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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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1  Firstly, my mind was too preoccupied to be able to take in the subject clearly.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LV
2  In time I were able to keep him, and I kep him till he went off in a purple leptic fit.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
3  I am rather bare here, but I hope you'll be able to make out tolerably well till Monday.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXI
4  All this time I had never been able to consider my own situation, nor could I do so yet.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XL
5  As I was not able to cut my dinner, the old landlord with a shining bald head did it for me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LII
6  It is strange to know no more about either, and particularly you, than I was able to tell last night.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLI
7  That there were, still living, people enough who were able and willing to identify him, I could not doubt.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
8  He bent down so low to frown at his boots, that he was able to rub the calves of his legs in the pause he made.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVI
9  At the time when I stood in the churchyard reading the family tombstones, I had just enough learning to be able to spell them out.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
10  I could answer this inquiry with a better heart than I had been able to find for the other question, and I said I was quite willing.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
11  Not to make Joe uneasy by talking too much, even if I had been able to talk much, I deferred asking him about Miss Havisham until next day.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVII
12  He hoped that with intelligent assistance I should meet with little to discourage me, and should soon be able to dispense with any aid but his.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIV
13  I dropped my face into my hands, but was able to control myself better than I could have expected, considering what agony it gave me to hear her say those words.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
14  Herbert got a large bottle of stuff for my arm; and by dint of having this stuff dropped over it all the night through, I was just able to bear its pain on the journey.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIII
15  Now, there was no reasonable evidence to implicate any person but this woman, and on the improbabilities of her having been able to do it Mr. Jaggers principally rested his case.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
16  Curious to know whether Biddy suspected him of having had a hand in that murderous attack of which my sister had never been able to give any account, I asked her why she did not like him.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
17  What I had meant was, that when I came into my property and was able to do something for Joe, it would have been much more agreeable if he had been better qualified for a rise in station.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
18  How Joe got out of the room, I have never been able to determine; but I know that when he did get out he was steadily proceeding up stairs instead of coming down, and was deaf to all remonstrances until I went after him and laid hold of him.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIII
19  You will find your credit good, Mr. Pip," said my guardian, whose flask of sherry smelt like a whole caskful, as he hastily refreshed himself, "but I shall by this means be able to check your bills, and to pull you up if I find you outrunning the constable.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
20  The noble boy in the ancestral boots was inconsistent, representing himself, as it were in one breath, as an able seaman, a strolling actor, a grave-digger, a clergyman, and a person of the utmost importance at a Court fencing-match, on the authority of whose practised eye and nice discrimination the finest strokes were judged.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXI