SENSE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Sense in Sense and Sensibility
1  Shyness is only the effect of a sense of inferiority in some way or other.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17
2  Lucy does not want sense, and that is the foundation on which every thing good may be built.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
3  My protege, as you call him, is a sensible man; and sense will always have attractions for me.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
4  Do not be offended, Elinor, if my praise of him is not in every thing equal to your sense of his merits.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
5  Elinor needed little observation to perceive that her reserve was a mere calmness of manner with which sense had nothing to do.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
6  Of his sense and his goodness," continued Elinor, "no one can, I think, be in doubt, who has seen him often enough to engage him in unreserved conversation.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
7  Her husband was a grave looking young man of five or six and twenty, with an air of more fashion and sense than his wife, but of less willingness to please or be pleased.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
8  The servant, who saw only that Miss Marianne was taken ill, had sense enough to call one of the maids, who, with Mrs. Dashwood's assistance, supported her into the other room.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47
9  I have not had so many opportunities of estimating the minuter propensities of his mind, his inclinations and tastes, as you have; but I have the highest opinion in the world of his goodness and sense.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
10  They had too much sense to be desirable companions to the former; and by the latter they were considered with a jealous eye, as intruding on THEIR ground, and sharing the kindness which they wanted to monopolize.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
11  Elinor thought this generosity overstrained, considering her sister's youth, and urged the matter farther, but in vain; common sense, common care, common prudence, were all sunk in Mrs. Dashwood's romantic delicacy.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
12  She was stronger alone, and her own good sense so well supported her, that her firmness was as unshaken, her appearance of cheerfulness as invariable, as with regrets so poignant and so fresh, it was possible for them to be.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
13  Margaret, the other sister, was a good-humored, well-disposed girl; but as she had already imbibed a good deal of Marianne's romance, without having much of her sense, she did not, at thirteen, bid fair to equal her sisters at a more advanced period of life.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
14  It was a valued, a precious trust to me; and gladly would I have discharged it in the strictest sense, by watching over her education myself, had the nature of our situations allowed it; but I had no family, no home; and my little Eliza was therefore placed at school.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
15  Mrs. Jennings would have persuaded her, at its conclusion, to take some rest before her mother's arrival, and allow HER to take her place by Marianne; but Elinor had no sense of fatigue, no capability of sleep at that moment about her, and she was not to be kept away from her sister an unnecessary instant.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43
16  He was received by Mrs. Dashwood with more than politeness; with a kindness which Sir John's account of him and her own gratitude prompted; and every thing that passed during the visit tended to assure him of the sense, elegance, mutual affection, and domestic comfort of the family to whom accident had now introduced him.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
17  Their resemblance in good principles and good sense, in disposition and manner of thinking, would probably have been sufficient to unite them in friendship, without any other attraction; but their being in love with two sisters, and two sisters fond of each other, made that mutual regard inevitable and immediate, which might otherwise have waited the effect of time and judgment.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49
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