COLD in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - cold in Great Expectations
1  He was awfully cold, to be sure.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
2  The weather was miserably raw, and the two cursed the cold.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVIII
3  I found Herbert dining on cold meat, and delighted to welcome me back.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXX
4  I half expected to see him drop down before my face and die of deadly cold.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
5  "That's true," said Estella, with a cold careless smile that always chilled me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
6  It was a dry cold night, and the wind blew keenly, and the frost was white and hard.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
7  Again he took both my hands and put them to his lips, while my blood ran cold within me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
8  What I suffered from, was the incompatibility between his cold presence and my feelings towards Estella.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
9  When a man's alone on these flats, with a light head and a light stomach, perishing of cold and want, he hears nothin all night, but guns firing, and voices calling.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
10  The cold wind seemed to blow colder there than outside the gate; and it made a shrill noise in howling in and out at the open sides of the brewery, like the noise of wind in the rigging of a ship at sea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
11  All this time, I was getting on towards the river; but however fast I went, I couldn't warm my feet, to which the damp cold seemed riveted, as the iron was riveted to the leg of the man I was running to meet.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
12  We were joined by no stragglers from the village, for the weather was cold and threatening, the way dreary, the footing bad, darkness coming on, and the people had good fires in-doors and were keeping the day.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
13  But I must have lost it longer than I had thought, since, although I could recognize nothing in the darkness and the fitful lights and shadows of our lamps, I traced marsh country in the cold damp wind that blew at us.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVIII
14  Mrs. Joe was soon landed, and Uncle Pumblechook was soon down too, covering the mare with a cloth, and we were soon all in the kitchen, carrying so much cold air in with us that it seemed to drive all the heat out of the fire.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
15  And yet this man was dressed in coarse gray, too, and had a great iron on his leg, and was lame, and hoarse, and cold, and was everything that the other man was; except that he had not the same face, and had a flat broad-brimmed low-crowned felt hat on.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
16  There had been some light snow, overnight, and it lay nowhere else to my knowledge; but, it had not quite melted from the cold shadow of this bit of garden, and the wind caught it up in little eddies and threw it at the window, as if it pelted me for coming there.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
17  Soon afterwards, Biddy, Joe, and I, had a cold dinner together; but we dined in the best parlor, not in the old kitchen, and Joe was so exceedingly particular what he did with his knife and fork and the saltcellar and what not, that there was great restraint upon us.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXV
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.