EMOTION in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Emotion in Sense and Sensibility
1  Now, I can think and speak of it with little emotion.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
2  "I think I have," replied Elinor, with an exertion of spirits, which increased with her increase of emotion.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
3  As it was, it required but a slight effort of fancy to connect his emotion with the tender recollection of past regard.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
4  He turned round on their coming in, and his countenance shewed that he strongly partook of the emotion which over-powered Marianne.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
5  "I did," said Elinor, with a composure of voice, under which was concealed an emotion and distress beyond any thing she had ever felt before.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
6  Her narration was clear and simple; and though it could not be given without emotion, it was not accompanied by violent agitation, nor impetuous grief.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
7  The letters from town, which a few days before would have made every nerve in Elinor's body thrill with transport, now arrived to be read with less emotion than mirth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
8  You are very wrong, Mr. Willoughby, very blamable," said Elinor, while her voice, in spite of herself, betrayed her compassionate emotion; "you ought not to speak in this way, either of Mrs. Willoughby or my sister.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 44
9  But here, Elinor could neither wonder nor blame; and when she saw, as she assisted Marianne from the carriage, that she had been crying, she saw only an emotion too natural in itself to raise any thing less tender than pity, and in its unobtrusiveness entitled to praise.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46