COMMON in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - common in Great Expectations
1  That ain't the way to get out of being common, old chap.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
2  And as to being common, I don't make it out at all clear.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
3  To the best of my belief, our case was in the last aspect a rather common one.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
4  I fancied, as I looked at her, that I slipped hopelessly back into the coarse and common boy again.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
5  I took the opportunity of being alone in the courtyard to look at my coarse hands and my common boots.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
6  Now it was all coarse and common, and I would not have had Miss Havisham and Estella see it on any account.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
7  Being far too ill to remain in the common prison, he was removed, after the first day or so, into the infirmary.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVI
8  I was not averse to doing this, as it served to make me and my boat a commoner incident among the water-side people there.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVII
9  I wanted to make Joe less ignorant and common, that he might be worthier of my society and less open to Estella's reproach.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
10  But I felt that the kiss was given to the coarse common boy as a piece of money might have been, and that it was worth nothing.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
11  You have been in every line I have ever read since I first came here, the rough common boy whose poor heart you wounded even then.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
12  "Yes, Joseph, says you," here Pumblechook shook his head and hand at me, "'he knows my total deficiency of common human gratitoode."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVIII
13  When we was put in the dock, I noticed first of all what a gentleman Compeyson looked, wi his curly hair and his black clothes and his white pocket-handkercher, and what a common sort of a wretch I looked.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLII
14  We ordered something rather special for dinner, with a bottle of something similarly out of the common way, in order that our minds might be fortified for the occasion, and we might come well up to the mark.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
15  I thought how Joe and my sister were then sitting in the kitchen, and how I had come up to bed from the kitchen, and how Miss Havisham and Estella never sat in a kitchen, but were far above the level of such common doings.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
16  When I got up to my little room and said my prayers, I did not forget Joe's recommendation, and yet my young mind was in that disturbed and unthankful state, that I thought long after I laid me down, how common Estella would consider Joe, a mere blacksmith; how thick his boots, and how coarse his hands.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
17  It being Saturday night, I found the landlord looking rather grimly at these records; but as my business was with Joe and not with him, I merely wished him good evening, and passed into the common room at the end of the passage, where there was a bright large kitchen fire, and where Joe was smoking his pipe in company with Mr. Wopsle and a stranger.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
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