JOE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Joe in Great Expectations
1  Mrs. Joe has been out a dozen times, looking for you, Pip.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
2  And it was made the more difficult by the unconscious Joe.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
3  She sot down," said Joe, "and she got up, and she made a grab at Tickler, and she Ram-paged out.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
4  When I ran home from the churchyard, the forge was shut up, and Joe was sitting alone in the kitchen.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
5  She made it a powerful merit in herself, and a strong reproach against Joe, that she wore this apron so much.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
6  Well," said Joe, glancing up at the Dutch clock, "she's been on the Ram-page, this last spell, about five minutes, Pip.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
7  She was not a good-looking woman, my sister; and I had a general impression that she must have made Joe Gargery marry her by hand.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
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8  I knew Mrs. Joe's housekeeping to be of the strictest kind, and that my larcenous researches might find nothing available in the safe.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
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9  After that, he sat feeling his right-side flaxen curls and whisker, and following Mrs. Joe about with his blue eyes, as his manner always was at squally times.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
10  My sister, Mrs. Joe, throwing the door wide open, and finding an obstruction behind it, immediately divined the cause, and applied Tickler to its further investigation.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
11  Joe was a fair man, with curls of flaxen hair on each side of his smooth face, and with eyes of such a very undecided blue that they seemed to have somehow got mixed with their own whites.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
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12  My sister, Mrs. Joe, with black hair and eyes, had such a prevailing redness of skin that I sometimes used to wonder whether it was possible she washed herself with a nutmeg-grater instead of soap.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
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13  Joe and I being fellow-sufferers, and having confidences as such, Joe imparted a confidence to me, the moment I raised the latch of the door and peeped in at him opposite to it, sitting in the chimney corner.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
14  Then, she gave the knife a final smart wipe on the edge of the plaster, and then sawed a very thick round off the loaf: which she finally, before separating from the loaf, hewed into two halves, of which Joe got one, and I the other.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
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15  As she applied herself to set the tea-things, Joe peeped down at me over his leg, as if he were mentally casting me and himself up, and calculating what kind of pair we practically should make, under the grievous circumstances foreshadowed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
16  To-night, Joe several times invited me, by the display of his fast diminishing slice, to enter upon our usual friendly competition; but he found me, each time, with my yellow mug of tea on one knee, and my untouched bread and butter on the other.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
17  Having at that time to find out for myself what the expression meant, and knowing her to have a hard and heavy hand, and to be much in the habit of laying it upon her husband as well as upon me, I supposed that Joe Gargery and I were both brought up by hand.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
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