SATIS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - Satis in Great Expectations
1  The time has come round when Miss Havisham wishes to have me for a day at Satis.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
2  Early in the morning, while my breakfast was getting ready, I strolled round by Satis House.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVIII
3  It was the first time I had ever lain down to rest in Satis House, and sleep refused to come near me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
4  While it was preparing, I went to Satis House and inquired for Miss Havisham; she was still very ill, though considered something better.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LII
5  We went down on the next day but one, and we found her in the room where I had first beheld her, and it is needless to add that there was no change in Satis House.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
6  Putting Miss Havisham's note in my pocket, that it might serve as my credentials for so soon reappearing at Satis House, in case her waywardness should lead her to express any surprise at seeing me, I went down again by the coach next day.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIX
7  Miss Havisham's intentions towards me, all a mere dream; Estella not designed for me; I only suffered in Satis House as a convenience, a sting for the greedy relations, a model with a mechanical heart to practise on when no other practice was at hand; those were the first smarts I had.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX