LONDON in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - London in Great Expectations
1  You may get cheated, robbed, and murdered in London.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXI
2  I am sure I shall be very happy to show London to you.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXI
3  My name," he said, "is Jaggers, and I am a lawyer in London.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
4  The way shall be prepared for you, and you can see his son first, who is in London.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
5  I was rather confused, thinking it must be out of the London fashion, but said yes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXI
6  You can take a hackney-coach at the stage-coach office in London, and come straight to me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
7  I had scant luggage to take with me to London, for little of the little I possessed was adapted to my new station.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
8  My father thought you would get on more agreeably through to-morrow with me than with him, and might like to take a walk about London.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXI
9  I am going up to my guardian in London," said I, casually drawing some guineas out of my pocket and looking at them; "and I want a fashionable suit of clothes to go in.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
10  I write this by request of Mr. Gargery, for to let you know that he is going to London in company with Mr. Wopsle and would be glad if agreeable to be allowed to see you.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVII
11  Of course I had no experience of a London summer day, and my spirits may have been oppressed by the hot exhausted air, and by the dust and grit that lay thick on everything.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
12  It was a little past midday when the four-horse stage-coach by which I was a passenger, got into the ravel of traffic frayed out about the Cross Keys, Wood Street, Cheapside, London.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
13  I presented him with a half-share in my boat, which was the occasion of his often coming down to Hammersmith; and my possession of a half-share in his chambers often took me up to London.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
14  He advised my attending certain places in London, for the acquisition of such mere rudiments as I wanted, and my investing him with the functions of explainer and director of all my studies.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIV
15  After this escape, I was content to take a foggy view of the Inn through the window's encrusting dirt, and to stand dolefully looking out, saying to myself that London was decidedly overrated.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXI
16  After two or three days, when I had established myself in my room and had gone backwards and forwards to London several times, and had ordered all I wanted of my tradesmen, Mr. Pocket and I had a long talk together.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIV
17  We Britons had at that time particularly settled that it was treasonable to doubt our having and our being the best of everything: otherwise, while I was scared by the immensity of London, I think I might have had some faint doubts whether it was not rather ugly, crooked, narrow, and dirty.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
18  What lay heaviest on my mind was, the consideration that six days intervened between me and the day of departure; for I could not divest myself of a misgiving that something might happen to London in the meanwhile, and that, when I got there, it would be either greatly deteriorated or clean gone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
19  When he had at last done and had appointed to send the articles to Mr. Pumblechook's on the Thursday evening, he said, with his hand upon the parlor lock, "I know, sir, that London gentlemen cannot be expected to patronize local work, as a rule; but if you would give me a turn now and then in the quality of a townsman, I should greatly esteem it."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
20  Yet in the London streets so crowded with people and so brilliantly lighted in the dusk of evening, there were depressing hints of reproaches for that I had put the poor old kitchen at home so far away; and in the dead of night, the footsteps of some incapable impostor of a porter mooning about Barnard's Inn, under pretence of watching it, fell hollow on my heart.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII