MEAN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Mean in Sense and Sensibility
1  You must not confound my meaning.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17
2  "We can mean no other," cried Lucy, smiling.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
3  "I would not wish to do any thing mean," he replied.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
4  My father certainly could mean nothing more by his request to me than what you say.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
5  "You mean to go to Delaford after them I suppose," said Elinor, with a faint smile.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 40
6  You mean," answered Elinor, with forced calmness, "Mr. Willoughby's marriage with Miss Grey.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
7  I do not mean to complain, however; it is undoubtedly a comfortable one, and I hope will in time be better.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
8  Upon my word," replied Elinor, "I cannot tell you, for I do not perfectly comprehend the meaning of the word.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
9  In short, I do not mean to reflect upon the behaviour of any person whom you have a regard for, Mrs. Jennings.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
10  But it was then too late, and with a countenance meaning to be open, she sat down again and talked of the weather.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48
11  They mean no less to be civil and kind to us now," said Elinor, "by these frequent invitations, than by those which we received from them a few weeks ago.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
12  And yet I do assure you," replied Lucy, her little sharp eyes full of meaning, "there seemed to me to be a coldness and displeasure in your manner that made me quite uncomfortable.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24
13  Mrs. John Dashwood wished it likewise; but in the mean while, till one of these superior blessings could be attained, it would have quieted her ambition to see him driving a barouche.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
14  Colonel Brandon, who was here only ten minutes ago, has desired me to say, that understanding you mean to take orders, he has great pleasure in offering you the living of Delaford now just vacant, and only wishes it were more valuable.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 40
15  Edward saw enough to comprehend, not only the meaning of others, but such of Marianne's expressions as had puzzled him before; and when their visitors left them, he went immediately round her, and said, in a whisper, "I have been guessing."
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
16  This was all overheard by Miss Dashwood; and in the whole of the sentence, in his manner of pronouncing it, and in his addressing her sister by her Christian name alone, she instantly saw an intimacy so decided, a meaning so direct, as marked a perfect agreement between them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
17  In the mean time, till all these alterations could be made from the savings of an income of five hundred a-year by a woman who never saved in her life, they were wise enough to be contented with the house as it was; and each of them was busy in arranging their particular concerns, and endeavoring, by placing around them books and other possessions, to form themselves a home.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
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