BREAKFAST in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
 Search Panel
Word:
 You may input your word too.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
Sort by:
 Current Search - Breakfast in Sense and Sensibility
1  While they were at breakfast the letters were brought in.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
2  Yes; and the set of breakfast china is twice as handsome as what belongs to this house.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
3  By ten o'clock the whole party was assembled at the park, where they were to breakfast.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
4  "It is charming weather for THEM indeed," she continued, as she sat down to the breakfast table with a happy countenance.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
5  I think, Edward," said Mrs. Dashwood, as they were at breakfast the last morning, "you would be a happier man if you had any profession to engage your time and give an interest to your plans and actions.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
6  When breakfast was over she walked out by herself, and wandered about the village of Allenham, indulging the recollection of past enjoyment and crying over the present reverse for the chief of the morning.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
7  If this open weather holds much longer," said Mrs. Jennings, when they met at breakfast the following morning, "Sir John will not like leaving Barton next week; 'tis a sad thing for sportsmen to lose a day's pleasure.'
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
8  At breakfast she neither ate, nor attempted to eat any thing; and Elinor's attention was then all employed, not in urging her, not in pitying her, nor in appearing to regard her, but in endeavouring to engage Mrs. Jennings's notice entirely to herself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
9  Edward was allowed to retain the privilege of first comer, and Colonel Brandon therefore walked every night to his old quarters at the Park; from whence he usually returned in the morning, early enough to interrupt the lovers' first tete-a-tete before breakfast.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
10  In such employments as these they were interrupted soon after breakfast the next day by the entrance of their landlord, who called to welcome them to Barton, and to offer them every accommodation from his own house and garden in which theirs might at present be deficient.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
11  They had not long finished their breakfast before Mrs. Palmer's barouche stopped at the door, and in a few minutes she came laughing into the room: so delighted to see them all, that it was hard to say whether she received most pleasure from meeting her mother or the Miss Dashwoods again.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
12  Elinor encouraged her as much as possible to talk of what she felt; and before breakfast was ready, they had gone through the subject again and again; and with the same steady conviction and affectionate counsel on Elinor's side, the same impetuous feelings and varying opinions on Marianne's, as before.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
13  Thus a circumstance occurred, while the sisters were together in their own room after breakfast, which sunk the heart of Mrs. Jennings still lower in her estimation; because, through her own weakness, it chanced to prove a source of fresh pain to herself, though Mrs. Jennings was governed in it by an impulse of the utmost goodwill.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
14  In such circumstances, it was better for both that they should not be long together; and the restless state of Marianne's mind not only prevented her from remaining in the room a moment after she was dressed, but requiring at once solitude and continual change of place, made her wander about the house till breakfast time, avoiding the sight of every body.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29