7th Grade Spelling Words With Definition

Grade 7: With Definition - 5
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 Grade 7: With Definition - 5
incapablespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. unable to do something
a. not meeting requirements
He bent over Oliver, and repeated the inquiry; but finding him really incapable of understanding the question; and knowing that his not replying would only infuriate the magistrate the more, and add to the severity of his sentence; he hazarded a guess.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
Stupidly dozing, or communing with her incapable self about nothing, she sat for a little while with her hands at her ears, and her head resting on them.
Hard Times - Chapter 11
By Charles Dickens Context
The more I looked into the glowing coals, the more incapable I became of looking at Joe; the longer the silence lasted, the more unable I felt to speak.
Great Expectations - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
incompetencespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. lack of physical or intellectual ability to do something successfully
n. inability of a part or organ to function properly
If Lady Bertram, with all her incompetency and languor, could feel this, the inference of what her niece, alive and enlightened as she was, must feel, was elevating.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 34
By Jane Austen Context
I recalled the hopeless circumstances by which she had been surrounded in the miserable little shop and the miserable little noisy evening school, with that miserable old bundle of incompetence always to be dragged and shouldered.
Great Expectations - Chapter 17
By Charles Dickens Context
inconsideratespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. not thinking or worrying about other people or their feelings
The immediate advantage to herself was by no means inconsiderable, for it supplied her with endless jokes against them both.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 8
By Jane Austen Context
I have, I flatter myself, made no inconsiderable progress in her affections; but my own are entirely fixed.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 30
By Jane Austen Context
He had a decided propensity for bullying: derived no inconsiderable pleasure from the exercise of petty cruelty; and, consequently, was (it is needless to say) a coward.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 37
By Charles Dickens Context
independencespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. freedom from control or influence of others
There are some promotions in life, which, independent of the more substantial rewards they offer, require peculiar value and dignity from the coats and waistcoats connected with them.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 37
By Charles Dickens Context
Bounderby, whenever he could indulge it without the observation of that independent man, by making wry faces, or shutting one eye.
Hard Times - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
The only independent one among them, he warned her that she was doing too much for this man, and was placing herself too unreservedly in his power.
Great Expectations - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
indirectspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. not direct in manner, language, behavior, or action
a. avoiding clearly mentioning or saying something
He already showed that thought is a disease of flesh, and indirectly bore evidence that ideal physical beauty is incompatible with emotional development and a full recognition of the coil of things.
Return of the Native - Chapter 17
By Thomas Hardy Context
She found that he would give her anything she desired, answer any question she asked as long as she was forthright, and refuse her anything she attempted to gain by indirection, hints and feminine angling.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 50
By Margaret Mitche Context
individualspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. single person or thing; human regarded as a unique personality
She pointed to Hareton, the other individual, who had gained nothing but increased bulk and strength by the addition of two years to his age: he seemed as awkward and rough as ever.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 21
By Emily Bronte Context
Every individual was so involved in furze by his method of carrying the faggots that he appeared like a bush on legs till he had thrown them down.
Return of the Native - Chapter 3
By Thomas Hardy Context
You shall not, for the sake of one individual, change the meaning of principle and integrity, nor endeavour to persuade yourself or me, that selfishness is prudence, and insensibility of danger security for happiness.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 24
By Jane Austen Context
inequalityspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a lack of equality or fair treatment in the sharing of opportunities
There would have been the same inequality of lot, the same heaping up of favours here, of contumely there, the same generosity before justice, the same perpetual dilemmas, the same captious alteration of caresses and blows that we endure now.
Return of the Native - Chapter 7
By Thomas Hardy Context
There seems something more speakingly incomprehensible in the powers, the failures, the inequalities of memory, than in any other of our intelligences.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 22
By Jane Austen Context
inexpensivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. relatively low in price or charging low prices; not costing a lot of money
informalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. not formal or official; absence of ceremony
With a resigned air and a somewhat weary smile, Holmes begged the beautiful intruder to take a seat, and to inform us what it was that was troubling her.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Then, of course, she might give us very important information, but I was not sanguine that she would.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
For many years he had adopted a system of docketing all paragraphs concerning men and things, so that it was difficult to name a subject or a person on which he could not at once furnish information.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
informativespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. instructive and illustrative; providing or conveying information
With a resigned air and a somewhat weary smile, Holmes begged the beautiful intruder to take a seat, and to inform us what it was that was troubling her.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Then, of course, she might give us very important information, but I was not sanguine that she would.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
For many years he had adopted a system of docketing all paragraphs concerning men and things, so that it was difficult to name a subject or a person on which he could not at once furnish information.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
inhalespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. breathe or draw into the lungs
Three miles on he came to a spot where a soft perfume was wafted across his path, and he stood still for a moment to inhale the familiar scent.
Return of the Native - Chapter 34
By Thomas Hardy Context
Here, as I sat looking at the parcels, packages, and books, and inhaling the smell of stables (ever since associated with that morning), a procession of most tremendous considerations began to march through my mind.
David Copperfield - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
There was not much to take away, for he seemed only able to inhale it by thimblefuls, and his heart would soon wear itself out, the way it was beating.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Chapter 28
By Mark Twain Context
inheritspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. receive from an ancestor by legal succession or will; receive by bequest or as a legacy
If it were a girl, it was to inherit the money unconditionally; but if a boy, only on the stipulation that in his minority he should never have stained his name with any public act of dishonour, meanness, cowardice, or wrong.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 51
By Charles Dickens Context
He inherited a fair fortune from his uncle, but owed it all before he came into it, and spent it twice over immediately afterwards.
Hard Times - Chapter 5
By Charles Dickens Context
His ignorance, poor fellow, at last served him; he never mistrusted but that my inheritance was quite safe, with Mr.
Great Expectations - Chapter 55
By Charles Dickens Context
injuryspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. any physical damage to body caused by violence or accident
Bumble to understand that, from the violent and sanguinary onset of Oliver Twist, he had sustained severe internal injury and damage, from which he was at that moment suffering the acutest torture.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
But he had not spoken out of his own will and desire; and he felt it in his heart a noble return for his late injurious treatment to be faithful to the last to those who had repudiated him.
Hard Times - Chapter 18
By Charles Dickens Context
Bentley Drummle, who was so sulky a fellow that he even took up a book as if its writer had done him an injury, did not take up an acquaintance in a more agreeable spirit.
Great Expectations - Chapter 25
By Charles Dickens Context
instancespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. example that is cited to prove or illustrate a point
And he stared hard at the object of discourse, as one might do at a strange repulsive animal: a centipede from the Indies, for instance, which curiosity leads one to examine in spite of the aversion it raises.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 10
By Emily Bronte Context
There are instances of persons who, without clear ideas of the things they criticize have yet had clear ideas of the relations of those things.
Return of the Native - Chapter 22
By Thomas Hardy Context
Bennet on having so fine a family of daughters; said he had heard much of their beauty, but that in this instance fame had fallen short of the truth; and added, that he did not doubt her seeing them all in due time disposed of in marriage.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 13
By Jane Austen Context
insulationspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. act of covering something to stop heat, sound, or electricity from escaping or entering
n.state of being detached from other objects
insurancespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. protection against possible future loss by paying a company money
If Edgar Linton meets me, I shall not hesitate to knock him down, and give him enough to insure his quiescence while I stay.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 14
By Emily Bronte Context
MY gratitude will be insured immediately by any information tending to that end, and HERS must be gained by it in time.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 31
By Jane Austen Context
I had grand ideas of the wealth and importance of Insurers of Ships in the City, and I began to think with awe of having laid a young Insurer on his back, blackened his enterprising eye, and cut his responsible head open.
Great Expectations - Chapter 22
By Charles Dickens Context
interceptspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. take or seize by the way; cause to stop on the passage
I guessed, however, by his irregular and intercepted breathing, that he struggled to vanquish an excess of violent emotion.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 3
By Emily Bronte Context
The neighborhood, however, highly approved of these arrangements, and we were much admired as we went through the village; the more youthful and vigorous part of the community making dashes now and then to cut us off, and lying in wait to intercept us at points of vantage.
Great Expectations - Chapter 35
By Charles Dickens Context
He zealously undertook to do so, and to intercept any newspaper through which it might, without such precautions, reach him.
David Copperfield - Chapter 57
By Charles Dickens Context
interruptspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. terminate; make a break in
In such employments as these they were interrupted soon after breakfast the next day by the entrance of their landlord, who called to welcome them to Barton, and to offer them every accommodation from his own house and garden in which theirs might at present be deficient.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 6
By Jane Austen Context
To interrupt a silence which might make him fancy her affected with what had passed, she soon afterwards said:.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 33
By Jane Austen Context
The interruption had been short, though severe, and ease and animation returned to most of those they left as the door shut them out, but not to Anne.
Persuasion - Chapter 22
By Jane Austen Context
intriguespeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. captivate; cause to be interested or curious; interest someone a lot
At this time, as has been seen, Wildeve was quite innocent of any predetermined act of intrigue, and except at the dance on the green he had not once met Eustacia since her marriage.
Return of the Native - Chapter 31
By Thomas Hardy Context
You had not your little wits sharpened by their intriguing against you, suppressed and defenceless, under the mask of sympathy and pity and what not that is soft and soothing.
Great Expectations - Chapter 33
By Charles Dickens Context
This may be some trifling intrigue, and I cannot break my other important research for the sake of it.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 4
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
intuitivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. based on feelings rather than facts or proof; automatic, without requiring conscious thought
inventivespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. marked by independence and creativity in thought or action
The object of those who invented the system has apparently been to conceal that these characters convey a message, and to give the idea that they are the mere random sketches of children.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 3
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
Indeed, his mood was infectious, for I lay tossing half the night myself, brooding over this strange problem, and inventing a hundred theories, each of which was more impossible than the last.
The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 11
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
My father had a small factory at Coventry, which he enlarged at the time of the invention of bicycling.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 5
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
irrationalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. not using reason or clear thinking; illogical or insane
Catherine caught and perused it eagerly; then she put a few questions to me concerning the inmates, rational and irrational, of her former home; and gazing towards the hills, murmured in soliloquy:.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 31
By Emily Bronte Context
And your scheme is merely a castle in the air built on purpose to justify this folly which has seized you, and to salve your conscience on the irrational situation you are in.
Return of the Native - Chapter 22
By Thomas Hardy Context
All that sounded extravagant or irrational in the progress of the reconciliation might have no origin but in the language of the relators.
Persuasion - Chapter 15
By Jane Austen Context
irregularspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. not according to to rule, accepted order, or general practice
I guessed, however, by his irregular and intercepted breathing, that he struggled to vanquish an excess of violent emotion.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 3
By Emily Bronte Context
Beyond the irregular carpet of grass was a row of white palings, which marked the verge of the heath in this latitude.
Return of the Native - Chapter 12
By Thomas Hardy Context
I shall call hills steep, which ought to be bold; surfaces strange and uncouth, which ought to be irregular and rugged; and distant objects out of sight, which ought only to be indistinct through the soft medium of a hazy atmosphere.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 18
By Jane Austen Context
irrelevantspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. not related to what is being discussed or considered and therefore not important; not applicable; having no connection with
Sixteen at the most, thought Scarlett irrelevantly, must be one of the Home Guard or a runaway schoolboy.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 23
By Margaret Mitche Context
irreplaceablespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. impossible to replace because too special, unusual, or valuable
irresistiblespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. overwhelming; impossible to refuse or oppose because it is too pleasant and charming
He had a manner of screwing his head on one side when he spoke; and of looking out of the corners of his eyes at the same time: which irresistibly reminded the beholder of a parrot.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 14
By Charles Dickens Context
But when the phenomenon was enhanced by the notoriety and mystery by this time associated all over the town with the Bank robbery, it would have lured the stragglers in, with an irresistible attraction, though the roof had been expected to fall upon their heads.
Hard Times - Chapter 24
By Charles Dickens Context
The unqualified truth is, that when I loved Estella with the love of a man, I loved her simply because I found her irresistible.
Great Expectations - Chapter 29
By Charles Dickens Context
irresponsiblespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. showing lack of care for consequences; reckless; carefree
She was thinking with a leaden heart that in burying Gerald she was burying one of the last links that joined her to the old days of happiness and irresponsibility.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 40
By Margaret Mitche Context
jealousyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a feeling of unhappiness and anger because someone has something that you want; envy
He flung himself into the nearest seat, and on my approaching hurriedly to ascertain if she had fainted, he gnashed at me, and foamed like a mad dog, and gathered her to him with greedy jealousy.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 15
By Emily Bronte Context
Miss Bingley was then sorry that she had proposed the delay, for her jealousy and dislike of one sister much exceeded her affection for the other.
Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 12
By Jane Austen Context
Maria felt her triumph, and pursued her purpose, careless of Julia; and Julia could never see Maria distinguished by Henry Crawford without trusting that it would create jealousy, and bring a public disturbance at last.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 17
By Jane Austen Context
koalaspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. an Australian mammal with greyish fur
laterspeak speak spelling word quiz 
ad. at a time in the future or after the time you have mentioned
a. at or toward an end, late period or stage of development
Coming down somewhat later than usual, I saw, by the sunbeams piercing the chinks of the shutters, Miss Catherine still seated near the fireplace.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 9
By Emily Bronte Context
When he glanced at the letters a few minutes later he saw that the one lying at the top of the rest was an English letter and came from Yorkshire.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 27
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
The lower room was in darkness; but by feeling his way he found a table, whereon he placed the bottle, and a minute later emerged again upon the heath.
Return of the Native - Chapter 5
By Thomas Hardy Context
latterspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. near or towards the end of something
n. the second of two things previously mentioned
Bumble felt that it rather tended to convey a reflection on the honour of the parish; the latter gentleman thought it advisable to change the subject.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
He was startled when they came upon him while he was engaged in this latter pastime, and his colour changed.
Hard Times - Chapter 20
By Charles Dickens Context
The man was limping on towards this latter, as if he were the pirate come to life, and come down, and going back to hook himself up again.
Great Expectations - Chapter 1
By Charles Dickens Context
laughterspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. the act or sound of laughing
Having remained silent here, just long enough to recover breath to speak, Master Bates uttered an exclamation of amusement and delight; and, bursting into an uncontrollable fit of laughter, flung himself upon a doorstep, and rolled thereon in a transport of mirth.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 12
By Charles Dickens Context
Then she sat swaying her body to and fro, and making gestures with her unnerved arm, which seemed intended as the accompaniment to a fit of laughter, though her face was stolid and drowsy.
Hard Times - Chapter 8
By Charles Dickens Context
He received that piece of information with a yell of laughter, and dropped back, but came slouching after us at a little distance.
Great Expectations - Chapter 17
By Charles Dickens Context
leadershipspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. position or office of a leader; guidance, direction, or authority
Whatever happened she would remain faithful, work hard, carry out the orders that were given to her, and accept the leadership of Napoleon.
Animal Farm - Chapter 7
By George Orwell Context
leaguespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a group of members who join together because they have the same interest; association or union
Yeobright were in league, and felt that there was a certain legitimacy in combating such a coalition.
Return of the Native - Chapter 31
By Thomas Hardy Context
I could rather believe every creature of my acquaintance leagued together to ruin me in his opinion, than believe his nature capable of such cruelty.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 29
By Jane Austen Context
But they saw now that the Commandment had not been violated; for clearly there was good reason for killing the traitors who had leagued themselves with Snowball.
Animal Farm - Chapter 8
By George Orwell Context
leisurespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. the time when someone are free from work or other duties and can relax
She jumped up in a fine fright, flung Hareton on to the settle, and ran to seek for her friend herself; not taking leisure to consider why she was so flurried, or how her talk would have affected him.
Wuthering Heights - Chapter 9
By Emily Bronte Context
The play proceeded between Saint George, the Saracen, the Doctor, and Father Christmas; and Eustacia, having no more to do, for the first time found leisure to observe the scene round, and to search for the form that had drawn her hither.
Return of the Native - Chapter 16
By Thomas Hardy Context
John Dashwood had then leisure to consider how much there might prudently be in his power to do for them.
Sense and Sensibility - Chapter 1
By Jane Austen Context
lemonadespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a drink made with the juice of lemons, water, and sugar
Scarlett clapped her hands dutifully with the rest and, as the soldiers pushed forward toward the punch and lemonade booths after they were dismissed, she turned to Melanie, feeling that she had better begin her deception about the Cause as soon as possible.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 9
By Margaret Mitche Context
licensespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. official or legal permission to do or own a specified thing
It was impossible but that Mrs Clay must hate the sight of Mr Elliot; and yet she could assume a most obliging, placid look, and appear quite satisfied with the curtailed license of devoting herself only half as much to Sir Walter as she would have done otherwise.
Persuasion - Chapter 22
By Jane Austen Context
They ruled that no one could get a letter our of the post office without taking the Iron Clad oath and, in some instances, they even prohibited the issuance of marriage licenses unless the couples had taken the hated oath.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 37
By Margaret Mitche Context
It seems that there had been some informality about their license, that the clergyman absolutely refused to marry them without a witness of some sort, and that my lucky appearance saved the bridegroom from having to sally out into the streets in search of a best man.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
macaronispeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. pasta in the form of slender tubes
magazinespeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a type of thin book that contains articles and photographs and is published every week or month
The Yankee blockade about the Confederate ports had tightened, and luxuries such as tea, coffee, silks, whalebone stays, colognes, fashion magazines and books were scarce and dear.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 12
By Margaret Mitche Context
I wrote a little something, in secret, and sent it to a magazine, and it was published in the magazine.
David Copperfield - Chapter 43
By Charles Dickens Context
Then I picked up a magazine from the table and attempted to while away the time with it, while my companion munched silently at his toast.
A Study In Scarlet - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
magicspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. any art that invokes supernatural powers
Then he stood looking at the handle of the spade as if there might be Magic in it, and then he began to dig again and said nothing for several minutes.
The Secret Garden - Chapter 10
By Frances Hodgson Burnett Context
It was as though when writing Melanie, Ashley tried to ignore the war altogether, and sought to draw about the two of them a magic circle of timelessness, shutting out everything that had happened since Fort Sumter was the news of the day.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 11
By Margaret Mitche Context
The melancholy which had seemed to the sad eyes of the anxious boy to hang, for days past, over every object, beautiful as all were, was dispelled by magic.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 34
By Charles Dickens Context
magnifyspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. intensify or increase; make greater in size
Always creeping along the ground to some small end or other, he will always magnify every object in the way; and consequently will hate and suspect everybody that comes, in the most innocent manner, between him and it.
David Copperfield - Chapter 54
By Charles Dickens Context
Merryweather perched himself upon a crate, with a very injured expression upon his face, while Holmes fell upon his knees upon the floor and, with the lantern and a magnifying lens, began to examine minutely the cracks between the stones.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 2
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
majorityspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. greater number or part; a number more than half of the total
Scarlett knew Rhett had no exalted opinion of Ashley and cared nothing at all about the fact that he had been made a major.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 12
By Margaret Mitche Context
On the contrary, a large majority of the boys (especially the smaller ones) were visited with similar instances of notice, as Mr.
David Copperfield - Chapter 7
By Charles Dickens Context
It had come to be accepted that the pigs, who were manifestly cleverer than the other animals, should decide all questions of farm policy, though their decisions had to be ratified by a majority vote.
Animal Farm - Chapter 5
By George Orwell Context
maliciousspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. deliberately harmful; proceeding from extreme hatred
The South had been tilted as by a giant malicious hand, and those who had once ruled were now more helpless than their former slaves had ever been.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 37
By Margaret Mitche Context
Every member of the respectable coterie appeared plunged in his own reflections; not excepting the dog, who by a certain malicious licking of his lips seemed to be meditating an attack upon the legs of the first gentleman or lady he might encounter in the streets when he went out.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 13
By Charles Dickens Context
Sending her out to attract and torment and do mischief, Miss Havisham sent her with the malicious assurance that she was beyond the reach of all admirers, and that all who staked upon that cast were secured to lose.
Great Expectations - Chapter 38
By Charles Dickens Context
marshalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. put in order; arrange or place something in line
But she could marshal no words because she was trying to find in his face some answering emotions, some leaping light of hope, of joy.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 63
By Margaret Mitche Context
Markleham; but our boys used to call her the Old Soldier, on account of her generalship, and the skill with which she marshalled great forces of relations against the Doctor.
David Copperfield - Chapter 16
By Charles Dickens Context
He set his ears back, shook his forelock several times, and tried hard to marshal his thoughts; but in the end he could not think of anything to say.
Animal Farm - Chapter 5
By George Orwell Context
martialspeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. relating to, or suggestive of war; connected with the armed forces
The North was determined to force the negro vote on the state and, to this end, Georgia had been declared in rebellion and put under the strictest martial law.
Gone With The Wind - Chapter 44
By Margaret Mitche Context
Marylandspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a Mid-Atlantic state, one of the original 13 colonies
medalspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. a piece of metal in form of coin, given as a reward for a brave action, for winning a competition, or to remember a special event
mediocrespeak speak spelling word quiz 
a. not very good; moderate to inferior in quality; ordinary or commonplace
She could not admit at once that she might have overestimated Wildeve, for to perceive his mediocrity now was to admit her own great folly heretofore.
Return of the Native - Chapter 11
By Thomas Hardy Context
You will take in the whole of the past, you will consider times, persons, and probabilities, and you will feel that they were not least your friends who were educating and preparing you for that mediocrity of condition which seemed to be your lot.
Mansfield Park - Chapter 32
By Jane Austen Context
membershipspeak speak spelling word quiz 
n. the body of members of an organization or group
n. the state of being a member
Very likely he had spoken to him privately, and had threatened to expose him unless he voluntarily resigned his membership of the club, and promised not to play cards again.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Chapter 1
By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
mentionspeak speak spelling word quiz 
v. speak or notice of anything, usually in a brief or cursory manner
Oliver, whose eyes had glistened at the mention of meat, and who was trembling with eagerness to devour it, replied in the negative; and a plateful of coarse broken victuals was set before him.
Oliver Twist - Chapter 4
By Charles Dickens Context
Indeed, as he eagerly sparkled at them from the cellarage before mentioned, he seemed a kind of cannon loaded to the muzzle with facts, and prepared to blow them clean out of the regions of childhood at one discharge.
Hard Times - Chapter 2
By Charles Dickens Context
I insensibly fall into a general mention of these journeys as numerous, because it was at once settled that I should return every alternate day at noon for these purposes, and because I am now going to sum up a period of at least eight or ten months.
Great Expectations - Chapter 12
By Charles Dickens Context