CARRIAGE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Carriage in Sense and Sensibility
1  They saw him step into his carriage, and in a minute it was out of sight.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
2  The carriages were then ordered; Willoughby's was first, and Marianne never looked happier than when she got into it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
3  She could scarcely eat any dinner, and when they afterwards returned to the drawing room, seemed anxiously listening to the sound of every carriage.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
4  Mr. Willoughby however is the only person who can have a right to shew that house; and as he went in an open carriage, it was impossible to have any other companion.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
5  It was quite a sudden thing our coming at all, and I knew nothing of it till the carriage was coming to the door, and then Mr. Palmer asked me if I would go with him to Barton.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
6  They reached town by three o'clock the third day, glad to be released, after such a journey, from the confinement of a carriage, and ready to enjoy all the luxury of a good fire.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
7  Mr. Dashwood attended them down stairs, was introduced to Mrs. Jennings at the door of her carriage, and repeating his hope of being able to call on them the next day, took leave.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
8  She could soon tell at what coachmaker's the new carriage was building, by what painter Mr. Willoughby's portrait was drawn, and at what warehouse Miss Grey's clothes might be seen.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
9  Two ladies were waiting for their carriage, and one of them was giving the other an account of the intended match, in a voice so little attempting concealment, that it was impossible for me not to hear all.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
10  The carriage was at the door ready to take my poor cousins away, and they were just stepping in as he came off; poor Lucy in such a condition, he says, she could hardly walk; and Nancy, she was almost as bad.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
11  Lady Middleton, though in the middle of a rubber, on being informed that Marianne was unwell, was too polite to object for a moment to her wish of going away, and making over her cards to a friend, they departed as soon the carriage could be found.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
12  They contained a noble piece of water; a sail on which was to a form a great part of the morning's amusement; cold provisions were to be taken, open carriages only to be employed, and every thing conducted in the usual style of a complete party of pleasure.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
13  He had met Mrs. Jennings at the door in her way to the carriage, as he came to leave his farewell card; and she, after apologising for not returning herself, had obliged him to enter, by saying that Miss Dashwood was above, and wanted to speak with him on very particular business.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 40
14  They arrived in due time at the place of destination, and as soon as the string of carriages before them would allow, alighted, ascended the stairs, heard their names announced from one landing-place to another in an audible voice, and entered a room splendidly lit up, quite full of company, and insufferably hot.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
15  As soon as they returned to the carriage, Mrs. Jennings was eager for information; but as Elinor wished to spread as little as possible intelligence that had in the first place been so unfairly obtained, she confined herself to the brief repetition of such simple particulars, as she felt assured that Lucy, for the sake of her own consequence, would choose to have known.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
16  With such encouragement as this, was she dismissed on the present occasion, to her brother's carriage; which they were ready to enter five minutes after it stopped at the door, a punctuality not very agreeable to their sister-in-law, who had preceded them to the house of her acquaintance, and was there hoping for some delay on their part that might inconvenience either herself or her coachman.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
17  Their visitors, except those from Barton Park, were not many; for, in spite of Sir John's urgent entreaties that they would mix more in the neighbourhood, and repeated assurances of his carriage being always at their service, the independence of Mrs. Dashwood's spirit overcame the wish of society for her children; and she was resolute in declining to visit any family beyond the distance of a walk.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
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