but I have kept these secrets until now, when I trust them to your honour.
Hard Times - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
Spirits were produced, in consequence of one of the young ladies complaining of a coldness in her inside; and the conversation took a very convivial and improving turn.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 9
By Charles Dickens Context
consistspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. be made up or composed; be comprised or contained in
My subject is Greek, and the first of the papers consists of a large passage of Greek translation which the candidate has not seen.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Thus I made the second discovery on that first occasion, that the nurture of the little Pockets consisted of alternately tumbling up and lying down.
Great Expectations - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
The walls were of wood, but the floor consisted of a large iron trough, and when I came to examine it I could see a crust of metallic deposit all over it.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
consolespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. cheer from distress or depression; alleviate grief and raise spirits of; relieve; comfort
Also to tell you, that you had best seek that home of yours, with all speed, and hide your head among those excellent people who are expecting you, and whom your money will console.
David Copperfield - Chapter 50
By Charles Dickens Context
conspicuousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. noticeable; prominent; easy to notice; obvious
He would rather walk with me in the evening than in the daylight, for he said that he hated to be conspicuous.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Her extraordinary fixity, her conspicuous loneliness, her heedlessness of night, betokened among other things an utter absence of fear.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
He is a thoroughly bad character who would take advantage of your youth and innocence to make you conspicuous and publicly disgrace you and your family.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 10
By Margaret Mitche Context
contemptspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. state of being despised or dishonored; disgrace; disobedience to, or open disrespect of
Gregson and Lestrade had watched the manoeuvres 9 of their amateur companion with considerable curiosity and some contempt.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
There was an expression of contempt on his face, and he bit the side of a great forefinger as he watched the group of faces.
Great Expectations - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
I knew from the first, that, if I could not do my work as well as any of the rest, I could not hold myself above slight and contempt.
David Copperfield - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
contentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. volume; something contained; material, including text and images
In an instant the contents assumed a dull mahogany colour, and a brownish dust was precipitated to the bottom of the glass jar.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
If there had been time, I should probably have ordered several suits of clothes for this occasion; but as there was not, I was fain to be content with those I had.
Great Expectations - Chapter 32
By Charles Dickens Context
contractspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. constrict; make smaller; compress or concentrate
So now, as an infallible way of making little ease great ease, I began to contract a quantity of debt.
Great Expectations - Chapter 34
By Charles Dickens Context
He had stood by the door, all this while, observant of her with a smile upon his face, though his black eyebrows were heavily contracted.
David Copperfield - Chapter 14
By Charles Dickens Context
A lady whose vision has been so extremely contracted all her life is sure to have the physical characteristics of such vision, which are seen in the forehead, the eyelids, and the shoulders.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
contributespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. provide; bestow a quality on
I have made a small study of tattoo marks and have even contributed to the literature of the subject.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
On the present occasion, for the better entertainment of their visitor, towards whose amusement he felt himself bound to contribute, he wished to engage them for both.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 18
By Jane Austen Context
His lack of interest in the subjects she started, and his equal incapacity to contribute to her entertainment, were so obvious that she could not conceal her disappointment.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 26
By Emily Bronte Context
convertspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. change something into another form; transform
Rumour reported that Drebber had managed to convert a large part of his property into money, and that he had departed a wealthy man, while his companion, Stangerson, was comparatively poor.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Grimwig lifted up his head, and converting one of the hind legs of his chair into a pivot, described three distinct circles with the assistance of his stick and the table; sitting in it all the time.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 41
By Charles Dickens Context
convictspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. find or declare guilty
In this he failed, but Alexis was sent a convict to Siberia, where now, at this moment, he works in a salt mine.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
cooperationspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. practice of cooperating; joint operation or action
If, as I imagine, there is no breach of the law in this matter, you can absolutely depend upon my discretion and my cooperation in keeping the facts out of the papers.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
cordialspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. gracious; showing warm and friendliness
Without saying a word, she walked up with a cordial face, shook hands with him, and patted him on the arm.
David Copperfield - Chapter 51
By Charles Dickens Context
His declining to be on cordial terms with the head of his family, has left a very strong impression in his disfavour with me.
Persuasion - Chapter 14
By Jane Austen Context
Indeed, I think I may say that you cannot, for your behaviour to him is perfectly cordial, and if THAT were your opinion, I am sure you could never be civil to him.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 4
By Jane Austen Context
corralspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. enclosure for confining livestock; enclosure formed by a circle of wagons for defense against attack during an encampment
On the outskirts of town were the remount depots where horses and mules milled about in large corrals, and along side streets were the hospitals.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 8
By Margaret Mitche Context
corrodespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. destroy metal or alloy gradually, especially by chemical action; be eaten or worn away
craftyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. relating to, or characterized by, skill; dexterous; skillful
I recollect well how indignantly my heart beat, as I saw his crafty face, with the appropriately red light of the fire upon it, preparing for something else.
David Copperfield - Chapter 25
By Charles Dickens Context
She remembered that both the crafty Jew and the brutal Sikes had confided to her schemes, which had been hidden from all others: in the full confidence that she was trustworthy and beyond the reach of their suspicion.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 44
By Charles Dickens Context
crimsonspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. of a rich deep red color inclining to purple; bloody
In and out through the open woodwork was woven a crimson cord, which was secured at each side to the crosspiece below.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
This was worse than before: the youth grew crimson, and clenched his fist, with every appearance of a meditated assault.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 2
By Emily Bronte Context
Now that the sun was setting in a welter of crimson behind the hills across the Flint River, the warmth of the April day was ebbing into a faint but balmy chill.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
crisisspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. dangerous situation; crucial or decisive point or situation; a turning point
He was off in one of those hysterical outbursts which come upon a strong nature when some great crisis is over and gone.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
If I had known that young man, at the period when my difficulties came to a crisis, all I can say is, that I believe my creditors would have been a great deal better managed than they were.
David Copperfield - Chapter 17
By Charles Dickens Context
For she only had to hold herself back in sexual intercourse, and let him finish and expend himself without herself coming to the crisis: and then she could prolong the connexion and achieve her orgasm and her crisis while he was merely her tool.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 1
By D H Lawrence Context
crudespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. being in an unrefined or natural state; raw; lacking tact or taste; blunt or offensive
Life in the north Georgia county of Clayton was still new and, according to the standards of Augusta, Savannah and Charleston, a little crude.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
The miners were, in a sense, his own men; but he saw them as objects rather than men, parts of the pit rather than parts of life, crude raw phenomena rather than human beings along with him.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 2
By D H Lawrence Context
daintyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. delicately beautiful or charming; exquisite; gratification or pleasure taken in anything
Elsing was younger, a thin frail woman, who had been a beauty, and about her there still clung a faded freshness, a dainty imperious air.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 8
By Margaret Mitche Context
Mary took him in hand, and when she was done with him he was a man and a brother, without distinction of color, and his saturated hair was neatly brushed, and its short curls wrought into a dainty and symmetrical general effect.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 4
By Mark Twain Context
dampenspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. moisten; lessen in force or effect
dapperspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. neatly dressed; very stylish in dress; lively and alert
The founder of that great emporium proved to be a brisk, crisp little person, very dapper and quick, with a clear head and a ready tongue.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
deadlyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. fatal; lethal; causing or tending to cause death
There was an old clock ticking loudly somewhere in the passage, but otherwise everything was deadly still.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
A gander who had been privy to the plot had confessed his guilt to Squealer and immediately committed suicide by swallowing deadly nightshade berries.
Animal Farm - Chapter 8
By George Orwell Context
Little Oliver Twist lay on his back on the pavement, with his shirt unbuttoned, and his temples bathed with water; his face a deadly white; and a cold tremble convulsing his whole frame.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
debatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. discussion; dispute; discussion involving opposing points
Nightly she debated with Melanie the advisability of sending Pork abroad on the horse with some greenbacks to try to buy food.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 28
By Margaret Mitche Context
Certainly the animals did not want Jones back; if the holding of debates on Sunday mornings was liable to bring him back, then the debates must stop.
Animal Farm - Chapter 5
By George Orwell Context
The debate upon it grew so lively, indeed, that at least six more honorable members told six more, during the discussion, that they believed they knew where they were to be found.
Great Expectations - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
deciduousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. falling off as of leaves; falling off or shed at specific season or stage of growth
Brambles, though churlish when handled, are kindly shelter in early winter, being the latest of the deciduous bushes to lose their leaves.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
decipherspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. convert code into ordinary language; read with difficulty
An immediate interest kindled within me for the unknown Catherine, and I began forthwith to decipher her faded hieroglyphics.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 3
By Emily Bronte Context
Holmes and I sat together in silence all the evening, he engaged with a powerful lens deciphering the remains of the original inscription upon a palimpsest, I deep in a recent treatise upon surgery.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
defectspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. abandon or turn against; cease or change one's loyalty
Well, I ought to turn that defect to advantage, and by being able to do without what other people require I can spend what such things cost upon anybody else.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
degradespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. reduce level; lower grade of something
If I had seen an Ape taking command of a Man, I should hardly have thought it a more degrading spectacle.
David Copperfield - Chapter 35
By Charles Dickens Context
I do not know that I am sorry, I do not know that I am ashamed, I do not know that I am degraded in my own esteem.
Hard Times - Chapter 21
By Charles Dickens Context
The reins, the halters, the blinkers, the degrading nosebags, were thrown on to the rubbish fire which was burning in the yard.
Animal Farm - Chapter 2
By George Orwell Context
dejectedspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. being in low spirits; depressed
A minute ago, the boy had looked the quiet child, mild, dejected creature that harsh treatment had made him.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 6
By Charles Dickens Context
I was crying all the time, but, except that I was conscious of being cold and dejected, I am sure I never thought why I cried.
David Copperfield - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
There was a double stream upon the stair, some going up in hope, and some coming back dejected; but we wedged in as well as we could and soon found ourselves in the office.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
deliberatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. consider; think about carefully; weigh
When I said that I only came to see how Miss Havisham was, Sarah evidently deliberated whether or no she should send me about my business.
Great Expectations - Chapter 15
By Charles Dickens Context
Sometimes one is guided by what they say of themselves, and very frequently by what other people say of them, without giving oneself time to deliberate and judge.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 17
By Jane Austen Context
We have been told what happens when a woman deliberates; and the epigram is not always terminable with woman, provided that one be in the case, and that a fair one.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
demolishspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. raze; destroy; do away with completely; put an end to
Fritchley, a perfect old Georgian mansion, was even now, as Connie passed in the car, being demolished.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 11
By D H Lawrence Context
densespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. thick; crowded closely together; compact
He entered a dense wood, picked his pathless way to the centre of it, and sat down on a mossy spot under a spreading oak.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 8
By Mark Twain Context
Far away I could catch glimpses of the old gray building with its bristling Tudor chimneys, but the drive ran through a dense shrubbery, and I saw no more of my man.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The old oaks, which had seen Indians pass under their limbs, hugged the house closely with their great trunks and towered their branches over the roof in dense shade.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 3
By Margaret Mitche Context
dependablespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. reliable; worthy of being depended on; trustworthy
depletespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. decrease fullness of; use up or empty out
depressspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. lower in spirits; press down
He is quieter now than he used to be, if no one provokes him: more sullen and depressed, and less furious.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 17
By Emily Bronte Context
In the meantime Eustacia, left alone in her cottage at Alderworth, had become considerably depressed by the posture of affairs.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
It was with a depressed heart that I walked in the starlight for an hour and more, about the courtyard, and about the brewery, and about the ruined garden.
Great Expectations - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
deputyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. one appointed as the substitute of another, and empowered to act for him; substitute in office