CIVIL in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - civil in Sense and Sensibility
1  Elinor, with great civility, declined the proposal.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
2  Elinor tried to make a civil answer, though doubting her own success.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
3  Elinor made her a civil reply, and they walked on for a few minutes in silence.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
4  She was always a very affable and free-spoken young lady, and very civil behaved.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47
5  For my part, I think they are vastly agreeable, provided they dress smart and behave civil.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
6  Colonel Brandon must be the man; and no civility shall be wanting on my part to make him pleased with you and your family.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
7  They mean no less to be civil and kind to us now," said Elinor, "by these frequent invitations, than by those which we received from them a few weeks ago.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
8  Elinor was prevented from making any reply to this civil triumph, by the door's being thrown open, the servant's announcing Mr. Ferrars, and Edward's immediately walking in.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35
9  As such, however, they were treated by her with quiet civility; and by her husband with as much kindness as he could feel towards anybody beyond himself, his wife, and their child.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
10  But so it ought to be; they are people of large fortune, they are related to you, and every civility and accommodation that can serve to make your situation pleasant might be reasonably expected.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
11  He addressed her with easy civility, and twisted his head into a bow which assured her as plainly as words could have done, that he was exactly the coxcomb she had heard him described to be by Lucy.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
12  Mrs. Palmer, on the contrary, who was strongly endowed by nature with a turn for being uniformly civil and happy, was hardly seated before her admiration of the parlour and every thing in it burst forth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
13  She instantly saw that it was not unnoticed by him, that he even observed Marianne as she quitted the room, with such astonishment and concern, as hardly left him the recollection of what civility demanded towards herself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
14  Elinor, who did justice to Mrs. Jennings's kindness, though its effusions were often distressing, and sometimes almost ridiculous, made her those acknowledgments, and returned her those civilities, which her sister could not make or return for herself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
15  Their dress was very smart, their manners very civil, they were delighted with the house, and in raptures with the furniture, and they happened to be so doatingly fond of children that Lady Middleton's good opinion was engaged in their favour before they had been an hour at the Park.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
16  Lady Middleton had sent a very civil message by him, denoting her intention of waiting on Mrs. Dashwood as soon as she could be assured that her visit would be no inconvenience; and as this message was answered by an invitation equally polite, her ladyship was introduced to them the next day.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
17  He said much of his earnest desire of their living in the most sociable terms with his family, and pressed them so cordially to dine at Barton Park every day till they were better settled at home, that, though his entreaties were carried to a point of perseverance beyond civility, they could not give offence.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
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