SPEECH in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Speech in Sense and Sensibility
1  This speech at first puzzled Mrs. Jennings exceedingly.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 40
2  They all looked their assent; it seemed too awful a moment for speech.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
3  Lady Middleton looked as if she thanked heaven that SHE had never made so rude a speech.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
4  Another pause therefore of many minutes' duration, succeeded this speech, and Lucy was still the first to end it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24
5  Mrs. Dashwood felt too much for speech, and instantly quitted the parlour to give way in solitude to the concern and alarm which this sudden departure occasioned.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
6  Elinor did not quite understand the beginning of Mrs. Jennings's speech, neither did she think it worth inquiring into; and therefore only replied to its conclusion.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 40
7  Elinor's thanks followed this speech with grateful earnestness; attended too with the assurance of her expecting material advantage to Marianne, from the communication of what had passed.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
8  Elinor, dreading her being tired, led her towards home; and till they reached the door of the cottage, easily conjecturing what her curiosity must be though no question was suffered to speak it, talked of nothing but Willoughby, and their conversation together; and was carefully minute in every particular of speech and look, where minuteness could be safely indulged.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46