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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Living in Sense and Sensibility
1  She is a good-hearted girl as ever lived.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
2  He lived to exert, and frequently to enjoy himself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
3  As good a kind of fellow as ever lived, I assure you.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
4  He was four years with my uncle, who lives at Longstaple, near Plymouth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
5  "He is as good a sort of fellow, I believe, as ever lived," repeated Sir John.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
6  We shall live within a few miles of each other, and shall meet every day of our lives.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
7  The house was large and handsome; and the Middletons lived in a style of equal hospitality and elegance.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
8  If the impertinent remarks of Mrs. Jennings are to be the proof of impropriety in conduct, we are all offending every moment of our lives.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
9  She had only two daughters, both of whom she had lived to see respectably married, and she had now therefore nothing to do but to marry all the rest of the world.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
10  The late owner of this estate was a single man, who lived to a very advanced age, and who for many years of his life, had a constant companion and housekeeper in his sister.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
11  She resigned herself at first to all the misery of her situation; and happy had it been if she had not lived to overcome those regrets which the remembrance of me occasioned.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
12  She vowed at first she would never trim me up a new bonnet, nor do any thing else for me again, so long as she lived; but now she is quite come to, and we are as good friends as ever.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
13  His estate had been rated by Sir John at about six or seven hundred a year; but he lived at an expense to which that income could hardly be equal, and he had himself often complained of his poverty.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
14  Even Lady Middleton took the trouble of being delighted, which was putting herself rather out of her way; and as for the Miss Steeles, especially Lucy, they had never been so happy in their lives as this intelligence made them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
15  Their estate was large, and their residence was at Norland Park, in the centre of their property, where, for many generations, they had lived in so respectable a manner as to engage the general good opinion of their surrounding acquaintance.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
16  She thought it probable that as they lived in the same county, Mrs. Palmer might be able to give some more particular account of Willoughby's general character, than could be gathered from the Middletons' partial acquaintance with him; and she was eager to gain from any one, such a confirmation of his merits as might remove the possibility of fear from Marianne.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
17  They settled in town, received very liberal assistance from Mrs. Ferrars, were on the best terms imaginable with the Dashwoods; and setting aside the jealousies and ill-will continually subsisting between Fanny and Lucy, in which their husbands of course took a part, as well as the frequent domestic disagreements between Robert and Lucy themselves, nothing could exceed the harmony in which they all lived together.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50
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