9th Grade Spelling Words With Definition

Grade 9: With Definition - 1
This is 9th Grade spelling vocabulary (1) and definitions. Some words has example sentences selected from classic literature. To help study and review these words, the vocabulary integrates training tools. E.g., online spelling practice and word meaning single choice quiz are available for each word in Grade 9.
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 Grade 9: With Definition - 1
abruptspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. broken off; very steep; having sudden transitions from one subject to another
They were within twenty yards of each other, and so abrupt was his appearance, that it was impossible to avoid his sight.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 43
By Jane Austen Context
I can hardly see how the lady could have acted otherwise, though her abrupt method of doing it was undoubtedly to be regretted.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Barkis made this abrupt announcement of their union, and could not hug me enough in token of her unimpaired affection; but she soon became herself again, and said she was very glad it was over.
David Copperfield - Chapter 10
By Charles Dickens Context
abstractspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. theoretical; not concrete; not applied or practical; difficult to understand
These were few enough, to be sure; but as we always fell back upon Blood, she had as wide a field for abstract speculation as her nephew himself.
David Copperfield - Chapter 25
By Charles Dickens Context
There remains the inexhaustive realm of abstract forms, and creativity with its shifting character ever determined afresh by its own creatures, and God, upon whose wisdom all forms of order depend.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 16
By D H Lawrence Context
abundantlyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
ad. in great numbers; in a plentiful or sufficient degree; plentifully
All of the world was crying out for cotton, and the new land of the County, unworn and fertile, produced it abundantly.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 3
By Margaret Mitche Context
That the honest fellow had not been feigning emotion, was abundantly demonstrated by the very red eyes with which he regarded the young gentleman, when he turned round and addressed him.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 34
By Charles Dickens Context
abusespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. improper use or handling; misuse
Her weapons of scorn, coldness and abuse blunted in her hands, for nothing she could say would shame him.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 12
By Margaret Mitche Context
He shrugged his shoulders: shook himself, indeed, as if his flesh crept with aversion; and thrust back his chair; while I got up, and opened my mouth, to commence a downright torrent of abuse.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 27
By Emily Bronte Context
adoptspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. accept; take on; raise; take into one's family
Put the case that, at the same time he held a trust to find a child for an eccentric rich lady to adopt and bring up.
Great Expectations - Chapter 51
By Charles Dickens Context
She has been allowed to dispose of her time in the most idle and frivolous manner, and to adopt any opinions that came in her way.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 47
By Jane Austen Context
Yeobright stood and considered what would be the best course to adopt with regard to the guineas, which she had not liked to entrust to Wildeve.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
adornspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. enhance or decorate with or as if with ornaments
The knife with which the crime had been committed was a curved Indian dagger, plucked down from a trophy of Oriental arms which adorned one of the walls.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 13
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I could not see him for the tears which his earnestness and goodness, so adorned by, and so adorning, the perfect simplicity of his manner, brought into my eyes.
David Copperfield - Chapter 42
By Charles Dickens Context
I have more than once observed to Lady Catherine, that her charming daughter seemed born to be a duchess, and that the most elevated rank, instead of giving her consequence, would be adorned by her.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 14
By Jane Austen Context
adversaryspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. opponent in contest; someone who offers opposition
He was certain to knock the wind out of common sense, and render that unlucky adversary deaf to the call of time.
Hard Times - Chapter 2
By Charles Dickens Context
His adversary had fallen senseless with excessive pain and the flow of blood, that gushed from an artery or a large vein.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 17
By Emily Bronte Context
At length Christian lost rapidly; and presently, to his horror, the whole fifty guineas belonging to Thomasin had been handed over to his adversary.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
affectspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. have an emotional or cognitive impact upon
The Jew rubbed his hands; and, sitting down at the table, affected to laugh at the pleasantry of his friend.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 15
By Charles Dickens Context
Never to put one hand to anything, on which I could throw my whole self; and never to affect depreciation of my work, whatever it was; I find, now, to have been my golden rules.
David Copperfield - Chapter 42
By Charles Dickens Context
Suddenly his followers saw him throw up his hands, as though overcome with astonishment, and on joining him they were affected in the same way by the sight which met their eyes.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
affectionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. fondness; tender feeling toward another; fondness
Her honest father may not have observed these symptoms, but they were assuredly not thrown away upon the man who had won her affections.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He receives these wares not only from treacherous valets or maids, but frequently from genteel ruffians, who have gained the confidence and affection of trusting women.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
It was a sort of comical affection, too; and yet if she had died, I cannot think what I should have done, or how I should have acted out the tragedy it would have been to me.
David Copperfield - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
agilespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. moving quickly and lightly; mentally quick
He was a fine figure of a man, tall, lithe, and agile, with a springy step and a pleasant, open face.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
ailmentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. sickness; illness; affliction
When the cow had the colic and the horse fell ill with a mysterious ailment which threatened to remove him permanently from them, Will sat up nights with them and saved them.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 30
By Margaret Mitche Context
alertspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. warning serves; alarm; condition of heightened watchfulness or preparation for action
They presently entered, softly, with quickened pulses, talking in whispers, ears alert to catch the slightest sound, and muscles tense and ready for instant retreat.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 26
By Mark Twain Context
With Hareton the resemblance is carried farther: it is singular at all times, then it was particularly striking; because his senses were alert, and his mental faculties wakened to unwonted activity.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 33
By Emily Bronte Context
allyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. confederate; partner; collaborator
She looked at the other woman, who stood so sly, with her head dropped: yet somehow, in her femaleness, an ally.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 16
By D H Lawrence Context
I felt that I must have something in reserve for my dreadful acquaintance, and his ally the still more dreadful young man.
Great Expectations - Chapter 2
By Charles Dickens Context
But at your time of life to feel all this, is a most favourable circumstance for yourself, and for everybody connected with you; and I am sensible of the importance of having an ally of such weight.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 19
By Jane Austen Context
almondspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. deciduous tree, native to Asia and northern Africa and having alternate, simple leaves, pink flowers, and leathery fruits
aloftspeak speak spelling word quiz 
ad. in or into a high place; high or higher up
I was supposed to be a clever sort of young fellow from Sheffield Grammar School, with a bit of French and German, very much up aloft.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 14
By D H Lawrence Context
As soon as he began to be in deep water he flung himself across the hatch; thus supported he was able to keep afloat as long as he chose, holding the lantern aloft with his disengaged hand.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
alterspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. modify; cause to change; make different; convert
And once, alter such an operation, Scarlett found her in the linen closet vomiting quietly into a towel.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 8
By Margaret Mitche Context
However, it was too late to alter the matter now, so I locked it up in my private safe and turned once more to my work.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
It did not appear to him that Sir Walter could materially alter his style of living in a house which had such a character of hospitality and ancient dignity to support.
Persuasion - Chapter 2
By Jane Austen Context
anathemaspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. solemn curse; someone or something regarded as a curse
anguishspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. agonizing physical or mental pain; extreme suffering
His breath went, as it were, out of his body and the cry of anguish which would have escaped him died upon his lips.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
It expressed, plainer than words could do, the intensest anguish at having made himself the instrument of thwarting his own revenge.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 9
By Emily Bronte Context
As they disappeared, the girl sunk down nearly at her full length upon one of the stone stairs, and vented the anguish of her heart in bitter tears.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 46
By Charles Dickens Context
anticipatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. act in advance of; deal with ahead of time; predict
The question was addressed to Bumble; but his wife anticipated the reply, by intimating that she was perfectly acquainted with it.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
This was naturally confusing, among so many strangers, and cost me some tears, but on the whole it was much better than I had anticipated.
David Copperfield - Chapter 6
By Charles Dickens Context
I prefer not to anticipate my communication here; you will impart as much or as little of it as you please to your friends afterwards; I have nothing to do with that.
Great Expectations - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
antiquatedspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. too old to be fashionable, suitable, or useful; obsolete; aged
Civilization was its enemy; and ever since the beginning of vegetation its soil had worn the same antique brown dress, the natural and invariable garment of the particular formation.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
antiquespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. any furniture old and valuable; out of fashion
Civilization was its enemy; and ever since the beginning of vegetation its soil had worn the same antique brown dress, the natural and invariable garment of the particular formation.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
applaudspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. acclaim; express approval, especially by clapping the hands
She could recount shamelessly and with pride how she had skinned people out of their eyeteeth and he would applaud.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 56
By Margaret Mitche Context
Also, on the other hand, that it will never cause him to be applauded as a prophet, revered as a priest, or exalted as a king.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
His eyes fairly glittered as he spoke, and he put his hand over his heart and bowed as if to some applauding crowd conjured up by his imagination.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
appointspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. assign a job or role to someone; designate; nominate
Micawber, that before I could think of leaving, they must appoint a day when they would come and dine with me.
David Copperfield - Chapter 27
By Charles Dickens Context
At his particular request, I appointed to call for him at the Castle at half past eight on Monday morning, and so we parted for the time.
Great Expectations - Chapter 55
By Charles Dickens Context
Oliver stretched himself in his clothes, by command of the same authority, on a mattress upon the floor; and the girl, mending the fire, sat before it, in readiness to rouse them at the appointed time.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
apprehensivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. capable of apprehending; knowing; conscious; relating to the faculty of apprehension; sensible; feeling; perceptive
I recall, sir, that on that occasion you went so far as to say you were actually apprehensive of Miss Gradgrind.
Hard Times - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
They glanced backward over their shoulders from time to time, apprehensively, as if they feared they might be followed.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 10
By Mark Twain Context
approximatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. come close or be similar to something in quality, nature, or quantity; come near
aptspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. likely; exactly suitable; appropriate; quick to learn or understand
The larger crimes are apt to be the simpler, for the bigger the crime the more obvious, as a rule, is the motive.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Fortunately, curiosity and a quick intellect made her an apt scholar: she learned rapidly and eagerly, and did honour to his teaching.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 18
By Emily Bronte Context
To this end, Ellen and Mammy bent their efforts, and as Scarlett grew older she became an apt pupil in this subject, even though she learned little else.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 3
By Margaret Mitche Context
archetypespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. prototype; original model or type after which other similar things are patterned
arenaspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. playing field where sports events take place; large structure for open-air sports or entertainments
I might have been an unfortunate little bull in a Spanish arena, I got so smartingly touched up by these moral goads.
Great Expectations - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
assaultspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a physical attack; onslaught
Williamson and Woodley were both tried for abduction and assault, the former getting seven years the latter ten.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
This was worse than before: the youth grew crimson, and clenched his fist, with every appearance of a meditated assault.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 2
By Emily Bronte Context
I have done nothing actionable from the first, but as long as you keep that door locked you lay yourself open to an action for assault and illegal constraint.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
assemblespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. put together; bring or call together into a group or whole
A great multitude had already assembled; the windows were filled with people, smoking and playing cards to beguile the time; the crowd were pushing, quarrelling, joking.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 52
By Charles Dickens Context
The congregation being fully assembled, now, the bell rang once more, to warn laggards and stragglers, and then a solemn hush fell upon the church which was only broken by the tittering and whispering of the choir in the gallery.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 5
By Mark Twain Context
There was an improving party assembled on the auspicious occasion, who knew what everything they had to eat and drink was made of, and how it was imported or exported, and in what quantities, and in what bottoms, whether native or foreign, and all about it.
Hard Times - Chapter 14
By Charles Dickens Context
assistspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. give help or support to, especially as a subordinate
As to my own case, I am ready to give you any information which may assist you in forming an opinion.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I told him that my old nurse would be delighted to assist him, and that we would all three take the field together, but on one condition.
David Copperfield - Chapter 34
By Charles Dickens Context
I seek to repair what is amiss, if I possibly can; and I hope you will assist me in a good spirit, Bounderby, for I have been very much distressed.
Hard Times - Chapter 23
By Charles Dickens Context
associatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. connect or join together; combine
I shall not associate him in our conversation with your intimacy and encouragement; pray do not persist in connecting him with mine.
Hard Times - Chapter 23
By Charles Dickens Context
He has been of most vital use to me in several of my cases, and a lucky chance has made it possible for me to bring him out and associate him with this investigation.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
We saw the cold winter sun rise over the dreary marshes of the Thames and the long, sullen reaches of the river, which I shall ever associate with our pursuit of the Andaman Islander in the earlier days of our career.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
assuagespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. ease or lessen pain; satisfy or appease
Her tongue was furred and her throat parched as if flames had scorched it and no amount of water could assuage her thirst.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 25
By Margaret Mitche Context
As he stood by the desolate fire, he felt that the only one thing which could assuage his grief would be thorough and complete retribution, brought by his own hand upon his enemies.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Anne, attending with all the strength and zeal, and thought, which instinct supplied, to Henrietta, still tried, at intervals, to suggest comfort to the others, tried to quiet Mary, to animate Charles, to assuage the feelings of Captain Wentworth.
Persuasion - Chapter 12
By Jane Austen Context
atrophyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. wasting away; decrease in size; reduction in the functionality of an organ caused by disease
attainspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. achieve or accomplish; gain
Surely no man would work so hard or attain such precise information unless he had some definite end in view.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He was struggling for the appearance of composure, and would not open his lips till he believed himself to have attained it.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 34
By Jane Austen Context
Suddenly she hated them all because they were different from her, because they carried their losses with an air that she could never attain, would never wish to attain.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 35
By Margaret Mitche Context
attendspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. be present at; go to; take care of; tend
I put it on, I remember, for the first time, to attend the inquest on that reduced tradesman, who died in a doorway at midnight.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
And Squealer, who happened to be passing at this moment, attended by two or three dogs, was able to put the whole matter in its proper perspective.
Animal Farm - Chapter 6
By George Orwell Context
Dick again, who joined us, and looked as wise as he could when she requested him to attend to my story, which she elicited from me, gradually, by a course of questions.
David Copperfield - Chapter 13
By Charles Dickens Context
attentivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. alert and watchful; considerate; thoughtful
At breakfast, Monday morning, Aunt Polly and Mary were very loving to Tom, and very attentive to his wants.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 18
By Mark Twain Context
Dick took his finger out of his mouth, on this hint, and stood among the group, with a grave and attentive expression of face.
David Copperfield - Chapter 14
By Charles Dickens Context
But if he had looked at me for an hour or for a day, I could not have remembered his face ever afterwards, as having been more attentive.
Great Expectations - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
attirespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. clothes, especially fine or formal ones; dress
Merriwether to upbraid her daughter and point out that homespun was the proper bridal attire for a Confederate bride.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 12
By Margaret Mitche Context
Nature had given them no inconsiderable share of beauty, and every Sunday dressed them in their cleanest skins and best attire.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 42
By Jane Austen Context
awkwardspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. difficult to handle or manage
Barkis appeared in an exceedingly vacant and awkward condition, and with a bundle of oranges tied up in a handkerchief.
David Copperfield - Chapter 10
By Charles Dickens Context
Scarlett was his wife and he could not insult her by asking awkward questions which, after all, would not remedy matters.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 36
By Margaret Mitche Context
Miss Carteret, with still less to say, was so plain and so awkward, that she would never have been tolerated in Camden Place but for her birth.
Persuasion - Chapter 16
By Jane Austen Context
babblespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. talk foolishly or idly; utter meaningless confusion of words or sounds
The house seemed bursting with the crowd, and a ceaseless babble of talking and laughter and giggles and shrill feminine squeaks and screams rose and fell.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 6
By Margaret Mitche Context
bafflespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. frustrate as by confusing or perplexing; impede force or movement of
After that I fell among those thieves, the nine figures, who seemed every evening to do something new to disguise themselves and baffle recognition.
Great Expectations - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
Sensing something they could not understand, baffled and annoyed by it, the twins struggled along for a while, and then rose reluctantly, looking at their watches.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
baggagespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. trunks, bags, parcels, and suitcases in which one carries one's belongings while traveling; luggage
There was a train leaving for Atlanta in ten minutes and she caught it, carrying no baggage except her reticule and leaving Wade and Ella at the hotel with Prissy.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 61
By Margaret Mitche Context
basinspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. bowl-shaped vessel, usually used for holding food or liquids
I sat down to my brown loaf, my egg, and my rasher of bacon, with a basin of milk besides, and made a most delicious meal.
David Copperfield - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
The basin was refilled, and this time he stood over it a little while, gathering resolution; took in a big breath and began.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 4
By Mark Twain Context
Here he was taken off his legs, and in swimming was carried round into the centre of the basin, where he perceived Wildeve struggling.
Return of the Native - Chapter 0
By Thomas Hardy Context
benefitspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. advantage; something that aids or promotes well-being ; welfare; gain
Soon Tom said that they were interfering with each other, and neither getting the fullest benefit of the tick.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 7
By Mark Twain Context
Dashwood immediately took all that trouble on herself; and Elinor had the benefit of the information without the exertion of seeking it.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 47
By Jane Austen Context
As it was, he did nothing with much zeal, but sport; and his time was otherwise trifled away, without benefit from books or anything else.
Persuasion - Chapter 6
By Jane Austen Context
bestowspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. give as gift; present
So much the greater must have been the solitude of her heart, and her need of some one on whom to bestow it.
Hard Times - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
There were songs, speeches, and more firing of the gun, and a special gift of an apple was bestowed on every animal, with two ounces of corn for each bird and three biscuits for each dog.
Animal Farm - Chapter 8
By George Orwell Context
The young gentleman did not stop to bestow any other mark of recognition upon Oliver than a humourous grin; but, turning away, beckoned the visitors to follow him down a flight of stairs.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
biennialspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. every two years; lasting or living for two years
blemishspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. mark with deformity; injure or impair, as anything which is excellent; make defective, either the body or mind
blockadespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. shutting up of a place by troops or ships; obstruction to passage
Already the foundries were beginning to feel the lack of iron, for little or none came through the blockade, and the mines in Alabama were standing almost idle while the miners were at the front.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 8
By Margaret Mitche Context
For similar reasons I made no allusion to the skirmishing plates upon the floor; or to the disreputable appearance of the castors, which were all at sixes and sevens, and looked drunk; or to the further blockade of Traddles by wandering vegetable dishes and jugs.
David Copperfield - Chapter 44
By Charles Dickens Context
blossomspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. reproductive organ of plants, especially one having showy or colorful parts
The humming of the bees in the blossoms mingled with the chanting voice and drowsily melted into a doze.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 23
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
It did not appear to me that he took much notice of it, but before he went he asked my mother to give him a bit of the blossom.
David Copperfield - Chapter 2
By Charles Dickens Context
And she thought with a tingling in her heart how she and Ashley might ride swiftly through this beauty of blossom and greenery this very afternoon, or tonight by moonlight, toward Jonesboro and a preacher.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 5
By Margaret Mitche Context
bluffspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. pretense of strength; mislead or deceive
I fetched the shore a half a mile above the village, and then went scooting along the bluff bank in the easy water.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Chapter 24
By Mark Twain Context
He stands before me again, his bluff hairy face irradiating with a joyful love and pride, for which I can find no description.
David Copperfield - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
Then Tom tumbled his ham over the bluff and let himself down after it, tearing both skin and clothes to some extent in the effort.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 13
By Mark Twain Context
blunderspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. serious mistake typically caused by ignorance or confusion
The task was done, not free from further blunders; but the pupil claimed a reward, and received at least five kisses; which, however, he generously returned.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 32
By Emily Bronte Context
He had remained in Shropshire, lamenting the blindness of his own pride, and the blunders of his own calculations, till at once released from Louisa by the astonishing and felicitous intelligence of her engagement with Benwick.
Persuasion - Chapter 23
By Jane Austen Context
bluntspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. having a dull edge or end; not sharp; lacking in feeling; insensitive
It is a Yorkshire habit to say what you think with blunt frankness, and old Ben Weatherstaff was a Yorkshire moor man.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 4
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
She had been struck with something blunt and heavy, on the head and spine; after the blows were dealt, something heavy had been thrown down at her with considerable violence, as she lay on her face.
Great Expectations - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
blusterspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. blow in heavy gusts; speak in a loudly arrogant or bullying manner
Bounderby carried it off in these terms, holding the door open for the company to depart, there was a blustering sheepishness upon him, at once extremely crestfallen and superlatively absurd.
Hard Times - Chapter 24
By Charles Dickens Context
bogglespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. hesitate as if in fear or doubt; shy away or be overcome with fright or astonishment
bonanzaspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. boom; rich mine, vein, or pocket of ore; sudden opportunity to make money
bonusspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. an extra dividend to the shareholders; money paid in addition to a stated compensation
boycottspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. refrain from buying or using
brawlspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. fight; noisy quarrel or fight; loud party
It was during one of these brawls that Stuart Tarleton had shot Cade Calvert and Tony Fontaine had shot Brent.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
breachspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. breaking of contract or duty
There was little difficulty in entering the grounds, for unrepaired breaches gaped in the old park wall.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
If, as I imagine, there is no breach of the law in this matter, you can absolutely depend upon my discretion and my cooperation in keeping the facts out of the papers.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Between these two proud persons, mother and son, there is a wider breach than before, and little hope of its healing, for they are one at heart, and time makes each more obstinate and imperious.
David Copperfield - Chapter 46
By Charles Dickens Context
breadthspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. measure or dimension from side to side; width; extent
So tall was he that his hat actually brushed the cross bar of the doorway, and his breadth seemed to span it across from side to side.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The present Catherine has no other likeness to her, except a breadth of forehead, and a certain arch of the nostril that makes her appear rather haughty, whether she will or not.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 33
By Emily Bronte Context
While we were still on our way to those detached apartments across the paved yard at the back, he asked me how often I had seen Miss Havisham eat and drink; offering me a breadth of choice, as usual, between a hundred times and once.
Great Expectations - Chapter 29
By Charles Dickens Context
brittlespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. easily broken; having little elasticity
Aunt Pauline and her husband, a little old man, with a formal, brittle courtesy and the absent air of one living in an older age, lived on a plantation on the river, far more isolated than Tara.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 7
By Margaret Mitche Context
calculatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. compute; determine; estimate
Once received, it is a haunting idea; how many undesigning persons I suspected of watching me, it would be hard to calculate.
Great Expectations - Chapter 46
By Charles Dickens Context
During the whole of that day they struggled on through the defiles, and by evening they calculated that they were more than thirty miles from their enemies.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
After some words apart between the last comer and Fagin, they drew their chairs towards the fire; and the Jew, telling Oliver to come and sit by him, led the conversation to the topics most calculated to interest his hearers.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context