7th Grade Spelling Words With Definition

Grade 7: With Definition - 3
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 Grade 7: With Definition - 3
decoratespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. add something to an object or place, especially in order to make it more attractive
The girls could never be brought to respect tradition in designing and decorating the armour; they insisted on attaching loops and bows of silk and velvet in any situation pleasing to their taste.
Return of the Native - Chapter 15
By Thomas Hardy Context
The green eyes in the carefully sweet face were turbulent, willful, lusty with life, distinctly at variance with her decorous demeanor.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 1
By Margaret Mitche Context
A lady so decorous in herself, and so highly connected, was not to be suspected of dropping over the banisters or sliding down them, yet her extraordinary facility of locomotion suggested the wild idea.
Hard Times - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
defectivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. having a faulty; imperfect or incomplete
Papa talks enough of my defects, and shows enough scorn of me, to make it natural I should doubt myself.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 24
By Emily Bronte Context
Well, I ought to turn that defect to advantage, and by being able to do without what other people require I can spend what such things cost upon anybody else.
Return of the Native - Chapter 21
By Thomas Hardy Context
As a house, Barton Cottage, though small, was comfortable and compact; but as a cottage it was defective, for the building was regular, the roof was tiled, the window shutters were not painted green, nor were the walls covered with honeysuckles.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 6
By Jane Austen Context
definitespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. fixed, certain, or clear; having distinct limits
Wickham�when she read with somewhat clearer attention a relation of events which, if true, must overthrow every cherished opinion of his worth, and which bore so alarming an affinity to his own history of himself�her feelings were yet more acutely painful and more difficult of definition.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 36
By Jane Austen Context
She did not know what she was looking for, or at, very definitely, yet she moved the lamp till it shone full on her.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 7
By D H Lawrence Context
The destination of the proposed railroad, Tennessee and the West, was clear and definite, but its beginning point in Georgia was somewhat uncertain until, a year later, an engineer drove a stake in the red clay to mark the southern end of the line, and Atlanta, born Terminus, had begun.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 8
By Margaret Mitche Context
denominatorspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. the divisor of a fraction; the number below the line in a fraction
It is not there that respectable people of any denomination can do most good; and it certainly is not there that the influence of the clergy can be most felt.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 9
By Jane Austen Context
He was for any description of policy, in the compass of a week; and nailed all sorts of colours to every denomination of mast.
David Copperfield - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
descendspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. move downward and lower; come from
v. be connected by a relationship of blood
He lighted his lantern from that which Monks had detached from the rope, and now carried in his hand; and making no effort to prolong the discourse, descended in silence, followed by his wife.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
Neither, as she approached her old home now, did any of the best influences of old home descend upon her.
Hard Times - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
The turnkey laughed, and gave us good day, and stood laughing at us over the spikes of the wicket when we descended the steps into the street.
Great Expectations - Chapter 32
By Charles Dickens Context
desperatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. having lost all hope; very serious or bad
The sort of desperate calmness with which this was said, lasted no longer than while she spoke, and was immediately followed by a return of the same excessive affliction.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 29
By Jane Austen Context
Very little was said by either; Kitty was too much afraid of him to talk; Elizabeth was secretly forming a desperate resolution; and perhaps he might be doing the same.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 58
By Jane Austen Context
Would they only have gone away, and left her in the quiet possession of that room it would have been her cure; but to have them all standing or waiting around her was distracting, and in desperation, she said she would go home.
Persuasion - Chapter 23
By Jane Austen Context
developspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. grow or change into a more advanced, larger, or stronger form
v. invent something or bring something into existence
Robins are not like human beings; their muscles are always exercised from the first and so they develop themselves in a natural manner.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 25
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
Yet Yeobright was as firm in the contrary intention as if the tendency of marriage were rather to develop the fantasies of young philanthropy than to sweep them away.
Return of the Native - Chapter 28
By Thomas Hardy Context
Common sense told them that unless Ashley developed wings, it would be weeks or even months before he could travel from Illinois to Georgia, but hearts nevertheless beat wildly whenever a soldier turned into the avenue at Tara.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 30
By Margaret Mitche Context
dieselspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a type of heavy oil used as fuel
digestionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. process by which food is converted into substances that can be absorbed by the body
Scarlett digested this in silence, for she had never before been under the same roof with anyone who was not received.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 6
By Margaret Mitche Context
If I could be less affectionate and sensitive, I should have a better digestion and an iron set of nerves.
Great Expectations - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
dilemmaspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a situation in which a difficult choice has to be made between two different things
There would have been the same inequality of lot, the same heaping up of favours here, of contumely there, the same generosity before justice, the same perpetual dilemmas, the same captious alteration of caresses and blows that we endure now.
Return of the Native - Chapter 7
By Thomas Hardy Context
If you will advise me, knowing my feeble powers such as they are, how you think it will be best to exert them in a dilemma so unwonted, you will add another friendly obligation to the many you have already rendered me.
David Copperfield - Chapter 42
By Charles Dickens Context
In a few hours the examination would commence, and he was still in the dilemma between making the facts public and allowing the culprit to compete for the valuable scholarship.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
disciplinespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. training that makes people more willing to obey or more able to control themselves
n. a particular area of study, especially a subject studied at a college
But she was going as a sort of discipline: and also because, if she had a child, Clifford could think she had a lover in Venice.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 11
By D H Lawrence Context
She had borne eight children, as red of hair and as full of life as she, and had raised them most successfully, so the County said, because she gave them all the loving neglect and the stern discipline she gave the colts she bred.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 5
By Margaret Mitche Context
What I had to do, was, to turn the painful discipline of my younger days to account, by going to work with a resolute and steady heart.
David Copperfield - Chapter 36
By Charles Dickens Context
discreetspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. careful not to cause embarrassment or attract a lot of attention; distinguishable
To this point he has been discreet in dreading to provoke me; you must represent the peril of quitting that policy, and remind him of my passionate temper, verging, when kindled, on frenzy.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 11
By Emily Bronte Context
At the party tonight, women would gather in corners and whisper discreetly and with malicious pleasure.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 53
By Margaret Mitche Context
James Harthouse, with a discreet use of his blue coaching, came off triumphantly, though with a considerable accession of boredom.
Hard Times - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
discretespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. clearly separate or different in shape or form; consisting of unconnected distinct parts
For the comfort of her children, had she consulted only her own wishes, she would have kept it; but the discretion of Elinor prevailed.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 5
By Jane Austen Context
We may as well wait, perhaps, till the circumstance occurs before we discuss the discretion of his behaviour thereupon.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 10
By Jane Austen Context
Mr and Mrs Musgrove, either from seeing little, or from an entire confidence in the discretion of both their daughters, and of all the young men who came near them, seemed to leave everything to take its chance.
Persuasion - Chapter 9
By Jane Austen Context
diseasespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. illness of people, animals, plants, etc
I fancied the discontent of age and disease arose from his family disagreements; as he would have it that it did: really, you know, sir, it was in his sinking frame.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 5
By Emily Bronte Context
He already showed that thought is a disease of flesh, and indirectly bore evidence that ideal physical beauty is incompatible with emotional development and a full recognition of the coil of things.
Return of the Native - Chapter 17
By Thomas Hardy Context
When your mother took to her bed she bade me write you that under no condition were you to come home and expose yourself and Wade to the disease.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 20
By Margaret Mitche Context
disentanglespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. separate things that have become joined or confused
disguisespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. dress or exterior put on for purposes of concealment or of deception
Though Eustacia could not eat without uncovering her face she could drink easily enough beneath her disguise.
Return of the Native - Chapter 17
By Thomas Hardy Context
Perhaps this concealment, this disguise was beneath me; it is done, however, and it was done for the best.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 35
By Jane Austen Context
Fanny looked on and listened, not unamused to observe the selfishness which, more or less disguised, seemed to govern them all, and wondering how it would end.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 14
By Jane Austen Context
dishonorspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a feeling of embarrassment and loss of people's respect
disinfectantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. substance which kills germs or viruses; agent for removing the causes of infection
distractspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. make someone stop giving their attention to something
With her attention not a little distracted by these and a great many other incoherent exclamations of joy, Rose read the address, which was Craven Street, in the Strand.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 41
By Charles Dickens Context
She hurried by the train to town, she ran from town to this house, through a raging storm, and presented herself before me in a state of distraction.
Hard Times - Chapter 23
By Charles Dickens Context
It would seem a simple matter to decide on these precautions; but in my dazed, not to say distracted, state, it took so long, that I did not get out to further them until two or three in the afternoon.
Great Expectations - Chapter 40
By Charles Dickens Context
disturbspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. upset or bother; trouble emotionally or mentally; put out of order
The surgeon shook his head, in a manner which intimated that he feared it was very possible; and observing that they might disturb the patient, led the way into an adjoining apartment.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 30
By Charles Dickens Context
The noise of the rain did not disturb him much; but it attracted his attention sufficiently to make him raise his head sometimes, as if he were rather remonstrating with the elements.
Hard Times - Chapter 21
By Charles Dickens Context
Her sight was disturbed, so that she saw objects multiplied, and grasped at visionary teacups and wineglasses instead of the realities; her hearing was greatly impaired; her memory also; and her speech was unintelligible.
Great Expectations - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
doublespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. twice the size, amount, price, etc.
n. a person who looks exactly the same as someone else
She had some reason to put the question, for shame and pride threw double gloom over his countenance, and kept him immovable.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 7
By Emily Bronte Context
The qualifications which frequently invest the facade of a prison with far more dignity than is found in the facade of a palace double its size lent to this heath a sublimity in which spots renowned for beauty of the accepted kind are utterly wanting.
Return of the Native - Chapter 1
By Thomas Hardy Context
His accompanying them was a double advantage; she felt all the compliment it offered to herself, and it was most acceptable as an occasion of introducing him to her father and mother.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 21
By Jane Austen Context
doubtspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. not being certain about something, especially about how good or true it is
I had little doubt that I had come to the end of my career when I perceived the somewhat sinister figure of the late Professor Moriarty standing upon the narrow pathway which led to safety.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I have no doubt that this woman had plunged him over head and ears in debt, and so led him into this miserable plot.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
But for the trained reasoner to admit such intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperament was to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon all his mental results.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
doughnutspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a small ring-shaped fried cake
dungeonspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a dark cell, usually underground, where prisoners can be confined
n. an underground prison
easelspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. an upright tripod for displaying something, usually an artist's canvas
elegantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. refined and tasteful in style or behavior
Since the death of her husband, who had traded with success in a less elegant part of the town, she had resided every winter in a house in one of the streets near Portman Square.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 25
By Jane Austen Context
Bingley by a housemaid, and some time afterwards from the two elegant ladies who waited on his sisters.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 9
By Jane Austen Context
Mr and Mrs Musgrove were a very good sort of people; friendly and hospitable, not much educated, and not at all elegant.
Persuasion - Chapter 5
By Jane Austen Context
elementaryspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. easily dealt with; straightforward and fundamental
Before turning to those moral and mental aspects of the matter which present the greatest difficulties, let the enquirer begin by mastering more elementary problems.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
embarrassmentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a feeling of self-consciousness, shame, or awkwardness
From Willoughby their expression was at first held back, by the embarrassment which the remembrance of his assistance created.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 10
By Jane Austen Context
As for the gentleman himself, his feelings were chiefly expressed, not by embarrassment or dejection, or by trying to avoid her, but by stiffness of manner and resentful silence.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 21
By Jane Austen Context
Situated as we are with Lady Dalrymple, cousins, we ought to be very careful not to embarrass her with acquaintance she might not approve.
Persuasion - Chapter 18
By Jane Austen Context
emigratespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. remove from one country to another, for the purpose of residence; migrate from home
The family, as emigrants, being objects of some interest in and about Hungerford, attracted so many beholders, that we were glad to take refuge in their room.
David Copperfield - Chapter 57
By Charles Dickens Context
encounterspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. confront or meet, especially unexpectedly
Every member of the respectable coterie appeared plunged in his own reflections; not excepting the dog, who by a certain malicious licking of his lips seemed to be meditating an attack upon the legs of the first gentleman or lady he might encounter in the streets when he went out.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 13
By Charles Dickens Context
The object of his miserable existence was to prevent its recognition by any one among the various people he encountered.
Hard Times - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
It was characteristic of the police people that they had all more or less suspected poor Joe (though he never knew it), and that they had to a man concurred in regarding him as one of the deepest spirits they had ever encountered.
Great Expectations - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
enemyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a person who hates or opposes another person and tries to harm that person
n. an opposing military force
Such were the circumstances of the Park Lane Mystery, which were further complicated by entire absence of motive, since, as I have said, young Adair was not known to have any enemy, and no attempt had been made to remove the money or valuables in the room.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
When the fighting was over there was no one left of our enemies except just the warders, the mates, and the doctor.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He was not a popular man, being somewhat cold and forbidding in his manners, but he had, as far as I know, no active enemies.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
enlightenspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. supply with light; illuminate
v. make clear to the intellect or conscience; give information to
As we walked home, I would fain have enlightened my charge on the characters of the people we had quitted: but she got it into her head that I was prejudiced against them.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 21
By Emily Bronte Context
Thursday was the day of the ball; and on Wednesday morning Fanny, still unable to satisfy herself as to what she ought to wear, determined to seek the counsel of the more enlightened, and apply to Mrs.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 26
By Jane Austen Context
The subject matter of this conference was not disclosed in the parlour, but the kitchen was speedily enlightened concerning it; for Mr.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 34
By Charles Dickens Context
entrancespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a door, gate, etc. by which you can enter a building or place
On each side of the entrance was a sitting room, about sixteen feet square; and beyond them were the offices and the stairs.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 6
By Jane Austen Context
Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien, and the report which was in general circulation within five minutes after his entrance, of his having ten thousand a year.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 3
By Jane Austen Context
She was sent back, however, in a moment by the entrance of Captain Wentworth himself, among a party of gentlemen and ladies, evidently his acquaintance, and whom he must have joined a little below Milsom Street.
Persuasion - Chapter 19
By Jane Austen Context
envelopspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. cover or encase something completely
The papers had been made up into sealed envelopes, one or two of which had been opened by the police.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Two days later he received a bulky envelope, which contained a short note from the detective, and a typewritten document, which covered several pages of foolscap.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
For a long time he remained there, turning over the leaves and dried sticks, gathering up what seemed to me to be dust into an envelope and examining with his lens not only the ground but even the bark of the tree as far as he could reach.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
envelopespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a flat, usually rectangular, container for a letter or thin package
n. any wrapper or covering
If by the aid of the powers which you are said to possess you can find such an envelope as I describe with its enclosure, you will have deserved well of your country, and earned any reward which it lies in our power to bestow.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 13
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Two days later he received a bulky envelope, which contained a short note from the detective, and a typewritten document, which covered several pages of foolscap.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
For a long time he remained there, turning over the leaves and dried sticks, gathering up what seemed to me to be dust into an envelope and examining with his lens not only the ground but even the bark of the tree as far as he could reach.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
environmentalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. relating to the natural world and the impact of human activity on its condition
a. relating to or arising from a person's surroundings
exaggeratespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. represent as greater than is actually the case; do something to an excessive degree
Then personal appearance sympathised with mental deterioration: he acquired a slouching gait and ignoble look; his naturally reserved disposition was exaggerated into an almost idiotic excess of unsociable moroseness; and he took a grim pleasure, apparently, in exciting the aversion rather than the esteem of his few acquaintances.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 8
By Emily Bronte Context
He had never caught even a glimpse of the boy and had heard a dozen exaggerated stories about his uncanny looks and ways and his insane tempers.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 20
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
She was therefore obliged to seek another branch of the subject, and related, with much bitterness of spirit and some exaggeration, the shocking rudeness of Mr.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 3
By Jane Austen Context
excellencespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. the quality of being outstanding or extremely good
n. an outstanding feature
Sharp at the hour named Inspector Stanley Hopkins appeared, and we sat down together to the excellent breakfast which Mrs.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Farquhar, from whom I purchased it, had at one time an excellent general practice; but his age, and an affliction of the nature of St.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
No, sir, I think that, with your permission, I will confine my attentions to the excellent bird which I perceive upon the sideboard.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
excludespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. prevent something from entering a place or taking part in an activity; reject
Heathcliff shunned meeting us at meals; yet he would not consent formally to exclude Hareton and Cathy.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 34
By Emily Bronte Context
He was shut up in a room from which all light was excluded, and his condition would have been one of absolute misery had not Eustacia read to him by the glimmer of a shaded lamp.
Return of the Native - Chapter 29
By Thomas Hardy Context
She had come to Bath on that account, and was now in lodgings near the hot baths, living in a very humble way, unable even to afford herself the comfort of a servant, and of course almost excluded from society.
Persuasion - Chapter 17
By Jane Austen Context
exhalespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. breathe out; send air out of lungs
The sombre stretch of rounds and hollows seemed to rise and meet the evening gloom in pure sympathy, the heath exhaling darkness as rapidly as the heavens precipitated it.
Return of the Native - Chapter 1
By Thomas Hardy Context
I beat the prison dust off my feet as I sauntered to and fro, and I shook it out of my dress, and I exhaled its air from my lungs.
Great Expectations - Chapter 32
By Charles Dickens Context
exhaustionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. the state of being extremely tired
Trembling in every joint, from cold and exhaustion, he made an effort to stand upright; but, shuddering from head to foot, fell prostrate on the ground.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 28
By Charles Dickens Context
He stood whistling to himself with all imaginable coolness, with his hat still on, and a certain air of exhaustion upon him, in part arising from excessive summer, and in part from excessive gentility.
Hard Times - Chapter 15
By Charles Dickens Context
When at last I dozed, in sheer exhaustion of mind and body, it became a vast shadowy verb which I had to conjugate.
Great Expectations - Chapter 45
By Charles Dickens Context
expensivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. high in price or charging high prices; costing a lot of money
He has had his little smile at our expense, and perhaps we may do as much by him, if my reading of this problem proves to be correct.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
As you will readily understand, a specialist who aims high is compelled to start in one of a dozen streets in the Cavendish Square quarter, all of which entail enormous rents and furnishing expenses.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
If this man could afford to buy so expensive a hat three years ago, and has had no hat since, then he has assuredly gone down in the world.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
expertspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. person with a high degree of skill in a certain subject
Tarleton, running her eyes over her with the expert air of one who calculated a pregnancy to the last minute of its length.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 40
By Margaret Mitche Context
This preliminary proceeding laying bare his head, the expert lady, clasping him tightly round the throat with one hand, inflicted a shower of blows (dealt with singular vigour and dexterity) upon it with the other.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 37
By Charles Dickens Context
A scientific expert would pronounce at once that this was drawn up on a suburban line, since nowhere save in the immediate vicinity of a great city could there be so quick a succession of points.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
explorespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. investigate systematically; search and discover about something
He had indeed begun to wonder if it might not be wise to send some one out to explore the garden paths.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 23
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
Elizabeth longed to explore its windings; but when they had crossed the bridge, and perceived their distance from the house, Mrs.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 43
By Jane Austen Context
I found the same gate open, and I explored the garden, and even looked in at the windows of the detached house; but my view was suddenly stopped by the closed shutters within, and all was lifeless.
Great Expectations - Chapter 12
By Charles Dickens Context
exquisitespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. very beautiful and delicate; excellent and flawless
With streaming face and an expression of agony, Linton had thrown his nerveless frame along the ground: he seemed convulsed with exquisite terror.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 27
By Emily Bronte Context
Obstacles were a ripening sun to his love, and he was at this moment in a delirium of exquisite misery.
Return of the Native - Chapter 30
By Thomas Hardy Context
And in short, he had looked and said everything with such exquisite grace, that they could assure them all, their heads were both turned by him; and off they ran, quite as full of glee as of love, and apparently more full of Captain Wentworth than of little Charles.
Persuasion - Chapter 7
By Jane Austen Context
familiarspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. well known or easily recognized
His name was familiar to me, for many years ago my parents were acquainted with him, but they drifted apart.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Though most of the facts were familiar to me, I had not sufficiently appreciated their relative importance, nor their connection to each other.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
My suspicions were all confirmed by his peculiar action in typewriting his signature, which, of course, inferred that his handwriting was so familiar to her that she would recognise even the smallest sample of it.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
fascinatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. cause to be interested or curious; interest someone a lot; captivate
It was a curiously entertaining morning and the feeling of wandering about in the same house with other people but at the same time feeling as if one were miles away from them was a fascinating thing.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 25
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
The power of her face all lost, the charm of her emotions all disguised, the fascinations of her coquetry denied existence, nothing but a voice left to her; she had a sense of the doom of Echo.
Return of the Native - Chapter 17
By Thomas Hardy Context
Clifford fascinated her because he always, or so often, frustrated her will, as if by a finer instinct.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 9
By D H Lawrence Context
fatiguespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. physical or mental weariness; exhaustion
Whatever be his pursuits, his eagerness in them should know no moderation, and leave him no sense of fatigue.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 9
By Jane Austen Context
Hurst and her sister scarcely opened their mouths, except to complain of fatigue, and were evidently impatient to have the house to themselves.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 18
By Jane Austen Context
She was in the carriage, and felt that he had placed her there, that his will and his hands had done it, that she owed it to his perception of her fatigue, and his resolution to give her rest.
Persuasion - Chapter 10
By Jane Austen Context
fictitiousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. existing only in imagination; feigned; not true or real
financialspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. monetary; relating to money matters
For some time back Mawson & Williams, the famous financial house, have been the guardians of securities which amount in the aggregate to a sum of considerably over a million sterling.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
A short railway journey and a shorter walk brought us to Fairbank, the modest residence of the great financier.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context