SIR JOHN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Sir John in Sense and Sensibility
1  Sir John was a sportsman, Lady Middleton a mother.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
2  Sir John Middleton was a good looking man about forty.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
3  The former was for Sir John's gratification, the latter for that of his lady.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
4  Sir John was loud in his admiration at the end of every song, and as loud in his conversation with the others while every song lasted.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
5  Lady Middleton had the advantage of being able to spoil her children all the year round, while Sir John's independent employments were in existence only half the time.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
6  But Sir John's satisfaction in society was much more real; he delighted in collecting about him more young people than his house would hold, and the noisier they were the better was he pleased.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
7  Colonel Brandon, the friend of Sir John, seemed no more adapted by resemblance of manner to be his friend, than Lady Middleton was to be his wife, or Mrs. Jennings to be Lady Middleton's mother.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
8  Continual engagements at home and abroad, however, supplied all the deficiencies of nature and education; supported the good spirits of Sir John, and gave exercise to the good breeding of his wife.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
9  An opportunity was soon to be given to the Dashwoods of debating on the rest of the children, as Sir John would not leave the house without securing their promise of dining at the park the next day.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
10  Sir John Middleton, who called on them every day for the first fortnight, and who was not in the habit of seeing much occupation at home, could not conceal his amazement on finding them always employed.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
11  In a very few weeks from the day which brought Sir John Middleton's first letter to Norland, every thing was so far settled in their future abode as to enable Mrs. Dashwood and her daughters to begin their journey.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
12  Mrs. Jennings had been anxious to see Colonel Brandon well married, ever since her connection with Sir John first brought him to her knowledge; and she was always anxious to get a good husband for every pretty girl.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
13  She instantly wrote Sir John Middleton her acknowledgment of his kindness, and her acceptance of his proposal; and then hastened to shew both letters to her daughters, that she might be secure of their approbation before her answer were sent.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
14  Sir John called on them as soon as the next interval of fair weather that morning allowed him to get out of doors; and Marianne's accident being related to him, he was eagerly asked whether he knew any gentleman of the name of Willoughby at Allenham.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
15  There was nothing in any of the party which could recommend them as companions to the Dashwoods; but the cold insipidity of Lady Middleton was so particularly repulsive, that in comparison of it the gravity of Colonel Brandon, and even the boisterous mirth of Sir John and his mother-in-law was interesting.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
16  Mrs. Dashwood and her daughters were met at the door of the house by Sir John, who welcomed them to Barton Park with unaffected sincerity; and as he attended them to the drawing room repeated to the young ladies the concern which the same subject had drawn from him the day before, at being unable to get any smart young men to meet them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
17  Their visitors, except those from Barton Park, were not many; for, in spite of Sir John's urgent entreaties that they would mix more in the neighbourhood, and repeated assurances of his carriage being always at their service, the independence of Mrs. Dashwood's spirit overcame the wish of society for her children; and she was resolute in declining to visit any family beyond the distance of a walk.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
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