BEAUTY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - beauty in Sense and Sensibility
1  The whole country about them abounded in beautiful walks.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
2  There was something in her style of beauty, to please them particularly.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
3  The merest awkward country girl, without style, or elegance, and almost without beauty.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41
4  However, I got a very good husband, and I don't know what the greatest beauty can do more.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
5  Every body pretends to feel and tries to describe with the taste and elegance of him who first defined what picturesque beauty was.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
6  The third day succeeding their knowledge of the particulars, was so fine, so beautiful a Sunday as to draw many to Kensington Gardens, though it was only the second week in March.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38
7  You know what he thinks of Cowper and Scott; you are certain of his estimating their beauties as he ought, and you have received every assurance of his admiring Pope no more than is proper.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
8  And they both long to see you of all things, for they have heard at Exeter that you are the most beautiful creatures in the world; and I have told them it is all very true, and a great deal more.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
9  His manly beauty and more than common gracefulness were instantly the theme of general admiration, and the laugh which his gallantry raised against Marianne received particular spirit from his exterior attractions.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
10  On one side you look across the bowling-green, behind the house, to a beautiful hanging wood, and on the other you have a view of the church and village, and, beyond them, of those fine bold hills that we have so often admired.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
11  The grounds were declared to be highly beautiful, and Sir John, who was particularly warm in their praise, might be allowed to be a tolerable judge, for he had formed parties to visit them, at least, twice every summer for the last ten years.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
12  Because he believes many people pretend to more admiration of the beauties of nature than they really feel, and is disgusted with such pretensions, he affects greater indifference and less discrimination in viewing them himself than he possesses.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
13  She sat in silence almost all the way, wrapt in her own meditations, and scarcely ever voluntarily speaking, except when any object of picturesque beauty within their view drew from her an exclamation of delight exclusively addressed to her sister.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
14  The vulgar freedom and folly of the eldest left her no recommendation, and as Elinor was not blinded by the beauty, or the shrewd look of the youngest, to her want of real elegance and artlessness, she left the house without any wish of knowing them better.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
15  Her complexion was sallow; and her features small, without beauty, and naturally without expression; but a lucky contraction of the brow had rescued her countenance from the disgrace of insipidity, by giving it the strong characters of pride and ill nature.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
16  Had he been even old, ugly, and vulgar, the gratitude and kindness of Mrs. Dashwood would have been secured by any act of attention to her child; but the influence of youth, beauty, and elegance, gave an interest to the action which came home to her feelings.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
17  Her form, though not so correct as her sister's, in having the advantage of height, was more striking; and her face was so lovely, that when in the common cant of praise, she was called a beautiful girl, truth was less violently outraged than usually happens.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
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