CALM in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - calm in Sense and Sensibility
1  After a moment's pause, he spoke with calmness.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
2  "You are quite in the right," replied Elinor calmly.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
3  But the letter, when she was calm enough to read it, brought little comfort.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
4  Never in her life had Elinor found it so difficult to be calm, as at that moment.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43
5  It was too great a shock to be borne with calmness, and she immediately left the room.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
6  I understand you," he replied, with an expressive smile, and a voice perfectly calm; "yes, I am very drunk.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 44
7  Elinor needed little observation to perceive that her reserve was a mere calmness of manner with which sense had nothing to do.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
8  Her unwillingness to quit her mother was her only restorative to calmness; and at the moment of parting her grief on that score was excessive.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
9  He imagined, and calmly could he imagine it, that her extravagance, and consequent distress, had obliged her to dispose of it for some immediate relief.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
10  John Dashwood was greatly astonished; but his nature was calm, not open to provocation, and he never wished to offend anybody, especially anybody of good fortune.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
11  In this calm kind of way, with very little interest on either side, they continued to talk, both of them out of spirits, and the thoughts of both engaged elsewhere.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
12  The sort of desperate calmness with which this was said, lasted no longer than while she spoke, and was immediately followed by a return of the same excessive affliction.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
13  The calm and polite unconcern of Lady Middleton on the occasion was a happy relief to Elinor's spirits, oppressed as they often were by the clamorous kindness of the others.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
14  In a short time Elinor saw Willoughby quit the room by the door towards the staircase, and telling Marianne that he was gone, urged the impossibility of speaking to him again that evening, as a fresh argument for her to be calm.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
15  That her sister's affections WERE calm, she dared not deny, though she blushed to acknowledge it; and of the strength of her own, she gave a very striking proof, by still loving and respecting that sister, in spite of this mortifying conviction.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
16  Had she tried to speak, or had she been conscious of half Mrs. Jennings's well-meant but ill-judged attentions to her, this calmness could not have been maintained; but not a syllable escaped her lips; and the abstraction of her thoughts preserved her in ignorance of every thing that was passing before her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
17  She took the first opportunity of affronting her mother-in-law on the occasion, talking to her so expressively of her brother's great expectations, of Mrs. Ferrars's resolution that both her sons should marry well, and of the danger attending any young woman who attempted to DRAW HIM IN; that Mrs. Dashwood could neither pretend to be unconscious, nor endeavor to be calm.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
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