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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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1  Now, I ain't alone, as you may think I am.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
2  My thoughts strayed from that question as I looked disconsolately at the fire.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
3  Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
4  After each question he tilted me over a little more, so as to give me a greater sense of helplessness and danger.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
5  It was as if I had to make up my mind to leap from the top of a high house, or plunge into a great depth of water.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
6  The man was limping on towards this latter, as if he were the pirate come to life, and come down, and going back to hook himself up again.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
7  It gave me a terrible turn when I thought so; and as I saw the cattle lifting their heads to gaze after him, I wondered whether they thought so too.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
8  After that, he sat feeling his right-side flaxen curls and whisker, and following Mrs. Joe about with his blue eyes, as his manner always was at squally times.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
9  You do it, and you never dare to say a word or dare to make a sign concerning your having seen such a person as me, or any person sumever, and you shall be let to live.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
10  Joe and I being fellow-sufferers, and having confidences as such, Joe imparted a confidence to me, the moment I raised the latch of the door and peeped in at him opposite to it, sitting in the chimney corner.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
11  You know, Pip," said Joe, solemnly, with his last bite in his cheek, and speaking in a confidential voice, as if we two were quite alone, "you and me is always friends, and I'd be the last to tell upon you, any time.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
12  As she applied herself to set the tea-things, Joe peeped down at me over his leg, as if he were mentally casting me and himself up, and calculating what kind of pair we practically should make, under the grievous circumstances foreshadowed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
13  After darkly looking at his leg and me several times, he came closer to my tombstone, took me by both arms, and tilted me back as far as he could hold me; so that his eyes looked most powerfully down into mine, and mine looked most helplessly up into his.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
14  A man who had been soaked in water, and smothered in mud, and lamed by stones, and cut by flints, and stung by nettles, and torn by briars; who limped, and shivered, and glared, and growled; and whose teeth chattered in his head as he seized me by the chin.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
15  Having at that time to find out for myself what the expression meant, and knowing her to have a hard and heavy hand, and to be much in the habit of laying it upon her husband as well as upon me, I supposed that Joe Gargery and I were both brought up by hand.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
16  The marshes were just a long black horizontal line then, as I stopped to look after him; and the river was just another horizontal line, not nearly so broad nor yet so black; and the sky was just a row of long angry red lines and dense black lines intermixed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
17  As I saw him go, picking his way among the nettles, and among the brambles that bound the green mounds, he looked in my young eyes as if he were eluding the hands of the dead people, stretching up cautiously out of their graves, to get a twist upon his ankle and pull him in.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
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