JAGGERS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Jaggers in Great Expectations
1  Mr. Jaggers left word, would you wait in his room.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
2  My name," he said, "is Jaggers, and I am a lawyer in London.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
3  "Lord forbidding is pious, but not to the purpose," returned Mr. Jaggers.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
4  Mr. Jaggers had risen when Joe demonstrated, and had backed near the door.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
5  "Now, I have nothing to say to you," said Mr. Jaggers, throwing his finger at them.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
6  I thought Mr. Jaggers glanced at Joe, as if he considered him a fool for his disinterestedness.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
7  I wish to be quite right, Mr. Jaggers, and to keep to your directions; so I thought I had better ask.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
8  Mr. Jaggers had looked on at this, as one who recognized in Joe the village idiot, and in me his keeper.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
9  First," said Mr. Jaggers, "you should have some new clothes to come in, and they should not be working-clothes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
10  "There is a certain tutor, of whom I have some knowledge, who I think might suit the purpose," said Mr. Jaggers.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
11  I dropped into the office to ask if Mr. Jaggers had come in yet, and I found he had not, and I strolled out again.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
12  I sat down in the cliental chair placed over against Mr. Jaggers's chair, and became fascinated by the dismal atmosphere of the place.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
13  I am instructed to communicate to him," said Mr. Jaggers, throwing his finger at me sideways, "that he will come into a handsome property.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
14  Mr. Jaggers, putting a hand on my shoulder and walking me on at his side without saying anything to me, addressed himself to his followers.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
15  At length, as I was looking out at the iron gate of Bartholomew Close into Little Britain, I saw Mr. Jaggers coming across the road towards me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
16  But I sat wondering and waiting in Mr. Jaggers's close room, until I really could not bear the two casts on the shelf above Mr. Jaggers's chair, and got up and went out.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
17  The room was but small, and the clients seemed to have had a habit of backing up against the wall; the wall, especially opposite to Mr. Jaggers's chair, being greasy with shoulders.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
18  Mr. Jaggers's own high-backed chair was of deadly black horsehair, with rows of brass nails round it, like a coffin; and I fancied I could see how he leaned back in it, and bit his forefinger at the clients.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
19  Mr. Jaggers's room was lighted by a skylight only, and was a most dismal place; the skylight, eccentrically pitched like a broken head, and the distorted adjoining houses looking as if they had twisted themselves to peep down at me through it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
20  I wondered whether the two swollen faces were of Mr. Jaggers's family, and, if he were so unfortunate as to have had a pair of such ill-looking relations, why he stuck them on that dusty perch for the blacks and flies to settle on, instead of giving them a place at home.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX