PARTY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Party in Sense and Sensibility
1  The alteration is not in them, if their parties are grown tedious and dull.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
2  Colonel Brandon alone, of all the party, heard her without being in raptures.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
3  Perhaps, then, it would be better for all parties, if the sum were diminished one half.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
4  On every formal visit a child ought to be of the party, by way of provision for discourse.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
5  He hoped they would all excuse the smallness of the party, and could assure them it should never happen so again.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
6  If their evenings at the park were concluded with cards, he cheated himself and all the rest of the party to get her a good hand.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
7  The private balls at the park then began; and parties on the water were made and accomplished as often as a showery October would allow.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
8  The young ladies, as well as their mother, were perfectly satisfied with having two entire strangers of the party, and wished for no more.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
9  He made no answer; and soon afterwards, by the removal of the tea-things, and the arrangement of the card parties, the subject was necessarily dropped.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
10  Lady Middleton piqued herself upon the elegance of her table, and of all her domestic arrangements; and from this kind of vanity was her greatest enjoyment in any of their parties.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
11  Very early in April, and tolerably early in the day, the two parties from Hanover Square and Berkeley Street set out from their respective homes, to meet, by appointment, on the road.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42
12  The grounds were declared to be highly beautiful, and Sir John, who was particularly warm in their praise, might be allowed to be a tolerable judge, for he had formed parties to visit them, at least, twice every summer for the last ten years.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
13  They contained a noble piece of water; a sail on which was to a form a great part of the morning's amusement; cold provisions were to be taken, open carriages only to be employed, and every thing conducted in the usual style of a complete party of pleasure.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
14  Pleased to find herself more comfortably situated in that particular than she had expected, Elinor was very willing to compound for the want of much real enjoyment from any of their evening parties, which, whether at home or abroad, formed only for cards, could have little to amuse her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
15  He was a blessing to all the juvenile part of the neighbourhood, for in summer he was for ever forming parties to eat cold ham and chicken out of doors, and in winter his private balls were numerous enough for any young lady who was not suffering under the unsatiable appetite of fifteen.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
16  A party was formed this evening for going on the following day to see a very fine place about twelve miles from Barton, belonging to a brother-in-law of Colonel Brandon, without whose interest it could not be seen, as the proprietor, who was then abroad, had left strict orders on that head.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
17  The party, like other musical parties, comprehended a great many people who had real taste for the performance, and a great many more who had none at all; and the performers themselves were, as usual, in their own estimation, and that of their immediate friends, the first private performers in England.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
18  There was nothing in any of the party which could recommend them as companions to the Dashwoods; but the cold insipidity of Lady Middleton was so particularly repulsive, that in comparison of it the gravity of Colonel Brandon, and even the boisterous mirth of Sir John and his mother-in-law was interesting.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
19  Elinor was obliged, though unwillingly, to believe that the sentiments which Mrs. Jennings had assigned him for her own satisfaction, were now actually excited by her sister; and that however a general resemblance of disposition between the parties might forward the affection of Mr. Willoughby, an equally striking opposition of character was no hindrance to the regard of Colonel Brandon.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
20  In every meeting of the kind Willoughby was included; and the ease and familiarity which naturally attended these parties were exactly calculated to give increasing intimacy to his acquaintance with the Dashwoods, to afford him opportunity of witnessing the excellencies of Marianne, of marking his animated admiration of her, and of receiving, in her behaviour to himself, the most pointed assurance of her affection.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11