MEAT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Meat in Great Expectations
1  She came back, with some bread and meat and a little mug of beer.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
2  I found Herbert dining on cold meat, and delighted to welcome me back.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXX
3  Around his neck was slung a tin bottle, as I had often seen his meat and drink slung about him in other days.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIII
4  The bread and meat were acceptable, and the beer was warming and tingling, and I was soon in spirits to look about me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
5  She put the mug down on the stones of the yard, and gave me the bread and meat without looking at me, as insolently as if I were a dog in disgrace.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
6  The bull-like proceeding last mentioned, besides that it was unquestionably to be regarded in the light of a liberty, was particularly disagreeable just after bread and meat.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
7  That, if Joe knew it, I never afterwards could see him glance, however casually, at yesterday's meat or pudding when it came on to-day's table, without thinking that he was debating whether I had been in the pantry.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VI
8  Nothing less than the frosty light of the cheerful sky, the sight of people passing beyond the bars of the court-yard gate, and the reviving influence of the rest of the bread and meat and beer, would have brought me round.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII