MRS. JOE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Mrs. Joe in Great Expectations
1  It was too much for Mrs. Joe, who immediately rose.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
2  I held on tight, while Mrs. Joe and Joe ran to him.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
3  Mrs. Joe has been out a dozen times, looking for you, Pip.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
4  I had begun by asking questions, and I was going to rob Mrs. Joe.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
5  Mrs. Joe, who always took explanations upon herself, said, snappishly, "Escaped."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
6  All this time Mrs. Joe and Joe were briskly clearing the table for the pie and pudding.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
7  The sergeant and I were in the kitchen when Mrs. Joe stood staring; at which crisis I partially recovered the use of my senses.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
8  I knew Mrs. Joe's housekeeping to be of the strictest kind, and that my larcenous researches might find nothing available in the safe.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
9  Mrs. Joe was a very clean housekeeper, but had an exquisite art of making her cleanliness more uncomfortable and unacceptable than dirt itself.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
10  After that, he sat feeling his right-side flaxen curls and whisker, and following Mrs. Joe about with his blue eyes, as his manner always was at squally times.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
11  My sister, Mrs. Joe, throwing the door wide open, and finding an obstruction behind it, immediately divined the cause, and applied Tickler to its further investigation.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
12  The terrors that had assailed me whenever Mrs. Joe had gone near the pantry, or out of the room, were only to be equalled by the remorse with which my mind dwelt on what my hands had done.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
13  Some medical beast had revived Tar-water in those days as a fine medicine, and Mrs. Joe always kept a supply of it in the cupboard; having a belief in its virtues correspondent to its nastiness.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
14  My sister, Mrs. Joe, with black hair and eyes, had such a prevailing redness of skin that I sometimes used to wonder whether it was possible she washed herself with a nutmeg-grater instead of soap.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
15  I noticed that Mr. Pumblechook in his hospitality appeared to forget that he had made a present of the wine, but took the bottle from Mrs. Joe and had all the credit of handing it about in a gush of joviality.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
16  On this particular evening the urgency of my case demanded a pint of this mixture, which was poured down my throat, for my greater comfort, while Mrs. Joe held my head under her arm, as a boot would be held in a bootjack.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
17  Joe, who had ventured into the kitchen after me as the dustpan had retired before us, drew the back of his hand across his nose with a conciliatory air, when Mrs. Joe darted a look at him, and, when her eyes were withdrawn, secretly crossed his two forefingers, and exhibited them to me, as our token that Mrs. Joe was in a cross temper.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
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