BLOW in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - blow in Great Expectations
1  So was I, Herbert, when the blow first fell.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLI
2  It was like striking out a horseshoe complete, in a single blow.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
3  It seemed to me that he took all blows and buffets now with just the same air as he had taken mine then.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
4  I was so very nervous, that I had already lighted the Aged's sausage like a torch, and been obliged to blow it out.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLV
5  It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
6  He had a pipe in his mouth, and he took it out, and, after slowly blowing all his smoke away and looking hard at me all the time, nodded.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
7  She gave me to understand on the stairs, that it was a blow to dear Mrs. Pocket that dear Mr. Pocket should be under the necessity of receiving gentlemen to read with him.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
8  Mr. Wopsle had greatly alarmed me more than once, by his blowing and hard breathing; but I knew the sounds by this time, and could dissociate them from the object of pursuit.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
9  So, in my case; all the work, near and afar, that tended to the end, had been accomplished; and in an instant the blow was struck, and the roof of my stronghold dropped upon me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
10  He looked rather sly when I mentioned Miss Skiffins, and stopped in the street to blow his nose, with a roll of the head, and a flourish not quite free from latent boastfulness.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
11  I never have been so surprised in my life, as I was when I let out the first blow, and saw him lying on his back, looking up at me with a bloody nose and his face exceedingly fore-shortened.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
12  She had been struck with something blunt and heavy, on the head and spine; after the blows were dealt, something heavy had been thrown down at her with considerable violence, as she lay on her face.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
13  The cold wind seemed to blow colder there than outside the gate; and it made a shrill noise in howling in and out at the open sides of the brewery, like the noise of wind in the rigging of a ship at sea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
14  Water was splashing, and mud was flying, and oaths were being sworn, and blows were being struck, when some more men went down into the ditch to help the sergeant, and dragged out, separately, my convict and the other one.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
15  Her chest had dropped, so that she stooped; and her voice had dropped, so that she spoke low, and with a dead lull upon her; altogether, she had the appearance of having dropped body and soul, within and without, under the weight of a crushing blow.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
16  He gave the medical testimony, in pointed imitation of our local practitioner; and he piped and shook, as the aged turnpike-keeper who had heard blows, to an extent so very paralytic as to suggest a doubt regarding the mental competency of that witness.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
17  I have seen him so terrify a client or a witness by ceremoniously unfolding this pocket-handkerchief as if he were immediately going to blow his nose, and then pausing, as if he knew he should not have time to do it before such client or witness committed himself, that the self-committal has followed directly, quite as a matter of course.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
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