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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - bed in Sense and Sensibility
1  Let her name her own supper, and go to bed.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
2  No other visitor appeared that evening, and the ladies were unanimous in agreeing to go early to bed.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
3  Her sister was perhaps laid down upon the bed, or in her dressing gown, and therefore not able to come to them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
4  Mrs. Dashwood WOULD sit up with her all night; and Elinor, in compliance with her mother's entreaty, went to bed.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45
5  She would have been ashamed to look her family in the face the next morning, had she not risen from her bed in more need of repose than when she lay down in it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
6  Some lavender drops, however, which she was at length persuaded to take, were of use; and from that time till Mrs. Jennings returned, she continued on the bed quiet and motionless.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
7  She was soon undressed and in bed, and as she seemed desirous of being alone, her sister then left her, and while she waited the return of Mrs. Jennings, had leisure enough for thinking over the past.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
8  Mrs. Jennings, knowing nothing of any change in the patient, went unusually early to bed; her maid, who was one of the principal nurses, was recreating herself in the housekeeper's room, and Elinor remained alone with Marianne.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43
9  Elinor drew near, but without saying a word; and seating herself on the bed, took her hand, kissed her affectionately several times, and then gave way to a burst of tears, which at first was scarcely less violent than Marianne's.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
10  Though heavy and feverish, with a pain in her limbs, and a cough, and a sore throat, a good night's rest was to cure her entirely; and it was with difficulty that Elinor prevailed on her, when she went to bed, to try one or two of the simplest of the remedies.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42
11  A very restless and feverish night, however, disappointed the expectation of both; and when Marianne, after persisting in rising, confessed herself unable to sit up, and returned voluntarily to her bed, Elinor was very ready to adopt Mrs. Jennings's advice, of sending for the Palmers' apothecary.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43
12  Her sister, however, still sanguine, was willing to attribute the change to nothing more than the fatigue of having sat up to have her bed made; and carefully administering the cordials prescribed, saw her, with satisfaction, sink at last into a slumber, from which she expected the most beneficial effects.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43
13  Mrs. Jennings laughed again, but Elinor had not spirits to say more, and eager at all events to know what Willoughby had written, hurried away to their room, where, on opening the door, she saw Marianne stretched on the bed, almost choked by grief, one letter in her hand, and two or three others laying by her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
14  Elinor, pleased to have her governed for a moment by such a motive, though believing it hardly possible that she could sit out the dinner, said no more; and adjusting her dress for her as well as she could, while Marianne still remained on the bed, was ready to assist her into the dining room as soon as they were summoned to it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
15  Elinor advised her to lie down again, and for a moment she did so; but no attitude could give her ease; and in restless pain of mind and body she moved from one posture to another, till growing more and more hysterical, her sister could with difficulty keep her on the bed at all, and for some time was fearful of being constrained to call for assistance.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29