PUMBLECHOOK in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - Pumblechook in Great Expectations
1  Mr. Pumblechook partook of pudding.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
2  "True again," said Uncle Pumblechook.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
3  I saw Mr. Pumblechook balance his knife.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
4  "She ain't in that line, Mum," said Mr. Pumblechook.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
5  But Mr. Pumblechook said, sharply, "Give him wine, Mum."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
6  "Well, but I mean a four-footed Squeaker," said Mr. Pumblechook.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
7  Mr. Pumblechook added, after a short interval of reflection, "Look at Pork alone."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
8  Besides," said Mr. Pumblechook, turning sharp on me, "think what you've got to be grateful for.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
9  The course terminated, and Mr. Pumblechook had begun to beam under the genial influence of gin and water.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
10  Mr. Pumblechook and Mr. Hubble declined, on the plea of a pipe and ladies' society; but Mr. Wopsle said he would go, if Joe would.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
11  But, Uncle Pumblechook, who was omnipotent in that kitchen, wouldn't hear the word, wouldn't hear of the subject, imperiously waved it all away with his hand, and asked for hot gin and water.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
12  I noticed that Mr. Pumblechook in his hospitality appeared to forget that he had made a present of the wine, but took the bottle from Mrs. Joe and had all the credit of handing it about in a gush of joviality.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
13  Mrs. Joe was soon landed, and Uncle Pumblechook was soon down too, covering the mare with a cloth, and we were soon all in the kitchen, carrying so much cold air in with us that it seemed to drive all the heat out of the fire.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
14  The sergeant took a polite leave of the ladies, and parted from Mr. Pumblechook as from a comrade; though I doubt if he were quite as fully sensible of that gentleman's merits under arid conditions, as when something moist was going.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
15  But I don't mean in that form, sir," returned Mr. Pumblechook, who had an objection to being interrupted; "I mean, enjoying himself with his elders and betters, and improving himself with their conversation, and rolling in the lap of luxury.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
16  Mrs. Joe made occasional trips with Uncle Pumblechook on market-days, to assist him in buying such household stuffs and goods as required a woman's judgment; Uncle Pumblechook being a bachelor and reposing no confidences in his domestic servant.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
17  For you do not know that Uncle Pumblechook, being sensible that for anything we can tell, this boy's fortune may be made by his going to Miss Havisham's, has offered to take him into town to-night in his own chaise-cart, and to keep him to-night, and to take him with his own hands to Miss Havisham's to-morrow morning.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.