7th Grade Spelling Words With Definition

Grade 7: With Definition - 1
This is 7th Grade spelling vocabulary (1) and definitions. Some words has example sentences selected from classic literature. To help study and review these words, the vocabulary integrates training tools. E.g., online spelling practice and word meaning single choice quiz are available for each word in Grade 7.
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 Grade 7: With Definition - 1
absolutelyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
ad. completely or definitely; used as a strong way of saying 'yes'
It gave to his intentions whatever of decision was wanting before; and he finally resolved, that it would be absolutely unnecessary, if not highly indecorous, to do more for the widow and children of his father, than such kind of neighbourly acts as his own wife pointed out.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 2
By Jane Austen Context
That the Miss Lucases and the Miss Bennets should meet to talk over a ball was absolutely necessary; and the morning after the assembly brought the former to Longbourn to hear and to communicate.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 5
By Jane Austen Context
My heart bled for you, as I talked of happiness; and yet he is sensible, he is agreeable, and with such a woman as you, it was not absolutely hopeless.
Persuasion - Chapter 21
By Jane Austen Context
acceptspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. agree to take something
v. believe that something is true
In a week or two, I suppose, we shall be going; and, I trust, Edward will not be very unwilling to accept the charge.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 35
By Jane Austen Context
Bingley was obliged to be in town the following day, and, consequently, unable to accept the honour of their invitation, etc.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 3
By Jane Austen Context
I only mean that if Mr Elliot should some time hence pay his addresses to you, and if you should be disposed to accept him, I think there would be every possibility of your being happy together.
Persuasion - Chapter 17
By Jane Austen Context
accessspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. method or possibility of getting near to a place or person
n. entry or entrance
James Harthouse, with a discreet use of his blue coaching, came off triumphantly, though with a considerable accession of boredom.
Hard Times - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
My father had left a small collection of books in a little room upstairs, to which I had access (for it adjoined my own) and which nobody else in our house ever troubled.
David Copperfield - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
By means of this I had access to at least one spot in this great city where I could rely upon being free from interruption.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 13
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
accessoryspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. additional object; useful but not essential thing; subordinate or supplementary item
Though she was no lover of money she loved what money could bring; and the new accessories she imagined around him clothed Wildeve with a great deal of interest.
Return of the Native - Chapter 35
By Thomas Hardy Context
You were not an accessory, therefore, and she came, so far as I can read the evidence, without your knowledge to rob you.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
William was decoyed up and shot, and had they only got the whole of the note and paid a little more attention to detail in the accessories, it is very possible that suspicion might never have been aroused.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
accomplishspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. succeed in doing; bring to pass; achieve; reach the end of; complete
It was not that I wished to live for my own sake, but it was that I desired to accomplish my purpose.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Even the knowledge that he had succeeded where the police of three countries had failed, and that he had outmanœuvred at every point the most accomplished swindler in Europe, was insufficient to rouse him from his nervous prostration.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I felt, however, that when Whitney was once confined in the cab my mission was practically accomplished; and for the rest, I could not wish anything better than to be associated with my friend in one of those singular adventures which were the normal condition of his existence.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 6
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
achievespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. gain with effort; accomplish; fulfill
He spoke these words, holding the door open for his son to pass, and the latter achieved his exit exactly as a spaniel might which suspected the person who attended on it of designing a spiteful squeeze.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 27
By Emily Bronte Context
But the Turkish Knight was denied even the chance of achieving this by the fluttering ribbons which she dared not brush aside.
Return of the Native - Chapter 17
By Thomas Hardy Context
For she only had to hold herself back in sexual intercourse, and let him finish and expend himself without herself coming to the crisis: and then she could prolong the connexion and achieve her orgasm and her crisis while he was merely her tool.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 1
By D H Lawrence Context
activatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. make active or more active; stimulate
With Hareton the resemblance is carried farther: it is singular at all times, then it was particularly striking; because his senses were alert, and his mental faculties wakened to unwonted activity.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 33
By Emily Bronte Context
Then came the incident of that day, and the reddleman, still loving her well, was excited by this accidental service to her at a critical juncture to vow an active devotion to her cause, instead of, as hitherto, sighing and holding aloof.
Return of the Native - Chapter 9
By Thomas Hardy Context
In the promotion of this object she was zealously active, as far as her ability reached; and missed no opportunity of projecting weddings among all the young people of her acquaintance.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 8
By Jane Austen Context
addressspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. number of the house, name of the road and town where a person lives or works
v. make a formal speech to; deal with or discuss
Harding, of Harding Brothers, said that they had sold you their last copy, and he gave me your address.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
This quarrel had put a stop to all communications for some months, so that if Browner had occasion to address a packet to Miss Sarah, he would undoubtedly have done so to her old address.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
He was very willing to have a holiday, so we shut the business up and started off for the address that was given us in the advertisement.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
adequatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. sufficient; enough to meet a purpose
The number of their years may have adequately summed up Jared, Mahalaleel, and the rest of the antediluvians, but the age of a modern man is to be measured by the intensity of his history.
Return of the Native - Chapter 17
By Thomas Hardy Context
Her legal allowance was not adequate to her fortune, nor sufficient for her comfortable maintenance, and I learnt from my brother that the power of receiving it had been made over some months before to another person.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 31
By Jane Austen Context
There was a nibble of the tough old bird for each, an adequate amount of dressing made of corn meal and seasoned with onions, a bowl of dried peas, and plenty of rice and gravy, the latter somewhat watery, for there was no flour with which to thicken it.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 17
By Margaret Mitche Context
admirespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. regard with wonder or astonishment; view with surprise
Corney; which proceeding, some prudent readers will doubtless be disposed to admire, and to consider an act of great heroism on Mr.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 23
By Charles Dickens Context
Bounderby, was sufficient to stun this admirable lady again without collision between herself and any other fact.
Hard Times - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
Miss Havisham gives you to him, as the greatest slight and injury that could be done to the many far better men who admire you, and to the few who truly love you.
Great Expectations - Chapter 44
By Charles Dickens Context
affectionatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. having affection or warm regard; loving or fond; kindly inclined
He was still the same gentle, attached, affectionate creature that he had been when pain and suffering had wasted his strength, and when he was dependent for every slight attention, and comfort on those who tended him.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 33
By Charles Dickens Context
I said all the affectionate things to him that came into my heart, and presently he was quiet and I sat down by him, and told him all about the school and everything that had been said and done there.
Hard Times - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
If I could be less affectionate and sensitive, I should have a better digestion and an iron set of nerves.
Great Expectations - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
affordspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. pay or provide; have the financial means for; bear the cost of
Brownlow looked around the office as if in search of some person who would afford him the required information.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
The performance seemed a little long to Sissy and Louisa, particularly when it stopped to afford the Clown an opportunity of telling Mr.
Hard Times - Chapter 25
By Charles Dickens Context
My lavish habits led his easy nature into expenses that he could not afford, corrupted the simplicity of his life, and disturbed his peace with anxieties and regrets.
Great Expectations - Chapter 34
By Charles Dickens Context
alienatespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. cause to become unfriendly or hostile; cause someone to stop supporting and agreeing with you
To me, he signified the threatening danger was not so much death, as permanent alienation of intellect.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 12
By Emily Bronte Context
The time at any moment was a number of varying doctrines professed by the different hamlets, some of them having originally grown up from a common root, and then become divided by secession, some having been alien from the beginning.
Return of the Native - Chapter 16
By Thomas Hardy Context
It is, in short, impossible for us to conjecture the causes or circumstances which may have alienated them, without actual blame on either side.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 17
By Jane Austen Context
alligatorspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a large reptile with a hard skin that lives in and near rivers and lakes
Americanspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. someone from USA
a. of or relating to the USA
But already Paris was full of Americans and English, strange Americans in the oddest uniforms, and the usual dreary English that are so hopeless abroad.
Lady Chatterley's Lover - Chapter 17
By D H Lawrence Context
True, they had lived in Georgia for seventy years and, before that, had spent a generation in the Carolinas; but the first of the family who set foot on American shores had come from Ulster, and that was enough for Gerald.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 3
By Margaret Mitche Context
The American, Abe Slaney, was condemned to death at the winter assizes at Norwich, but his penalty was changed to penal servitude in consideration of mitigating circumstances, and the certainty that Hilton Cubitt had fired the first shot.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
announcespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. make something known or tell people about something officially; proclaim
Before noon, you announce that you are going to do me the honour of accompanying me as far as I go, on your road to London.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 36
By Charles Dickens Context
I seem to be protesting that I am a sort of good fellow, when, upon my honour, I have not the least intention to make any protestation to that effect, and openly announce that I am nothing of the sort.
Hard Times - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
Not to get up a mystery with these people, I resolved to announce in the morning that my uncle had unexpectedly come from the country.
Great Expectations - Chapter 40
By Charles Dickens Context
antidotespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. medicine to counteract a poison or disease; agent that relieves or counteracts
anxiousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. worried and nervous; uneasy about an uncertain event or matter
Now, if, during this brief period, Oliver had been surrounded by careful grandmothers, anxious aunts, experienced nurses, and doctors of profound wisdom, he would most inevitably and indubitably have been killed in no time.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 1
By Charles Dickens Context
The bearers being now ready to carry him away, and the surgeon being anxious for his removal, those who had torches or lanterns, prepared to go in front of the litter.
Hard Times - Chapter 25
By Charles Dickens Context
There were some people slinking about as usual when we passed out into the street, who were evidently anxious to speak with him; but there was something so conclusive in the halo of scented soap which encircled his presence, that they gave it up for that day.
Great Expectations - Chapter 26
By Charles Dickens Context
apiecespeak speak spelling word quiz 
ad. to or from every one of two or more
Then, he melted into parental tenderness, and gave them a shilling apiece and told them to go and play; and then as they went out, with one very strong effort to lift himself up by the hair he dismissed the hopeless subject.
Great Expectations - Chapter 23
By Charles Dickens Context
apparentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. capable of being seen, or easily seen; open to view; visible to eye
An apparent clue was at once obtained, since a boy and a young man were reported to have been seen leaving a neighbouring station by an early train.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
On emptying this, Miss Cushing was horrified to find two human ears, apparently quite freshly severed.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Our visitor glanced with some apparent surprise at the languid, lounging figure of the man who had been no doubt depicted to him as the most incisive reasoner and most energetic agent in Europe.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
appearancespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. an occasion when someone appears in public
n. formal attendance in court or at a hearing
Up to this point the incident bore the appearance of an ordinary accident, but fresh indications seem to point to serious crime.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Back came an answer by return, saying that if I would appear next Monday I might take over my new duties at once, provided that my appearance was satisfactory.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Boots which extended halfway up his calves, and which were trimmed at the tops with rich brown fur, completed the impression of barbaric opulence which was suggested by his whole appearance.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
appetizerspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a small amount of food eaten before a meal
appreciativespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. showing to understand how good something is
a. being grateful for something
By this curious turn of disposition I have gained the reputation of deliberate heartlessness; how undeserved, I alone can appreciate.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 1
By Emily Bronte Context
Hence it may be that the face of an old man, who had like others been called to the heights by the rising flames, was not really the mere nose and chin that it appeared to be, but an appreciable quantity of human countenance.
Return of the Native - Chapter 3
By Thomas Hardy Context
Excepting one short period of her life, she had never, since the age of fourteen, never since the loss of her dear mother, known the happiness of being listened to, or encouraged by any just appreciation or real taste.
Persuasion - Chapter 6
By Jane Austen Context
apprenticeshipspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. term during which one learns a trade from skilled worke
Never has that curtain dropped so heavy and blank, as when my way in life lay stretched out straight before me through the newly entered road of apprenticeship to Joe.
Great Expectations - Chapter 14
By Charles Dickens Context
aptitudespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. inherent ability
n. quickness in learning and understanding
He found poker the most useful of all Southern customs, poker and a steady head for whisky; and it was his natural aptitude for cards and amber liquor that brought to Gerald two of his three most prized possessions, his valet and his plantation.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 3
By Margaret Mitche Context
It was after tea on a summer evening, and the conversation, which had roamed in a desultory, spasmodic fashion from golf clubs to the causes of the change in the obliquity of the ecliptic, came round at last to the question of atavism and hereditary aptitudes.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 10
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
aquariumspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. tank or pool filled with water for keeping live fish and underwater animals
archaeologyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. study of artifacts and relics of early mankind
arraignmentspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a legal document calling someone to court to answer an indictment
artificialspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. made by humans; produced rather than natural.
It was a large, handsome stone building, standing well on rising ground, and backed by a ridge of high woody hills; and in front, a stream of some natural importance was swelled into greater, but without any artificial appearance.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 43
By Jane Austen Context
She received no other answer, than an artificial, assenting smile, followed by a contemptuous glance, as he turned away, which Anne perfectly knew the meaning of.
Persuasion - Chapter 10
By Jane Austen Context
Fanny, in her pity and kindheartedness, was at great pains to teach him how to learn, giving him all the helps and directions in her power, trying to make an artificial memory for him, and learning every word of his part herself, but without his being much the forwarder.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 18
By Jane Austen Context
aspirinspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. white crystalline compound drug to relieve pain, and reduce fever and inflammation
assumespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. suppose to be the case, without proof
To all this information, much of which we already knew, Holmes listened with polite attention, but I, who knew him so well, could clearly see that his thoughts were elsewhere, and I detected a mixture of mingled uneasiness and expectation beneath that mask which he was wont to assume.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Everything which had been disconnected before began at once to assume its true place, and I had a shadowy presentiment of the whole sequence of events.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 8
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
His extreme love of solitude in England suggests the idea that he was in fear of someone or something, so we may assume as a working hypothesis that it was fear of someone or something which drove him from America.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
athleticspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. strong, healthy, and good at sports
The Athlete, the Lecturer, the Scientific Discoverer was a laughable, lovable, healthy young human thing.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 27
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
The lower of the three is Gilchrist, a fine scholar and athlete, plays in the Rugby team and the cricket team for the college, and got his Blue for the hurdles and the long jump.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Bar fencing and boxing I had few athletic tastes, and then my line of study was quite distinct from that of the other fellows, so that we had no points of contact at all.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
atmospherespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. air, the mixture of gases around the earth
The dismal spiritual atmosphere overcame, and more than neutralised, the glowing physical comforts round me; and I resolved to be cautious how I ventured under those rafters a third time.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 2
By Emily Bronte Context
There she stood still around her stretching the vast night atmosphere, whose incomplete darkness in comparison with the total darkness of the heath below it might have represented a venial beside a mortal sin.
Return of the Native - Chapter 6
By Thomas Hardy Context
I shall call hills steep, which ought to be bold; surfaces strange and uncouth, which ought to be irregular and rugged; and distant objects out of sight, which ought only to be indistinct through the soft medium of a hazy atmosphere.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 18
By Jane Austen Context
attitudespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a feeling or opinion about something or someone
His breast heaved; his attitude was erect; his eye bright and vivid; his whole person changed, as he stood glaring over the cowardly tormentor who now lay crouching at his feet; and defied him with an energy he had never known before.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 6
By Charles Dickens Context
As he recoiled, looking down at it, it raised itself up into the form of a woman in a sitting attitude.
Hard Times - Chapter 8
By Charles Dickens Context
You get at your mouth better (which after all is the object), and you save a good deal of the attitude of opening oysters, on the part of the right elbow.
Great Expectations - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
attorneyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. lawyer, one who is appointed by another to act in his place
Having received his orders, I despatched a man to fetch the attorney, and four more, provided with serviceable weapons, to demand my young lady of her jailor.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 28
By Emily Bronte Context
attractivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. very pleasing in appearance or sound; inviting or tempting
Wives, again, put on weeds for their husbands, as if, so far from grieving in the garb of sorrow, they had made up their minds to render it as becoming and attractive as possible.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 6
By Charles Dickens Context
Moreover, the healthy spirits who had mounted to this sublime height were attractive to many of the Gradgrind school.
Hard Times - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
I really believe Joe would have prolonged this word (mightily expressive to my mind of some architecture that I know) into a perfect Chorus, but for his attention being providentially attracted by his hat, which was toppling.
Great Expectations - Chapter 27
By Charles Dickens Context
autumnspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. the season when the leaves fall from the trees
Summer drew to an end, and early autumn: it was past Michaelmas, but the harvest was late that year, and a few of our fields were still uncleared.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 22
By Emily Bronte Context
If he did not come back until winter, or even autumn, there would be time to watch the secret garden come alive.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 12
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
Since the arrival of that letter, on a certain autumn morning long ago, the reddleman and Thomasin had not met till today.
Return of the Native - Chapter 9
By Thomas Hardy Context
averagespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a standard or level that is considered to be typical
n. result by adding two or more amounts and dividing by number of amounts:
For, I cannot adequately express what pain it gave me to think that Estella should show any favor to a contemptible, clumsy, sulky booby, so very far below the average.
Great Expectations - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
The order of the English letters after E is by no means well marked, and any preponderance which may be shown in an average of a printed sheet may be reversed in a single short sentence.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I may mention that her husband had left her comfortably off, and that she had a capital of about four thousand five hundred pounds, which had been so well invested by him that it returned an average of seven per cent.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
balletspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a sort of theatrical representation by dancers
bananaspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a long, curved fruit with a yellow skin and soft, sweet, white flesh inside
banquetspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. feast, entertainment of eating and drinking
This again was heightened by a certain gypsy character that set the banquet off; for while the table was, as Mr.
Great Expectations - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
barricadespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. obstacle; a line or pile of objects put together to stop people from going
We passed up the stair, unlocked the door, followed on down a passage, and found ourselves in front of the barricade which Miss Hunter had described.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
bazaarspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. an area of small shops and people selling things, especially in West and South Asia
Scarlett sat in the window of her bedroom that midsummer morning and disconsolately watched the wagons and carriages full of girls, soldiers and chaperons ride gaily out Peachtree road in search of woodland decorations for the bazaar which was to be held that evening for the benefit of the hospitals.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 9
By Margaret Mitche Context
Trabb had taken unto himself the best table, and had got all the leaves up, and was holding a kind of black Bazaar, with the aid of a quantity of black pins.
Great Expectations - Chapter 35
By Charles Dickens Context
I walked about the streets where the best shops for ladies were, I haunted the Bazaar like an unquiet spirit, I fagged through the Park again and again, long after I was quite knocked up.
David Copperfield - Chapter 26
By Charles Dickens Context
beliefspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. feeling of being certain that something exists or is true
He wants her much more than she wants him; and before I can encourage anything of the sort I must have a clear understanding from you that you will not interfere to injure an arrangement which I promote in the belief that it is for the best.
Return of the Native - Chapter 11
By Thomas Hardy Context
Sir John had dropped hints of past injuries and disappointments, which justified her belief of his being an unfortunate man, and she regarded him with respect and compassion.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 10
By Jane Austen Context
The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 24
By Jane Austen Context
besidesspeak speak spelling word quiz 
ad. over and above; in addition to; other than
Still, there are other gangs of three besides the Randalls, or it may be some new gang of which the police have never heard.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 12
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Besides this preliminary outlay, he must be prepared to keep himself for some years, and to hire a presentable carriage and horse.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 9
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
The fire was burning brightly, and in the grate there was a mass of black, fluffy ashes, as of burned paper, while the brass box stood open and empty beside it.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
bizarrespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. fantastic; very strange and unusuall in style or appearance
So, indeed, it proved, and as I come to the dark conclusion of a story which had seemed to me to be only childish and bizarre, I experience once again the dismay and horror with which I was filled.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Amid the action and reaction of so dense a swarm of humanity, every possible combination of events may be expected to take place, and many a little problem will be presented which may be striking and bizarre without being criminal.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 7
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
bombardspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. attack a place with continuous shooting or bombs
briefspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. short in time, duration, length, or extent; concise
He looked astonished at the expression my face assumed during a brief second: it was not horror, it was covetousness.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 13
By Emily Bronte Context
Dickon looked across the grass at the tree and Mary looked and there was a brief moment of stillness.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 21
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
All glances went through the window, and nobody noticed that Wildeve disguised a brief, telltale look.
Return of the Native - Chapter 5
By Thomas Hardy Context
brilliantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. full of light; shining or bright; sharp and clear in tone
The sun was shining inside the four walls and the high arch of blue sky over this particular piece of Misselthwaite seemed even more brilliant and soft than it was over the moor.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 9
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
Intensity was more usually reached by way of the solemn than by way of the brilliant, and such a sort of intensity was often arrived at during winter darkness, tempests, and mists.
Return of the Native - Chapter 1
By Thomas Hardy Context
Her skin was very brown, but, from its transparency, her complexion was uncommonly brilliant; her features were all good; her smile was sweet and attractive; and in her eyes, which were very dark, there was a life, a spirit, an eagerness, which could hardily be seen without delight.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 10
By Jane Austen Context
buffetspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. table with food set out for people to serve themselves
n. meal at which people help themselves to food that's been set out
It must mean that hollow shuddering sort of roar which rushed round and round the house as if the giant no one could see were buffeting it and beating at the walls and windows to try to break in.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 5
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
It seemed to me that he took all blows and buffets now with just the same air as he had taken mine then.
Great Expectations - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
It was twenty past three when we reached our terminus, and after a hasty luncheon at the buffet we pushed on at once to Scotland Yard.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context