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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Draw in Sense and Sensibility
1  The remaining five were now to draw their cards.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
2  The time was now drawing on, when Colonel Brandon might be expected back.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43
3  Mrs. Palmer's eye was now caught by the drawings which hung round the room.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
4  And drawing him a little aside, she whispered her persuasion that Lucy could not stay much longer.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
5  It is evident, in spite of his frequent attention to her while she draws, that in fact he knows nothing of the matter.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
6  Marianne's pianoforte was unpacked and properly disposed of; and Elinor's drawings were affixed to the walls of their sitting room.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
7  She could scarcely eat any dinner, and when they afterwards returned to the drawing room, seemed anxiously listening to the sound of every carriage.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
8  Music seems scarcely to attract him, and though he admires Elinor's drawings very much, it is not the admiration of a person who can understand their worth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
9  The third day succeeding their knowledge of the particulars, was so fine, so beautiful a Sunday as to draw many to Kensington Gardens, though it was only the second week in March.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
10  Let me be able to fancy that a better knowledge of my heart, and of my present feelings, will draw from her a more spontaneous, more natural, more gentle, less dignified, forgiveness.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 44
11  Marianne was afraid of offending, and said no more on the subject; but the kind of approbation which Elinor described as excited in him by the drawings of other people, was very far from that rapturous delight, which, in her opinion, could alone be called taste.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
12  The weather was not tempting enough to draw the two others from their pencil and their book, in spite of Marianne's declaration that the day would be lastingly fair, and that every threatening cloud would be drawn off from their hills; and the two girls set off together.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
13  Mrs. Dashwood and her daughters were met at the door of the house by Sir John, who welcomed them to Barton Park with unaffected sincerity; and as he attended them to the drawing room repeated to the young ladies the concern which the same subject had drawn from him the day before, at being unable to get any smart young men to meet them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
14  Before her removing from Norland, Elinor had painted a very pretty pair of screens for her sister-in-law, which being now just mounted and brought home, ornamented her present drawing room; and these screens, catching the eye of John Dashwood on his following the other gentlemen into the room, were officiously handed by him to Colonel Brandon for his admiration.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
15  The insipidity of the meeting was exactly such as Elinor had expected; it produced not one novelty of thought or expression, and nothing could be less interesting than the whole of their discourse both in the dining parlour and drawing room: to the latter, the children accompanied them, and while they remained there, she was too well convinced of the impossibility of engaging Lucy's attention to attempt it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23