MRS. FERRARS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Mrs. Ferrars in Sense and Sensibility
1  Elinor's curiosity to see Mrs. Ferrars was satisfied.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
2  Mrs. Ferrars is a charming woman, and so is your sister.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
3  I am sure I should have seen it in a moment, if Mrs. Ferrars had took a dislike to me.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
4  What poor Mrs. Ferrars suffered, when first Fanny broke it to her, is not to be described.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
5  They were to meet Mrs. Ferrars; but Elinor could not learn whether her sons were to be of the party.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
6  A thousand a-year is a great deal for a mother to give away, to make over for ever; but Mrs. Ferrars has a noble spirit.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
7  Mrs. Ferrars, with the utmost liberality, will come forward, and settle on him a thousand a year, if the match takes place.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
8  Mrs. Ferrars was a little, thin woman, upright, even to formality, in her figure, and serious, even to sourness, in her aspect.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
9  Elinor DID think the question a very odd one, and her countenance expressed it, as she answered that she had never seen Mrs. Ferrars.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
10  What Mrs. Ferrars would say and do, though there could not be a doubt of its nature, she was anxious to hear; and still more anxious to know how Edward would conduct himself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
11  His want of spirits, of openness, and of consistency, were most usually attributed to his want of independence, and his better knowledge of Mrs. Ferrars's disposition and designs.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
12  I wished very much to call upon you yesterday," said he, "but it was impossible, for we were obliged to take Harry to see the wild beasts at Exeter Exchange; and we spent the rest of the day with Mrs. Ferrars.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
13  The good understanding between the Colonel and Miss Dashwood seemed rather to declare that the honours of the mulberry-tree, the canal, and the yew arbour, would all be made over to HER; and Mrs. Jennings had, for some time ceased to think at all of Mrs. Ferrars.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
14  Mrs. Ferrars, not aware of their being Elinor's work, particularly requested to look at them; and after they had received gratifying testimony of Lady Middletons's approbation, Fanny presented them to her mother, considerately informing her, at the same time, that they were done by Miss Dashwood.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
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15  Not a soul of all my relations know of it but Anne, and I never should have mentioned it to you, if I had not felt the greatest dependence in the world upon your secrecy; and I really thought my behaviour in asking so many questions about Mrs. Ferrars must seem so odd, that it ought to be explained.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
16  Elinor, having once delivered her opinion on William's side, by which she offended Mrs. Ferrars and Fanny still more, did not see the necessity of enforcing it by any farther assertion; and Marianne, when called on for hers, offended them all, by declaring that she had no opinion to give, as she had never thought about it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
17  She took the first opportunity of affronting her mother-in-law on the occasion, talking to her so expressively of her brother's great expectations, of Mrs. Ferrars's resolution that both her sons should marry well, and of the danger attending any young woman who attempted to DRAW HIM IN; that Mrs. Dashwood could neither pretend to be unconscious, nor endeavor to be calm.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
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