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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Judge in Great Expectations
1  You shall have some eggs, and judge for yourself.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LV
2  "I judged the person to be with him," returned the watchman.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XL
3  'To judge from appearances, you're out of luck, says Compeyson to me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLII
4  There was some hushing, and the Judge went on with what he had to say to the rest.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVI
5  The black-hole of that ship warn't a strong one, to a judge of black-holes that could swim and dive.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLII
6  But nothing could unsay the fact that he had returned, and was there in presence of the Judge and Jury.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVI
7  She might have been some two or three years younger than Wemmick, and I judged her to stand possessed of portable property.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
8  I judged him to be about my own age, but he was much taller, and he had a way of spinning himself about that was full of appearance.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
9  I had not got far into it, when I judged from her looks that she was thinking in a discursive way of me, rather than of what I said.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIX
10  It appeared to me that the eggs from which young Insurers were hatched were incubated in dust and heat, like the eggs of ostriches, judging from the places to which those incipient giants repaired on a Monday morning.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
11  But for the indelible picture that my remembrance now holds before me, I could scarcely believe, even as I write these words, that I saw two-and-thirty men and women put before the Judge to receive that sentence together.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVI
12  I judged him to be a bachelor from the frayed condition of his linen, and he appeared to have sustained a good many bereavements; for he wore at least four mourning rings, besides a brooch representing a lady and a weeping willow at a tomb with an urn on it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXI
13  They were all displayed in that chamber of the Castle into which I had been first inducted, and which served, not only as the general sitting-room but as the kitchen too, if I might judge from a saucepan on the hob, and a brazen bijou over the fireplace designed for the suspension of a roasting-jack.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
14  The noble boy in the ancestral boots was inconsistent, representing himself, as it were in one breath, as an able seaman, a strolling actor, a grave-digger, a clergyman, and a person of the utmost importance at a Court fencing-match, on the authority of whose practised eye and nice discrimination the finest strokes were judged.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXI
15  The sun was striking in at the great windows of the court, through the glittering drops of rain upon the glass, and it made a broad shaft of light between the two-and-thirty and the Judge, linking both together, and perhaps reminding some among the audience how both were passing on, with absolute equality, to the greater Judgment that knoweth all things, and cannot err.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVI