ABLE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - able in Sense and Sensibility
1  Her sister was perhaps laid down upon the bed, or in her dressing gown, and therefore not able to come to them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
2  Tell me what it is, explain the grounds on which you acted, and I shall be satisfied, in being able to satisfy you.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
3  She had raised herself from the ground, but her foot had been twisted in her fall, and she was scarcely able to stand.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
4  But tomorrow I think I shall certainly be able to call in Berkeley Street, and be introduced to your friend Mrs. Jennings.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
5  Marianne would have thought herself very inexcusable had she been able to sleep at all the first night after parting from Willoughby.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
6  She was not immediately able to say anything, and even when her spirits were recovered, she debated for a short time, on the answer it would be most proper to give.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
7  Lady Middleton had the advantage of being able to spoil her children all the year round, while Sir John's independent employments were in existence only half the time.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
8  We three shall be able to go very well in my chaise; and when we are in town, if you do not like to go wherever I do, well and good, you may always go with one of my daughters.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
9  Mr. Dashwood attended them down stairs, was introduced to Mrs. Jennings at the door of her carriage, and repeating his hope of being able to call on them the next day, took leave.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
10  I begged him to exert himself for fear you should suspect what was the matter; but it made him so melancholy, not being able to stay more than a fortnight with us, and seeing me so much affected.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
11  You decide on his imperfections so much in the mass," replied Elinor, "and so much on the strength of your own imagination, that the commendation I am able to give of him is comparatively cold and insipid.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
12  I thank you, ma'am, sincerely thank you," said Marianne, with warmth: "your invitation has insured my gratitude for ever, and it would give me such happiness, yes, almost the greatest happiness I am capable of, to be able to accept it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
13  Mrs. Jennings left them earlier than usual; for she could not be easy till the Middletons and Palmers were able to grieve as much as herself; and positively refusing Elinor's offered attendance, went out alone for the rest of the morning.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
14  Mrs. Dashwood had never been so much pleased with any young women in her life, as she was with them; had given each of them a needle book made by some emigrant; called Lucy by her Christian name; and did not know whether she should ever be able to part with them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
15  The house and the garden, with all the objects surrounding them, were now become familiar, and the ordinary pursuits which had given to Norland half its charms were engaged in again with far greater enjoyment than Norland had been able to afford, since the loss of their father.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
16  Elinor, who saw as plainly by this, as if she had seen the direction, that it must come from Willoughby, felt immediately such a sickness at heart as made her hardly able to hold up her head, and sat in such a general tremour as made her fear it impossible to escape Mrs. Jennings's notice.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
17  She thought it probable that as they lived in the same county, Mrs. Palmer might be able to give some more particular account of Willoughby's general character, than could be gathered from the Middletons' partial acquaintance with him; and she was eager to gain from any one, such a confirmation of his merits as might remove the possibility of fear from Marianne.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
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