WINE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - Wine in Great Expectations
1  "Here is wine," said Mr. Pumblechook.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XIX
2  And we all had cake and wine on gold plates.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter IX
3  But Mr. Pumblechook said, sharply, "Give him wine, Mum."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter V
4  Well," said Wemmick, "he'll give you wine, and good wine.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXIV
5  He actually seemed to serve as a zest to Mr. Jaggers's wine.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXVI
6  He cross-examined his very wine when he had nothing else in hand.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXIX
7  Wemmick drank a glass of wine, and looked with a grimly satisfied air at Mr. Jaggers, but not at me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XLVIII
8  I did the same; and if I had turned myself upside down before drinking, the wine could not have gone more direct to my head.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XIX
9  At about this time, I began to observe that he was getting flushed in the face; as to myself, I felt all face, steeped in wine and smarting.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XIX
10  And he was so very free of the wine that he even called for the other bottle, and handed that about with the same liberality, when the first was gone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter V
11  She withdrew her hands and went out of the room, and Mr. Jaggers, putting the decanters on from his dumb-waiter, filled his glass and passed round the wine.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXVI
12  I'll engage there's no Tar in that: so, the sergeant thanked him and said that as he preferred his drink without tar, he would take wine, if it was equally convenient.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter V
13  I noticed that Mr. Pumblechook in his hospitality appeared to forget that he had made a present of the wine, but took the bottle from Mrs. Joe and had all the credit of handing it about in a gush of joviality.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter V
14  I was made very uneasy in my mind by Mrs. Pocket's falling into a discussion with Drummle respecting two baronetcies, while she ate a sliced orange steeped in sugar and wine, and, forgetting all about the baby on her lap, who did most appalling things with the nut-crackers.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXIII
15  Three or four times I feebly thought I would start conversation; but whenever he saw me going to ask him anything, he looked at me with his glass in his hand, and rolling his wine about in his mouth, as if requesting me to take notice that it was of no use, for he couldn't answer.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXIX
16  He held it between himself and the candle, tasted the port, rolled it in his mouth, swallowed it, looked at his glass again, smelt the port, tried it, drank it, filled again, and cross-examined the glass again, until I was as nervous as if I had known the wine to be telling him something to my disadvantage.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXIX
17  Pretending to read a smeary newspaper long out of date, which had nothing half so legible in its local news, as the foreign matter of coffee, pickles, fish sauces, gravy, melted butter, and wine with which it was sprinkled all over, as if it had taken the measles in a highly irregular form, I sat at my table while he stood before the fire.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XLIII
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.