WOPSLE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Wopsle in Great Expectations
1  I saw reawakening appetite in the Roman nostrils of Mr. Wopsle.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
2  "Unless in that form," said Mr. Wopsle, nodding towards the dish.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
3  There was a fiction that Mr. Wopsle "examined" the scholars once a quarter.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
4  Mr. Wopsle had been for going back, but Joe was resolved to see it out, so we went on with the party.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
5  Mr. Wopsle, Joe, and I, received strict charge to keep in the rear, and to speak no word after we reached the marshes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
6  Mr. Pumblechook and Mr. Hubble declined, on the plea of a pipe and ladies' society; but Mr. Wopsle said he would go, if Joe would.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
7  Anyhow, Mr. Wopsle's Roman nose so aggravated me, during the recital of my misdemeanours, that I should have liked to pull it until he howled.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
8  Biddy was Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt's granddaughter; I confess myself quiet unequal to the working out of the problem, what relation she was to Mr. Wopsle.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
9  Mr. Wopsle had greatly alarmed me more than once, by his blowing and hard breathing; but I knew the sounds by this time, and could dissociate them from the object of pursuit.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
10  There I was, on Joe's back, and there was Joe beneath me, charging at the ditches like a hunter, and stimulating Mr. Wopsle not to tumble on his Roman nose, and to keep up with us.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
11  It was not with me then, as it was in later life, when I fell into the society of the Passions, and compared them with Collins and Wopsle, rather to the disadvantage of both gentlemen.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
12  She rented a small cottage, and Mr. Wopsle had the room up stairs, where we students used to overhear him reading aloud in a most dignified and terrific manner, and occasionally bumping on the ceiling.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
13  Much of my unassisted self, and more by the help of Biddy than of Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt, I struggled through the alphabet as if it had been a bramble-bush; getting considerably worried and scratched by every letter.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
14  This was always followed by Collins's Ode on the Passions, wherein I particularly venerated Mr. Wopsle as Revenge throwing his blood-stained sword in thunder down, and taking the War-denouncing trumpet with a withering look.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
15  He must have had a tiresome journey of it, for Mr. Wopsle, being knocked up, was in such a very bad temper that if the Church had been thrown open, he would probably have excommunicated the whole expedition, beginning with Joe and myself.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VI
16  Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt kept an evening school in the village; that is to say, she was a ridiculous old woman of limited means and unlimited infirmity, who used to go to sleep from six to seven every evening, in the society of youth who paid two pence per week each, for the improving opportunity of seeing her do it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
17  Mr. Wopsle, united to a Roman nose and a large shining bald forehead, had a deep voice which he was uncommonly proud of; indeed it was understood among his acquaintance that if you could only give him his head, he would read the clergyman into fits; he himself confessed that if the Church was "thrown open," meaning to competition, he would not despair of making his mark in it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
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