BENTLEY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Bentley in Great Expectations
1  I asked him if he had ever seen Miss Havisham's adopted daughter, Mrs. Bentley Drummle.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
2  It is impossible to turn this leaf of my life, without putting Bentley Drummle's name upon it; or I would, very gladly.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
3  My greatest reassurance was that he was coming to Barnard's Inn, not to Hammersmith, and consequently would not fall in Bentley Drummle's way.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVII
4  Thus, Bentley Drummle had come to Mr. Pocket when he was a head taller than that gentleman, and half a dozen heads thicker than most gentlemen.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
5  Bentley Drummle, who was so sulky a fellow that he even took up a book as if its writer had done him an injury, did not take up an acquaintance in a more agreeable spirit.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
6  It came to my knowledge, through what passed between Mrs. Pocket and Drummle while I was attentive to my knife and fork, spoon, glasses, and other instruments of self-destruction, that Drummle, whose Christian name was Bentley, was actually the next heir but one to a baronetcy.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
7  It was but natural that I should take to him much more kindly than to Drummle, and that, even in the earliest evenings of our boating, he and I should pull homeward abreast of one another, conversing from boat to boat, while Bentley Drummle came up in our wake alone, under the overhanging banks and among the rushes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV