JENNINGS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Jennings in Sense and Sensibility
1  Mrs. Jennings was a widow with an ample jointure.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
2  "I can guess what his business is, however," said Mrs. Jennings exultingly.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
3  "No bad news, Colonel, I hope;" said Mrs. Jennings, as soon as he entered the room.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
4  If the impertinent remarks of Mrs. Jennings are to be the proof of impropriety in conduct, we are all offending every moment of our lives.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
5  She was convinced that Margaret had fixed on a person whose name she could not bear with composure to become a standing joke with Mrs. Jennings.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
6  Mrs. Jennings, Lady Middleton's mother, was a good-humoured, merry, fat, elderly woman, who talked a great deal, seemed very happy, and rather vulgar.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
7  As soon as they left the dining-room, Elinor enquired of her about it; and great was her surprise when she found that every circumstance related by Mrs. Jennings was perfectly true.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
8  Colonel Brandon, the friend of Sir John, seemed no more adapted by resemblance of manner to be his friend, than Lady Middleton was to be his wife, or Mrs. Jennings to be Lady Middleton's mother.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
9  Colonel Brandon is certainly younger than Mrs. Jennings, but he is old enough to be MY father; and if he were ever animated enough to be in love, must have long outlived every sensation of the kind.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
10  Mrs. Jennings had been anxious to see Colonel Brandon well married, ever since her connection with Sir John first brought him to her knowledge; and she was always anxious to get a good husband for every pretty girl.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
11  Mrs. Jennings sat on Elinor's right hand; and they had not been long seated, before she leant behind her and Willoughby, and said to Marianne, loud enough for them both to hear, "I have found you out in spite of all your tricks."
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
12  Marianne was vexed at it for her sister's sake, and turned her eyes towards Elinor to see how she bore these attacks, with an earnestness which gave Elinor far more pain than could arise from such common-place raillery as Mrs. Jennings's.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
13  Neither Lady Middleton nor Mrs. Jennings could supply to her the conversation she missed; although the latter was an everlasting talker, and from the first had regarded her with a kindness which ensured her a large share of her discourse.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
14  Mrs. Dashwood, who could not think a man five years younger than herself, so exceedingly ancient as he appeared to the youthful fancy of her daughter, ventured to clear Mrs. Jennings from the probability of wishing to throw ridicule on his age.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
15  She had already repeated her own history to Elinor three or four times; and had Elinor's memory been equal to her means of improvement, she might have known very early in their acquaintance all the particulars of Mr. Jennings's last illness, and what he said to his wife a few minutes before he died.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
16  Mrs. Jennings laughed heartily; and Elinor found that in her resolution to know where they had been, she had actually made her own woman enquire of Mr. Willoughby's groom; and that she had by that method been informed that they had gone to Allenham, and spent a considerable time there in walking about the garden and going all over the house.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
17  Elinor was obliged, though unwillingly, to believe that the sentiments which Mrs. Jennings had assigned him for her own satisfaction, were now actually excited by her sister; and that however a general resemblance of disposition between the parties might forward the affection of Mr. Willoughby, an equally striking opposition of character was no hindrance to the regard of Colonel Brandon.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
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