IGNORANT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Ignorant in Great Expectations
1  This is an ignorant, determined man, who has long had one fixed idea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLI
2  But she did not; on the contrary, she seemed to prefer my being ignorant.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
3  I am ignorant what may become of me very soon, how poor I may be, or where I may go.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
4  I imparted to Mr. Jaggers my design of keeping him in ignorance of the fate of his wealth.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LV
5  I wanted to make Joe less ignorant and common, that he might be worthier of my society and less open to Estella's reproach.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
6  His ignorance, poor fellow, at last served him; he never mistrusted but that my inheritance was quite safe, with Mr. Jaggers's aid.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LV
7  There was a long hard time when I kept far from me the remembrance of what I had thrown away when I was quite ignorant of its worth.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIX
8  He knows your character, Joseph, and is well acquainted with your pig-headedness and ignorance; and he knows my character, Joseph, and he knows my want of gratitoode.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVIII
9  I alluded to the advantages I had derived in my first rawness and ignorance from his society, and I confessed that I feared I had but ill repaid them, and that he might have done better without me and my expectations.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
10  But that he was not to be, without ignorance or prejudice, mistaken for a gentleman, my father most strongly asseverates; because it is a principle of his that no man who was not a true gentleman at heart ever was, since the world began, a true gentleman in manner.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII