BABY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - baby in Great Expectations
1  The baby was the soul of honor, and protested with all its might.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
2  For you were not brought up in that strange house from a mere baby.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIII
3  Her mother died when she was a baby, and her father denied her nothing.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
4  There were four little girls, and two little boys, besides the baby who might have been either, and the baby's next successor who was as yet neither.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
5  At the moment of my arrival, he had just finished putting somebody's hat into black long-clothes, like an African baby; so he held out his hand for mine.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXV
6  I acted in the capacity of backer, or best-man, to the bridegroom; while a little limp pew-opener in a soft bonnet like a baby's, made a feint of being the bosom friend of Miss Skiffins.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LV
7  One of the little girls, a mere mite who seemed to have prematurely taken upon herself some charge of the others, stepped out of her place by me, and danced to and from the baby until it left off crying, and laughed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
8  I was made very uneasy in my mind by Mrs. Pocket's falling into a discussion with Drummle respecting two baronetcies, while she ate a sliced orange steeped in sugar and wine, and, forgetting all about the baby on her lap, who did most appalling things with the nut-crackers.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
9  Flopson, by dint of doubling the baby at the joints like a Dutch doll, then got it safely into Mrs. Pocket's lap, and gave it the nut-crackers to play with; at the same time recommending Mrs. Pocket to take notice that the handles of that instrument were not likely to agree with its eyes, and sharply charging Miss Jane to look after the same.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
10  I was at a loss to account for this surprising circumstance, and could not help giving my mind to speculations about it, until by and by Millers came down with the baby, which baby was handed to Flopson, which Flopson was handing it to Mrs. Pocket, when she too went fairly head foremost over Mrs. Pocket, baby and all, and was caught by Herbert and myself.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII